Black People : Will the escalation in Afghanistan bring DOPE to our community?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Putney Swope, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Most recall the revelations of Congresswoman Maxine Waters, Cynthia McKenney and Dick Gregory regarding the CIA strategy of flooding thier , product from the Contra wars into the Black community, so much cocaine that freebase could be sold on the street level at exhorbitant discount as Crack, resulting in the national crack epidemic, that fulfilled the illuminati's strategy of destroying Black homes and orphaning children.
    Do you think that with the escalatio of activity in Afghanistan
    based on the knowledge that opium production was banned by Afghanis in Sept 9 2001, but was reinstated when US troops arrived in Sept 13 2001,
    (Opium wars part 2?????)
    will there be a flooding of our communities of heroin?
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5ERlo1YnLU"]YouTube - Rep. Maxine Waters on CIA Drug Trafficking Part 1 of 4[/ame]

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZS_sVsz5SLU&feature=related"]YouTube - Rep. Maxine Waters on CIA Drug Trafficking Part 2 of 4[/ame]

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1U88VvmF08&feature=related"]YouTube - Rep. Maxine Waters on CIA Drug Trafficking Part 3 of 4[/ame]
     
  2. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  3. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    why are our men and women sent there?

    Afghanistan for Dummies

    Posted By admin On September 3, 2009 @ 9:28 am In Featured Stories | 98 Comments

    Ray McGovern
    Infowars
    September 3, 2009

    I’m going to ask for my money back. I’ve seen this Afghanistan movie before. The first time, Vietnam was in the title.

    As in an early scene from the Vietnam version, U.S. military officials are surprised to discover that the insurgents in Afghanistan are stronger than previously realized.

    And our protagonist, Gen. Westmoreland — sorry, I mean McChrystal — sees the situation as serious but salvageable. As Westmoreland did with President Lyndon Johnson, McChrystal is preparing to tell President Barack Obama that thousands of more troops are needed to achieve the U.S. objective — whatever that happens to be.


    As in Vietnam, uncertainty about objectives and how to measure success persist in Afghanistan. Never has this come through more clearly than in the fuzzy remarks of “Af-Pak” super-envoy Richard Holbrooke who has purview over Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    On Aug. 12 at the Center for American Progress, a Washington, D.C., think tank, Holbrooke tried to clarify how the Obama administration would gauge success in Afghanistan.

    John Podesta, the center’s president who was President Bill Clinton’s chief of staff and served as head of Obama’s transition team, waxed eloquent not only about his friend Holbrooke but Holbrooke’s team; really spectacular, impressive, multidisciplinary, interagency, truly exceptional were some of the bouquets thrown at team members.

    Holbrooke said his Af-Pak squad is “the best team” he’d ever worked with, adding that “Hillary” – the Secretary of State whose last name is Clinton – personally approved “every member.”

    It may indeed be a good team but that doesn’t change the fact that it appears to be on a fool’s errand. Each member has considerable expertise to offer, but no one knows where they’re headed.

    The whole thing reminds me of the old saw: If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there. (Or you might say Holbrooke’s team finds itself in a dark place peering into the distance looking for a light at the end of the tunnel.)

    Pressing for Answers

    To his credit, Podesta kept trying to get a clear answer from Holbrook about the overall objective in Afghanistan, as well as seeking some metrics to judge progress.

    “There is increasing concern here at home and in allied capitals abroad about the cost of winning in Afghanistan, and to what end-goals we should aspire,” Podesta said. “I hope to focus on … our objectives in Afghanistan and how we measure progress.”

    Holbrooke was as smooth — and vacuous — as Gen. William Westmoreland and his briefers were in Saigon:

    “We know the difference with input and output, and what you are seeing here is input,” Holbrooke said. “The payoff is still to come. We have to produce results, and we understand that.

    “And we’re not here today to tell you we’re winning or we’re losing. We’re not here today to say we’re optimistic or pessimistic. We’re here to tell you that we’re in this fight in a different way with a determination to succeed.”

    In an apparent attempt to get Podesta to stop asking about objectives and how to measure success, Holbrooke tossed a bouquet back at the Center for American Progress for doing “an extraordinary job of becoming a critical center for our efforts.”

    For those who may have missed it, Podesta’s Center surprised many, including me, by endorsing Obama’s non-strategy of throwing more troops at the problem in Afghanistan. (The charitable explanation is that there is something in the water here in Washington; less charitably, the Center may have feared losing its place at Obama’s table.)

    Holbrooke’s flattery, though, did not deter Podesta, who kept insisting on some kind of cogent answer about objectives and metrics.

    Podesta: “From the perspective of the American people, how do you define clear objectives of what you’re trying to succeed as outputs with the inputs that you just talked about?”

