Black People : Young, black and buried in debt: How for-profit colleges prey on African-American ambition

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by RAPTOR, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Blacks Preyed Upon by For-Profit Colleges
    Education corporations like Phoenix University have entrapped record numbers of African Americans in high debt and poor quality college course with no jobs at the end of the process, said journalist Kai Wright, author of an article titled “Young, Black and Buried in Debt: How For-Profit Colleges Prey on African American Ambitions.” Black college enrollment increased 35 percent between 2003 and 2009, twice the rate of white increase, according to Wright. However, most of the increase was in pursuit of “subprime degrees” from for-profit schools “that play on people’s ambitions and trick them into a terrible deal, because they’re desperate.”

    Listen to interview: http://blackagendareport.com/conten...work-glen-ford-and-nellie-bailey-–-week-72213

    There are a few dictums that have enjoyed pride of place in black American families alongside “Honor your parents” and “Do unto others” since at least Emancipation. One of them is this: The road to freedom passes through the schoolhouse doors.
    After all, it was illegal even to teach an enslaved person to read in many states; under Jim Crow, literacy tests were used for decades to deny black voters their rights. So no surprise that from Reconstruction to the first black president, the consensus has been clear. The key to “winning the future,” in one of President Obama’s favorite phrases, is to get educated. “There is no surer path to success in the middle class than a good education,” the president declared in his much-discussed speech on the roots of gun violence in black Chicago.

    Rarely has that message resounded so much as now, with nearly one in seven black workers still jobless. Those who’ve found work have moved out of the manufacturing and public sectors, where good jobs were once available without a higher ed degree, and into the low-wage service sector, to which the uncredentialed are now relegated. So while it has become fashionable lately to speculate about middle-class kids abandoning elite colleges for adventures in entrepreneurship, an entirely different trend has been unfolding in black America — people are going back to school in droves.
    It’s true at all levels of education. Yes, black college enrollment shot up by nearly 35 percent between 2003 and 2009, nearly twice the rate at which white enrollment increased. But we’re getting all manner of schooling as we seek either an advantage in or refuge from the collapsed job market. As I’ve reported on the twin housing and unemployment crises in black neighborhoods in recent years, I’ve heard the same refrain from struggling strivers up and down the educational ladder: “I’m getting my papers, maybe that’ll help.” GEDs, associates degrees, trade licenses, certifications, you name it, we’re getting it. Hell, I even went and got certified in selling wine; journalism’s a shrinking trade, after all.

    But this headlong rush of black Americans to get schooled has also led too many down a depressingly familiar path. As with the mortgage market of the pre-crash era, those who are just entering in the higher ed game have found themselves ripe for the con man’s picking. They’ve landed, disproportionately, at for-profit schools, rather than at far less expensive public community colleges, or at public universities. And that means they’ve found themselves loaded with unimaginable debt, with little to show for it, while a small group of financial players have made a great deal of easy money. Sound familiar? Two points if you hear troublesome echoes of the subprime mortgage crisis.

    Read more: http://www.salon.com/2013/06/09/you...t_colleges_prey_on_african_american_ambition/
     
  2. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    When we want to go back to school to earn an associates degree or learn a trade and prepare for certification . . . COMMUNITY COLLEGES are the best route, in my opinion. Although tuition costs at CC's have risen over the years, they are still cheaper and sometimes better at specializing in certain types of degree fields than 4-year institutions.

    Tuition costs continue to rise also at 4-year public institutions. And, it's taking students longer to graduate with a degree. In 2010, by racial/ethnic category, it looked like the following:

    "Six-year graduation rates of first-time, full-time students at four-year colleges vary by race/ethnicity and sector (Figure 9.3b; Figures 9.3f–9.3m). Asian American students at four-year colleges have the highest six-year graduation rate (68.9 percent), followed by white students (62 percent), Hispanic students (50.6 percent), American Indian students (40.3 percent) and African American students (40.1 percent)."​

    With all the changes mandated by the Supreme Court in recent years relative to college admissions policies, it's getting tougher and tougher for our Black children/people to get admitted to a university and when they do, programs in place to support them while they are in college are being challenged also. The debt load while in college can be quite substantial with no guarantees of a job upon graduation. The longer our students are in school, the higher the debt. I've witnessed many Black students having to quit with high debt; or be placed on academic probation because they need to work in low paying jobs and go to school at the same time, which can cause their grades to suffer.

