Black People : Will Africa be the new "mid'east" war theater???

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Putney Swope, Sep 25, 2009.

  1. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Amid Africa's oil boom, U.S. binds ties
    Published: Sept. 17, 2009 at 2:02 PM


    Potentially major oil strikes announced by an American-led consortium and a British company in West Africa have bolstered the region's reputation as the world's hottest energy zone.

    It has also become the focus of the U.S. military's global mission to protect America's energy supplies, a development that critics fear will trigger more trouble than it will prevent.

    The Texas-based Anadarko Petroleum Corp. said Wednesday its deepwater Venus 1B well off the coast of Sierra Leone had hit paydirt and formed one of two "bookends" 700 miles apart across two prospective basins that extend into waters controlled by Liberia, Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana.

    These could each contain 150 million to 1 billion barrels of oil, according to Anadarko's CEO Al Walker.

    One of Anadarko's consortium partners, Tullow Oil of Britain, which has a vast array of licenses in Africa, recently announced a new potentially important discovery in its Ngassa field in Uganda.

    By 2025, the United States is expected to be importing about one-fifth of its oil from West Africa. That makes the region strategically important to the United States.

    In the scramble for new oil reserves as the planet's older fields become depleted, the U.S. military has become a predominant force in U.S.-African relations.

    Witness the 2008 inauguration of the U.S. military's latest command, Africa Command, or Africom, launched a year earlier in February 2007 by the George W. Bush administration, for whom energy security was of paramount importance.

    The Bush team insisted that Africom was intended to promote a humanitarian agenda, strengthen democracy in a continent noted for its tyrants and dictators, and improve economic growth. President Barack Obama's administration endorsed that.

    But many African see Africom's mission in more menacing terms: ensuring that the United States gets most of Africa's oil, not China or India, which need it to fuel their burgeoning economies.

    "While Obama administration officials insist that U.S. policy toward Africa is not being militarized, the evidence seems to suggest otherwise," says Gerald LeMelle, executive director of Africa Action, a non-governmental organization.

    LeMelle and other Africom critics argue that the new command -- which is headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany, because no African government will give it a home -- will only serve to keep dictators like the widely shunned President Teodoro Obiang Nguema of Equatorial Guinea, who overthrew his uncle in a 1979 military coup, in power.

    Obama vowed that he would rid the United States of the "tyranny of oil" by developing alternative sources of energy when he got to the White House in January.

    But Michael T. Klare, a U.S. energy specialist and professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College, argues that in the years ahead the United States, as well as Europe, will condemn millions of people to the tyranny of dictators.

    The United States, he said, "will remain dependent on oil derived from authoritarian regimes, weak states and nations in the midst of civil war."

    That pretty much covers Africa as it is today.

    This process of militarizing the energy business, and supporting unsavory regimes, began with the enunciation of the Carter Doctrine by President Jimmy Carter in his State of the Union address on Jan. 23, 1980, soon after the Islamic revolution triumphed in Iran and the Soviets invaded Afghanistan.

    This principle, endorsed and even expanded by successive presidents, stated that the United States would use military force against any power that threatened its access to Middle Eastern oil.

    full article;
    http://www.upi.com/Energy_Resources...as-oil-boom-US-binds-ties/UPI-22241253210568/
     
  2. CITIZEN

    CITIZEN Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't know...

    Africa gets gang-banged so often I am sure they all know they'll get a turn. There's plenty to go around too. Gems, precious metals, men that can work like 10 Europeans, the finest women on the planet. Everything there is a valuable resource. Milk and honey, all for the taking!
     
  3. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    And we should just sit here and folks over there and just LET this go on???

    I don't know, maybe I'm old fashioned but folks back in the 60s had a different attitude about hearing stuff like this
     
  4. anAfrican

    anAfrican Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    reading the thread title from the front page i got "will africa be the new 'mid east' ...". what with the iraq war ("what? no wmd? ... well, we're here anyway ...") and this afghanistan thing ("religious fanatics? get a rope!"), "we're" (usa) growing another segment. add in the "scare" of a nuclear powered iran, and "we've" got "all the justification we need" to sweep up iran, too.

    look at a map: iraq, iran, afghanistan. nice solid little block of land. look to the west of iraq and see saudi arabia right there. (add in the "concern" that a terrorist group had help from a somalian refugee in one of the seattle "refugee relocation centers", plus uncle sam's paying for/buying BOTH sides in the somali conflict [ain't that right on the tip of saudia arabia??!!] ...) saudi arabi - inactors of an African slave trade of their own back in the 8th century - imposers of a "religion" that is not our own - conquering invaders of our Northern Nations - and oil partners to this "great satan" of a usa ...

    well, i was gonna say "'new mid east'? for all intents and purposes; probably.".

    but having seen the actual title: "will Africa be the new "mid'east" war theater???" - oh, most definitely!! that whole coalition is heading straight in to once and for all time sweep up the remains of Africa right into their pockets.

    sadly, y'all gonna help, since you are now the "squirrels in the wheel" of their "global system of supremelunacy" ... at least until you stop doing their media and their entertainment, start building your own stuff, marketing your own stuff, educating your own children, supplying your own power needs ...
     