    Holbrooke: “A very key question, John, which you’re alluding to is, of course, if our objective is to defeat, destroy, dismantle al-Qaeda, and they’re primarily in Pakistan, why are we doing so much in Afghanistan? …

    “If you abandon the struggle in Afghanistan, you will suffer against al-Qaeda as well. But we have to be clear on what our national interests are here….

    “The specific goal you ask, John, — is really hard for me to address in specific terms. But I would say this about defining success in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the simplest sense, the Supreme Court test for another issue, we’ll know it when we see it.” (Emphasis added.)


    A d v e r t i s e m e n t

    Holbrooke almost chokes on the words as they proceed out of his mouth, and then takes a very visible gulp of air. Up until this point, Podesta has been bravely suppressing any outward sign of frustration with Holbrooke’s vacuous comments on U.S. objectives and measures of success.

    After the “we’ll know it when we see it” remark, Podesta pauses for a few seconds and looks at Holbrooke — as if to say, and that’s it? Then, like a high school teacher ready to move on to the next ill-prepared student, Podesta utters a curt "okay."

    “Know It When You See It”

    The Supreme Court test involving “know it when you see it” refers to a phrase used by former Justice Potter Stewart 45 years ago. Frustrated at not being able to define pornography in an obscenity case, he gave up and fell back on the “know it when you see it” formulation.

    The same phrase was used by a similarly frustrated official, former Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz, in December 2002, just three months before the U.S.-U.K. attack on Iraq.

    Unable to come up with any specific evidence of Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, but determined to rebut Saddam Hussein’s claims that he had none, Wolfowitz quipped, “It’s like the judge said about pornography. I can’t define it, but I will know it when I see it.”

    How is it that we let people get away with that kind of rubbish when it means people — Iraqis, Afghanis, as well as Americans — are going to get killed and maimed?

    But Holbrooke’s “we’ll know-it-when-we-see-it” measure of success is just the latest sign that the Obama administration has been playing the Af-Pak strategy by ear. The President himself seems generally aware of this, given his readiness to give wide latitude, not clear instructions, to Holbrooke and the generals.

    An early hint of the disarray came on March 27, a little more than two months into his presidency, when Obama showed up a half-hour late to the press conference at which he announced a “comprehensive, new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan.”

    No explanation was given for his lateness, which required TV talking heads to reach new heights of vapidity for a full 30 minutes. I ventured a guess at the time that his instincts were telling him he was about to do something he would regret.

    It soon became apparent that Obama’s 60-day Afghan policy review lacked specificity on strategy but tried to make up for that with lofty rhetoric — kudos to the alliterative speechwriter who coined the catchy phrase “disrupt, dismantle, and defeat al-Qaeda.”

    More important, the President also took pains to assure us that: “Going forward, we will not blindly stay the course.” Rather, he promised there will be “metrics to measure progress and hold ourselves accountable.”

    (Yet the key “metric” appears to be what Holbrooke blurted out on Aug. 12, “we’ll know it when we see it.”)

    In Holbrooke, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama appear to have picked a loser. It is bad enough that he does not seem to have a clue about how to measure success toward U.S. objectives — or, at least, cannot articulate them — even before a friendly audience.

    Perhaps Secretary Clinton and President Obama were also unaware of his well-deserved reputation for logical inconsistencies, not to mention the delight he takes in bullying foreign officials — the more senior the person, the better.

    A former Foreign Service officer who worked on the Balkans confided that he believes Holbrooke actually prolonged the Yugoslav civil war for several years by pushing a policy of covert military support for the Muslim side.

    It should come as no surprise, then, if Holbrooke ends up playing a role in deepening the Af-Pak quagmire, if only by adopting a belligerent attitude towards the Pashtuns and also the Pakistani government — not to mention rival U.S. officials.

    In sum, Holbrooke will probably prove more hindrance than help in working out a sensible U.S. strategy and objectives. Worse, he is not likely to serve as a much needed counterweight to the generals, who may well succeed in persuading Obama to give them still more troops for an unwinnable war.

    full article;
    http://www.infowars.com/afghanistan-for-dummies/print/
     
  4. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Heroin is "Good for Your Health": Occupation Forces support Afghan Narcotics Trade
    Multibillion dollar earnings for organized crime and Western financial Institutions
    By Prof. Michel Chossudovsky
    Global Research, April 29, 2007
    The occupation forces in Afghanistan are supporting the drug trade, which brings between 120 and 194 billion dollars of revenues to organized crime, intelligence agencies and Western financial institutions.

    The proceeds of this lucrative multibllion dollar contraband are deposited in Western banks. Almost the totality of revenues accrue to corporate interests and criminal syndicates outside Afghanistan.

