Black People : You are being WATCHED!

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by HODEE, Aug 19, 2015.

?

Do you feel safe using your cell?

Poll closed Oct 18, 2015.
  1. Yes, regardless of the monitoring

    50.0%
  2. No, it is an invasion of privacy and most of it goes to far.

    50.0%
  1. HODEE

    HODEE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Privacy. There is none. We paying for a service so we can keep in touch and communicate.

    It was supplied and set-up and is being used for further control and manipulation.

    They are using it, and it is ATT. I was just offered a job to monitor and control traffic using this protocol. The pay was $52.00 an hour. I would have taken the job, but after looking more into this technology, it is way above what I have experience to do. Also looking further into the technology uncovered what I am sharing. We are Set-up and will be used. I have done surveillance equipment that tracks anything transmitting, but this is something even more sinister.

    BE CAREFUL what you say and type across that cell. It is being tracked, listened to and used to control.
    =======================

    Mobile privacy open to global cyber snooping from 'SS7 protocol'
    by Jason Murdock
    17 Aug 2015

    [​IMG]
    The security of global mobile phone networks has been called into question after a controlled hack showed how phone calls and text messages can be intercepted by cyber criminals.

    An experiment carried out for Australian TV programme 60 Minutes demonstrated a vulnerability in Signalling System Number 7 (SS7), a global system used by around 800 telecoms companies across the world to share mobile data while roaming.

    However, the system shows identifiable information, including a mobile phone's unique IMEI number, details of the account holder and the closest cell tower.

    The hack, which was given legal permission to take place, shows how German security consultant Luca Melette, working from Berlin, was able to intercept and record a mobile phone conversation and a text message exchange between 60 Minutes reporter Ross Coulthart and independent Australian senator Nick Xenophon.

    Using the SS7 network allowed the hacker to hear and record the conversation in real time and to 'geo-track' the movements of the participants via nearby cell towers.

    Xenophon, who also gave permission for the hack to take place, explained that he was shocked that the vulnerability existed and has called for a public inquiry.

    "It means anyone with a mobile phone can be hacked, can be bugged, can be harassed. The implications of it are enormous and what we find shocking is that the security services, the intelligence services, know about this vulnerability," he said.

    Coulthart explained that the scope of potential cyber attacks is growing as more people get access to SS7 protocols.

    "Historically, only large telecoms providers were allowed to query SS7 for subscriber data, but in recent years VoIP providers, smaller phone companies and numerous third-party SMS messaging services are now gaining access," he said.

    However, Coulthart warned that intelligence agencies may not want the SS7 vulnerability to be fixed.

    "It has long been speculated in security industry circles that the reason why countries like Australia and the US have not rushed to ensure the SS7 vulnerability is fixed is because the location tracking and call bugging capacity has been widely exploited by intelligence services for espionage," he said.
     
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  2. anAfrican

    anAfrican Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    just one of the reasons i'm not interested in a smart phone. ... or windows ... or javascript ... or facebook ...

    thnx! (this amplifies a couple posts in the tech forum.)

    p.s.; should have taken the job anyway: inside info and access to some tools and tech that could prove useful when/if we ever manage to get serious about getting our "get liberated" game on! :-D
     
  3. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    $52 ? take da job.........:SuN034:
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    why yall trippin? we soon realized back in the 60's CRM that there was no such thing as privacy.
     
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  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :toast:


    How to Keep Windows 10 From 'Spying' on You
    Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Clyde C Coger Jr, Aug 5, 2015

    https://destee.com/threads/how-to-keep-windows-10-from-spying-on-you.84001/


    ...

     
  6. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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    Linux provides just as many, if not more, ways vulnerabilities than windows. The only real security is an unplugged computer/phone, powered down and locked in a safe. ;-)
     
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  7. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    ...

    Thanks, but for some reason, I can't see doing Linux. Meanwhile, I have posted several Threads on how to get around security issues with Windows 10 ... and will go with that advice.



     
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  8. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    We ... shaka64 and ceebee ... discussed this last night ... 251 263 5220 ... monitoring and such

    oldsoul has said for years ... behave as if every word and action is being recorded ... just go 'head and assume that

    then you aint say'n or doin nuth'n you aint spoze to ... 'cause you know they listening

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  9. ceebee

    ceebee Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I heard that.. hehe.

    I used Win10 for a little bit but it crashed horribly. I'm not that comfortable with them taking tons of my info,
    but it doesn't really upset me greatly, more annoying.

    I just downloaded my entire google archive, and its only a couple gigs - most of it e-mail, and they included spam for some reason.

    In either case, Google and other companies have 100x that amount of data stored on me, generated by me, that I'll never see.

    That's fairly upsetting, I could probably use that data. I don't believe there is a way to (a) get it (b) remove it.

    It is very likely that in the future some of this information can be used against me. I'm not ruling that out.

    However, I'm just a normal person. So I don't really see much need for extreme 'privacy' when it comes to corporate entities.
    Common sense with extra precaution should be sufficient.

    As an aside I do not leave out the possibility of engaging in extreme revolutionary activities in the future.
    At that time, I won't be on the internet or with a cellular phone.

    Also, for background, I grew up hacking computers in the 90's, and saw computer security 'evolve' - and in early 2000 became not
    just disillusioned with technology, but understanding that it was being shaped in a particular way, for a particular purpose.

    See Chomsky on Kurzweil for more info..
     
  10. ceebee

    ceebee Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    While the number of vulnerabilities any OS has that are *discovered* is relative to the number of people who use them (e.g. Apple viruses become more popular as more people use MacOS/IOS) - here is a control test you can perform for yourself, regarding the above statement.

    Download a 20MB distribution of Linux. Spend some time, and read the code (at 20MB compiled, it might take a hired programmer a week or 2?)
    From there you can ascertain exactly what is going on with your system from the source. You can then compile it and run it, and if you were using
    a slim web browser like w3m or lynx, have a fairly good idea that your system is secure.

    This is impossible to do with Windows or MacOS.

    Once you go into more complicated distributions of linux, the amount of code increases, while the ability to audit it decreases.
    In fact, modern web browsers are so complicated that its easier for me to compile an entire OS than to compile JUST the browser...

    I just think the statement is not quite correct, as the average person who uses Linux has some interest in how the system works,
    while the average desktop user simply wants it to work consistently.

    Browsing the web today entails implicit tracking of all sorts. I use windows on my desktop, but prefer being able to use any system.
     
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