    It's a true cause for celebration when Black students are admitted, enrolled and graduate...:party: I do all that I can to support our students and help them navigate a system that counts them for their diversity numbers, but doesn't want to recognize how a racist society has placed them at a disadvantage and doesn't really want to support them.

    Someone asked me a long time ago, why bother getting a college degree? My response then and personal philosophy still is . . . it's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
     
  3. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Frontline: College, Inc (Full Documentary/Film)

    http://goo.gl/wpgI3I

    Note: Shortened the URL because it was trying to embed the film but it did not work.
     
  4. Corvo

    Corvo navigator of live MEMBER

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    buyer beware - This nations education systems are weak. even it's so called public higher Education. So to get in dept, one better have a great chance at a higher paying job. Other wise it's better to go the old school way, by learning how to do things by experience and go into customer service directly.
     
  5. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Great Topic and Posts! :toast:

    Today, it's almost as if you can't get a decent job without some sort of piece of paper.

    I imagine it's only gonna get worse ... but we gotta keep try'n any way.

    It's hard out here for our babies. Thanks for sharing everyone!

    Much Love and Peace.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  6. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Emphasis is now being placed on college degrees in the STEM disciplines -- science, technology, engineering and math. The U.S. has fallen behind a lot of countries with producing future employees with these types of degrees and the representation of African Americans on predominantly white college campuses in these disciplines is significantly lower than their white counterparts.

    It's not about competency, it's about proper preparation and access for our Black students. There are some faculty and school administrators that believe that Blacks are genetically inferior to whites and, therefore, less intelligent (I know, that's not a major news flash! :mad:.) So they (we) are looked upon as "affirmative action admits" just to add a splash of color to the student body and not much more. For the high achieving Black students, they are always viewed as the exception to the rule -- he or she's really smart . . . for a Black person.

    If our students are not coming out of homes where families promote education; or if they are attending schools that are obviously not investing in them, brainwashing them with lies about who they are and their history, where the quality of their education is pathetic; or where they are attempting to learn in hostile school environments, most likely they won't be able to successfully compete at the college level.

    Like us, our children need help in establishing a game plan that focuses on their future. A college degree is good to have but, not all college degrees will give you a good return on your investment. College isn't for everyone. Some people 'make it' without one. Being an entrepreneur and owning your own business isn't for everyone. Some people enjoy not having to depend on their own brain juice and energy to earn a living. These are the people who simply want a job (or career) that pays a decent wage higher than the rate of inflation, working 40 hrs a week with some benefits and weekends off. Parents should be investing in their children's future in some kind of way. You don't have to be a parent with letters behind your name to engage in these conversations.

    What do you want to be when you grow up? Let's work together to figure out how to get you there.
     
  7. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    It's not just "our babies".

    There are a lot of older Black workers who have been displaced in the workplace and are enrolled in UOP or similar programs and career colleges.

    I took one class for only one semester at UOP, in an MBA program and am still repaying back a loan almost five years later, for one course.
     
  8. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    You're correct, Bro. Omowale Jabali, more and more adults (non-traditional students) are returning to school to earn graduate degrees, graduate-professional degrees and trades that lead to a different career path. So the debt of an education does not just affect students between the ages of 18-25.

    "Student loans for undergraduates are capped at $57,500, but graduate students have no limit, through a "Grad Plus" program that lets them borrow as much as their college charges."

    But does President Obama offer some relief?

    Obama Plans to Expand Student Loan Forgiveness

    [​IMG]
    Billions of dollars in student loans could be forgiven over the next decade, under a proposal in President Barack Obama's budget to expand the program's income-based repayment system.

    Student advocates are enthusiastic over the prospect, but critics complain the expansion could extend a program that already encourages young people to borrow too much money and leave taxpayers with their college bills, reports the Wall Street Journal. They also say forgiving debt gives a taxpayer gift to people who need it the least, such as attorneys, doctors, and other white-collar people with graduate degrees.

    The program already allows most borrowers with loans issued since October 2007 to make payments equal to 10 percent of their income after taxes and basic living expenses. After 20 years of on-time payments, or 10 years for people working in public or nonprofit jobs, the rest of the balance is forgiven.
    Read more about President Obama's student debt forgiveness program here.
     
  9. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother Omowale Jabali ... you're right ... thanks for the correction ... it aint just the babies ... :)

    Sister NNQueen ... thank you too for the information! I'm reading and learning ... :research:

    Much Much Love and Peace.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  10. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    They switched my Direct Loan to Sallie Mae and I am still dealing with this right now.

    I made sure that my kids didn't have to get in the kind of debt for education loans like I did. They are much better off than me.
     
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