  5. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You speak truth to power

    :teach::time::lift::lift::climb::terrific::terrific::terrific:
    Like a true Pan Africanist
     
  6. Mad Skillz

    Mad Skillz Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Africa's oil boom and Africom

    Potentially major oil strikes announced by an American-led consortium and a British company in West Africa have bolstered the region's reputation as the world's hottest energy zone.

    It has also become the focus of the U.S. military's global mission to protect America's energy supplies, a development that critics fear will trigger more trouble than it will prevent.

    The Texas-based Anadarko Petroleum Corp. said Wednesday its deepwater Venus 1B well off the coast of Sierra Leone had hit paydirt and formed one of two "bookends" 700 miles apart across two prospective basins that extend into waters controlled by Liberia, Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana.

    These could each contain 150 million to 1 billion barrels of oil, according to Anadarko's CEO Al Walker.

    One of Anadarko's consortium partners, Tullow Oil of Britain, which has a vast array of licenses in Africa, recently announced a new potentially important discovery in its Ngassa field in Uganda.

    By 2025, the United States is expected to be importing about one-fifth of its oil from West Africa. That makes the region strategically important to the United States.

    In the scramble for new oil reserves as the planet's older fields become depleted, the U.S. military has become a predominant force in U.S.-African relations.

    Witness the 2008 inauguration of the U.S. military's latest command, Africa Command, or Africom, launched a year earlier in February 2007 by the George W. Bush administration, for whom energy security was of paramount importance.

    The Bush team insisted that Africom was intended to promote a humanitarian agenda, strengthen democracy in a continent noted for its tyrants and dictators, and improve economic growth. President Barack Obama's administration endorsed that.

    But many African see Africom's mission in more menacing terms: ensuring that the United States gets most of Africa's oil, not China or India, which need it to fuel their burgeoning economies.

    "While Obama administration officials insist that U.S. policy toward Africa is not being militarized, the evidence seems to suggest otherwise," says Gerald LeMelle, executive director of Africa Action, a non-governmental organization.

    LeMelle and other Africom critics argue that the new command -- which is headquartered in Frankfurt, Germany, because no African government will give it a home -- will only serve to keep dictators like the widely shunned President Teodoro Obiang Nguema of Equatorial Guinea, who overthrew his uncle in a 1979 military coup, in power.

    Obama vowed that he would rid the United States of the "tyranny of oil" by developing alternative sources of energy when he got to the White House in January.

    But Michael T. Klare, a U.S. energy specialist and professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College, argues that in the years ahead the United States, as well as Europe, will condemn millions of people to the tyranny of dictators.

    The United States, he said, "will remain dependent on oil derived from authoritarian regimes, weak states and nations in the midst of civil war."

    That pretty much covers Africa as it is today.

    This process of militarizing the energy business, and supporting unsavory regimes, began with the enunciation of the Carter Doctrine by President Jimmy Carter in his State of the Union address on Jan. 23, 1980, soon after the Islamic revolution triumphed in Iran and the Soviets invaded Afghanistan.

    This principle, endorsed and even expanded by successive presidents, stated that the United States would use military force against any power that threatened its access to Middle Eastern oil.
    That, Klare said in a January 2009 analysis, "led to U.S. involvement in three major wars and now risks further military entanglement in the greater Gulf area."
    "The U.S. military has come to serve as a global oil protection service, guarding pipelines, refineries and loading facilities in the Middle East and elsewhere," he said in a 2008 analysis.
    According to an estimate by the conservative U.S. National Defense Council Foundation, "The 'protection' of Persian Gulf oil alone costs the U.S. Treasury $138 billion a year -- up from $49 billion just before the invasion of Iraq," Klare says.
    Far from protecting U.S. energy supplies, he argues, this doctrine "to protect foreign oil supplies is likely to create anything but 'security.' It can, in fact, trigger violent 'blowback' against the United States. … If anything, this spiral of militarized insecurity is worsening."


    http://www.upi.com/Energy_Resources...as-oil-boom-US-binds-ties/UPI-22241253210568/
     
  7. CITIZEN

    CITIZEN Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Africa..

    We are all mad about it, not just in the 60's. They weren't able to put a stop to it back then, but maybe we have a shot.

    The biggest thing I don't get is why they feel the need to steal EVERYTHING. I asked this of someone once and they told me the only thing you get from saltines(like saltine ********) is crumbs.:10500:
     
  8. Putney Swope

    Putney Swope Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I never had a need to question evil,

    IMHO when a man swings at my head at a club with a bottle in his hand for no apparent reason, I'm not going to intellectualize about well maybe he is drunk, or depressed or on medication,

    I'm just going to duck and drop him
     
  9. Seneb

    Seneb Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "Will Africa be the new "mid'east" war theater???" No,they did every evils possible on the african soil,africa is already worst than the mid east...Now it's over for them they will bring a last and ultimate war not only in Africa but in the whole world,and then this will be their end.Knowledge of time...
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Re:

    "global oil protection service"

    SMH!
     
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