    The Golden Crescent drug trade, launched by the CIA in the early 1980s, continues to be protected by US intelligence, in liason with NATO occupation forces and the British military. In recent developments, British occupation forces have promoted opium cultivation through paid radio advertisements.

    "A radio message broadcast across the province assured local farmers that the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) would not interfere with poppy fields currently being harvested.
    "Respected people of Helmand. The soldiers of ISAF and ANA do not destroy poppy fields," it said. "They know that many people of Afghanistan have no choice but to grow poppy. ISAF and the ANA do not want to stop people from earning their livelihoods." ( Quoted in The Guardian, 27 April 2007)

    While the controversial opium ads have been casually dismissed as an unfortunate mistake, there are indications that the opium economy is being promoted at the political level (including the British government of Tony Blair).

    The Senlis Council, an international think tank specialising in security and policy issues is proposing the development of licit opium exports in Afghanistan, with a view to promoting the production of pharmaceutical pain-killers, such as morphine and codeine. According to the Senlis Council, "the poppies are needed and, if properly regulated, could provide a legal source of income to impoverished Afghan farmers while, at the same time, depriving the drug lords and the Taliban of much of their income." (John Polanyi, Globe and Mail, 23 September 2006)

    The Senlis Council offers an alternative where "regulated poppy production in Afghanistan" could be developed to produce needed painkillers. The Senlis statement, however, fails to address the existing structure of licit opium exports, which is characterised by oversupply .

    The Senlis' campaign is part of the propaganda campaign. It has contrbuted to providing a false legitimacy to Afghanistan's opium economy. (See details of Senlis Project), which ultmately serves powerful vested interests.

    How much opium acreage is required to supply the pharmaceutical industry? According to the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), which has a mandate to exame issues pertaining to the supply of and demand for opiates used for medical purposes, "the supply of such opiates has for years been at levels well in excess of global demand".(Asian Times, February 2006) The INCB has recommended reducing the production of opiates due to World oversupply.



    At present, India is among the largest exporters of licit opium. Turkey, Australia, Britain and Spain are also major producers of licit opium.

    India's opium latex "is sold to licensed pharmaceutical and/or chemical manufacturing firms such as Mallinckrodt and Johnson & Johnson, under rules established by the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs and the International Narcotics Control Board, which require an extensive paper trail." (Opium in India)..

    Soaring Afghan Opium Production

    The United Nations has announced that opium poppy cultivation in Afghanistan has soared. There was a 59% increase in areas under opium cultivation in 2006. Production of opium is estimated to have increased by 49% in relation to 2005.
    The Western media in chorus blame the Taliban and the warlords. Western officials are said to believe that "the trade is controlled by 25 smugglers including three government ministers." (Guardian, op. cit).
    Yet in a bitter irony, US military presence has served to restore rather than eradicate the drug trade. Opium production has increased 33 fold from 185 tons in 2001 under the Taliban to 6100 tons in 2006. Cultivated areas have increased 21 fold since the 2001 US-led invasion.
    What the media reports fail to acknowledge is that the Taliban government was instrumental in 2000-2001 in implementing a successful drug eradication program, with the support and collaboration of the UN.
    Implemented in 2000-2001, the Taliban's drug eradication program led to a 94 percent decline in opium cultivation. In 2001, according to UN figures, opium production had fallen to 185 tons. Immediately following the October 2001 US led invasion, production increased dramatically, regaining its historical levels.
    The Vienna based UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that the 2006 harvest will be of the order of 6,100 tonnes, 33 times its production levels in 2001 under the Taliban government (3200 % increase in 5 years).
    Cultivation in 2006 reached a record 165,000 hectares compared with 104,000 in 2005 and 7,606 in 2001 under the Taliban

    Multibillion dollar trade
    According to the UN, Afghanistan supplies in 2006 some 92 percent of the world's supply of opium, which is used to make heroin.
    The UN estimates that for 2006, the contribution of the drug trade to the Afghan economy is of the order of 2.7 billion. What it fails to mention is the fact that more than 95 percent of the revenues generated by this lucrative contraband accrues to business syndicates, organized crime and banking and financial institutions. A very small percentage accrues to farmers and traders in the producing country.
    (See also UNODC, The Opium Economy in Afghanistan,
    http://www.unodc.org/pdf/publications/afg_opium_economy_www.pdf , Vienna, 2003, p. 7-8)
    "Afghan heroin sells on the international narcotics market for 100 times the price farmers get for their opium right out of the field".(US State Department quoted by the Voice of America (VOA), 27 February 2004).
    Based on wholesale and retail prices in Western markets, the earnings generated by the Afghan drug trade are colossal. In July 2006, street prices in Britain for heroin were of the order of Pound Sterling 54, or $102 a gram.
    Narcotics On the Streets of Western Europe
    One kilo of opium produces approximately 100 grams of (pure) heroin. 6100 tons of opium allows the production of 1220 tons of heroin with a 50 percent purity ratio.
    The average purity of retailed heroin can vary. It is on average 36%. In Britain, the purity is rarely in excess of 50 percent, while in the US it can be of the order of 50-60 percent.
    Based on the structure of British retail prices for heroin, the total proceeds of the Afghan heroin trade would be of the order of 124.4 billion dollars, assuming a 50 percent purity ratio. Assuming an average purity ratio of 36 percent and the average British price, the cash value of Afghan heroin sales would be of the order of 194.4 billion dollars.

