Black History Culture : Working on a Plantation

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by dunwiddat, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. dunwiddat

    dunwiddat Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My mother worked for white folks before I was born. She worked at the home of a white couple. When my sister and I were born she had stopped and began selling fruits at home.

    But my aunt and great aunt worked as cooks on this plantation. I remember as a young girl in the 60's both my aunt and great aunt would walk to the plantation each morning making sure they arrived there before 7.30. They cooked and ironed. The work was tough. If the white folks had dinner they would have to clean the kitchen before they leave...sometimes the plantation manager would take them home...but most of the time they would walk to their homes. This during the time when there were no street lights in the rural areas of Barbados. The only light they had was during the time moon was out. Fortunately for them crime was not such a problem then. Regardless of how late they got home, they would have to be ready to meet the job again at 7.30.

    These two women were very good cooks and they could bake anything. I learned most of my culinary skills from these two women. Although my mother was a great cook, I believed they had the edge on my mom.

    Today when I consider that a lot of young people waste their talent and fritter away their time, I reflect on these women who had no option but to work where they work.. Opportunities for other work was nigh impossible, but they did their jobs with great zeal. The pay was little but today I know they have made a mark on my life.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    In the U.S. as well, most Black women worked as "domestics" in some capacity: maids and cooks..... in private homes, hotels or country clubs.

    And, yes, in the South where "share-cropping" was still prevalent even into the 70s, many Black families still lived and worked on "plantations" owned by the former white families who had once owned their ancestors.
     
  3. John Albert

    John Albert Member MEMBER

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    yeah,plantation is a great activity and hobby man!
     
  4. MsVeraisblessed

    MsVeraisblessed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    what the hell did i just read?. care to rephrase what you mean ''plantation is a great activity and hobby man''...
     
  5. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You're right. Back when, there was indeed less time for wasting time or a person simply wasn't going to eat. Instead of many in this generation using the time that's been freed up for us by works done in the previous generations, many would rather sit idle not doing anything worthwhile at all, not bettering their brother or their sister, nor being their for their family.

    Too many are taking terrible advantage of what they are given, with frivolousness, and this will only make for their looking back on their life all the more disappointing asking, "What did I really accomplish? Who have I pushed forward?"
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    I do have some friends whose families lived on plantations up until the latter 70s/early 80s in MS and LA.

    Some of my own ancestors "share-cropped" for many years, working on land passed down in the white families who owned our enslaved ancestors.

    And some of my ancestors owned their land which they farmed themselves. ...That land is still lived on and operated by my family in GA, today.
     
  7. MsVeraisblessed

    MsVeraisblessed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    kids these days wouldn't understand the value of work that was permitted in those days. they wouldn't understand why most of those babies had to work alongside their parents (rain, hot, windy, snow,) on the plantation. they wouldnt understand that there weren't no fooling around had to work to survive.
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Elaborate/expound, please.
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    [​IMG]




    :lol:
     
  10. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I worked the tobacco plantations down south.
     
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