Black History Culture : Zamba Zembola 1780 -?

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Aug 19, 2009.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Zamba Zembola (b. about 1780) is the author of the 1847 slave narrative "The Life and Adventures of Zamba, an African Negro King; and his Experience of Slavery in South Carolina", which describes his kidnapping and 40 years of labor on a slave plantation.

    Zebola was the son of a king of a small community in the Congo. When he was in his twenties, his father did business with American and British traders. One such trader was Captain Winton, who befriended Zebola and taught him the rudiments of education. Captain Winton eventually invited Zebola to accompany him to America on his slave ship. Zebola agreed and road to America as a free man, while describing the squalid conditions in which the slaves were kept. When the boat arrived in America, Zebola was kidnapped and sold as a slave.

    Zebola worked on a plantation in South Carolina for over forty years before achieving his freedom. His autobiography was published in 1847.

    [​IMG]


    The Life and Adventures of Zamba, an African Negro King;
    and His Experience of Slavery in South Carolina. Written by Himself.
    Corrected and Arranged by Peter Neilson:
    (Electronic Edition.)



    READ ENTIRE BOOK HERE
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    "...CAPTAIN WINTON arrived soon after this matter had occurred, and as usual we traded to a large extent. I at last told him that my curiosity was so excited on various subjects, that I should most likely be ready to accompany him in his next voyage. Some time after this, Zillah brought me another son; but, like the first, he only survived a few months; and this circumstance, although it by no means lessened my affection for my wife, increased my desire to go abroad. Nothing remarkable occurred for a considerable time; and towards the end of the season, when Captain Winton again made his appearance, I decided to make my long-projected voyage. As I have always conceived that evil, whether to ourselves or others, comes soon enough without anticipating it, I had never hinted either to Zillah or my mother anything regarding my intention of leaving Africa;

    Page 85
    and now that I told them of my determination, they were of course in great grief, and used every endearing art to detain me. But I was firm to my purpose; and at length some of my arguments, and the promise of my return, had the effect of pacifying them a little. I arranged all my government affairs, and appointed my two brothers-in-law to act as regents in my absence, either jointly or separately.

    Captain Winton was very anxious that I should put on board all the gold dust and other African produce that I possessed, and as many slaves as I could muster. I was not, however, blind to the imprudence of such a course: the ship might be lost, or I might be cut off by sickness or accident; and in either case I should be doing great injustice to my family to incur the loss of so much treasure. I therefore shipped only a part of my property; namely, thirty-two prime slaves, about thirty pounds of gold dust, and somewhat over two hundred doubloons in gold coin. The captain had brought me a farther supply of clothing, both fine and coarse, which, with some African rarities and my gold, were stowed in two fine trunks that Winton made me a present of. He seemed, indeed, as if he could not do enough for my accommodation; and had I only possessed a little more shrewdness, and been less inexperienced in the ways of this deceitful world, I should have perceived that be had some underhand intentions in regard to me....

    ...Captain Winton accommodated me with a handsome stateroom, and we left the Congo on the first day of October 1800..."