    full article;
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=20070604&articleId=5514
     
  5. LindaChavis

    LindaChavis Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Putney

    I thought about you and these posts when they had a story about a local community that has a surge of folks in jail due to heroin related crimes. They are on it to the point they are commiting crime in that community at levels so high the jail is overcrowded and check this out. Its white folks.

    News story:
    LANCASTER, Ohio — The Fairfield County sheriff is looking for ways to deal with an explosion of heroin use in the cash-strapped county.

    Ninety-five percent of the people in the Fairfield County Jail are doing time for heroin possession -- including Alan Altier, 10TV's Kevin Landers reported.

    "It made me a liar, a cheater, a stealer and a thief," Altier said.

    He said he has been arrested at least 10 times for heroin in six years. The drug is not only cheap, but it is easy to get.

    "It's easier to find heroin than weed in central Ohio, especially in Fairfield County, it's bad down here," Altier said.

    The problem is so bad that one inmate swallowed eight balloons of heroin prior to his arrest in an attempt to sneak the drug into the jail.

    The county's two jails are designed to hold 75 prisoners, but the number of heroin arrests often pushes the number to 200 inmates, Landers reported.

    "We've run out of room," said Fairfield County Sheriff Dave Phalen. "We will spend $500,000-$700,000 to send prisoners to other counties."

    To solve the heroin problem, Phalen has asked the county for a bigger jail or a treatment center. However, in a county with the lowest sales tax in the state and a projected $1.6 million deficit next year, finding the money won't be easy.

    "We won't know how deep the budget cuts are for another month," Phalen said.

    The cuts may force Phalen to move deputies out of the jail and onto the streets. It is a decision that he said could make things worse.

    "One option may be closing a jail," Phalen said.

    Until a decision is made, the county will struggle to deal with heroin addicts and no treatment facility.

    Altier said he wonders if he'll every kick the habit.

    "I used to feel the only thing that would stop me was death, but I've been having a little bit of turn around since I've been locked up," Altier said.

    Phalen said another problem is the growing number of women who are addicted to heroin. He said this year 46 women were arrested for heroin, compared to eight to 10 women in prior years.

    Stay with 10TV News and 10TV.com for more information.
     
  6. LindaChavis

    LindaChavis Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I meant to add

    you know if its this bad for them...as when they have a cold we have something close to swine flu..LOL
     
  7. oldiesman

    oldiesman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    well you know america is gonna get something out of it[don"t they always?]if nothing more than those little[turbans]the afgans wear.
     
  8. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    yeah your right

    after all remember what the mob boss said in the Godfather about where it will be sold
     
  9. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Good evening, posters...

    But I feel and think Obama's intent and purpose is just the opposite...

    I. e., any politician has to cater to his voter base, and more than poor black parents etc. wind up with children and/or family members etc. as addicts...

    Actually, heroin addicts are far outnumbered by cocaine addicts, aka crackheads...

    So, let Obama even speak up and out about that, and I will consider his anti drug posting more than just another pr ploy to appease his so called 'working middle class' voting base...

    After all:

    Countless numbers of folk, who look like us, as in Afrocolumbians, also have gotten run off their ancestors and forebears land holdings, in order that all sides can eventually benefit from the lands, (via a decades spanning power struggle between stuck on stupid pseudo leftists and right wing government based militias, etc), i. e., which some misuse to produce the coca leaves etc., and that winds up as that other addictive substance being marketed, in our neck of the woods, too...

    So much for Uncle Sam's unending (and failed) 'war on drugs' as well...

    :10500:
     
  10. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    new bases were just put in Colombia recently a few months ago.
    Did you know that Chavez hates drugs,
    and that poppies are also grown in Colombia as well as coca?
    Since the Bolivaran revolution, Bolivia and Peru are no longer big dope growing nations, now Colombia is the last bastion.
     
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