Black People Politics : Why the term African American is mostly offensive

Discussion in 'Black People Politics' started by firestorm87, Feb 14, 2015.

  1. firestorm87

    firestorm87 New Member MEMBER

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  2. CosmicMessenger

    CosmicMessenger Banned MEMBER

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    I see her point but I don't make decisions based on what WHITE people do.

    I am a BLACK man in America...not a "Black American".
     
  3. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :10500:wait, what? this lady telling me what to call myself? really?
     
  4. Eno Otu

    Eno Otu Prọfesọ nke "Kporie ịda jụụ ahụ" MEMBER

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    I disagree. I do not find the term offensive...I don't care what Caucasians or others do; that is their affair. I would prefer the term "Black" because it unites all who are so-called Negroid regardless of what land we live in or are from.

    I like the fact that things are different for us than Whites (they just call themselves "Americans.") I do not want to be like Whites.

    Peace.
     
  5. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Isn't preferring the term Black a part of being like Whites, a mistake they made by identifying by color. You must understand that Whites claimed America before they began calling themselves White. After they bought us over as slaves, they eventually began calling themselves White to distinguish your dark skin from theirs, keeping us in slavery, thus calling us the furthest color from white, which was black. However it seems the system of White supremacy comes with a price, as America is in decline and in the process of imploding on itself.

    Personally, I don't see how we can call ourselves Black without eventually falling into the same sickness as Whites, that's if we ever get to become as powerful after calling ourselves that. At first I didn't want to believe that, but now I have no choice but to, when I see how we still think. Only a week ago, I heard a Doctor on the Carl Nelson show saying he had scientific evidence that the darker the skin of a man, the more muscular inclined he was. I was hoping he was only comparing African-American men to White men. But when he finished by saying the darker the berry the sweeter the juice, he obviously meant more to it. I wonder what Muhammad Ali, George Foreman, and the late Ken Norton would have thought of that...but I ain't going there. He may as well as said the darker the skin on a woman, the more manly she was, or the rounder her butt was, or the more butt she had...talking about opening a can of worms. But he didn't go there. Instead he sympathized light-skinned females challenges they faced, and the mistreatment she encounters going throw life as a light-skinned woman. I think this came off the discussion of Oprahs "Light Girl" documentary that aired not too long before this interview.

    So I said all that to let you know where a lot of Black peoples heads still are, and this can include some of our so-called smartest. But when you think about it, no wonder we can't unify high-yellow, red-bone, light-brown, brown, or dark-brown, if we going to call our selves Black, and continue to feed the darker you are the better, which I don't think is ever going away, and will always resurface here or there. To me, this only creates more division and competition in our race as long as we stay too hung up on identifying by color, and claim that as our geographical name, which makes no sense, due to the fact you will never find Black on the globe anyway. There shouldn't be anything wrong with claiming Black I guess in a sense. But because of our mindsets as African-Americans under White supremacy, there will always be a group who secretly or upfront think they are Blacker than you simply because they have darker skin, and its impossible for those with that mindset not to, going by that name. Then you'll have to ask over again what Black really is in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015
  6. Eno Otu

    Eno Otu Prọfesọ nke "Kporie ịda jụụ ahụ" MEMBER

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    Peace.

    I only read the first sentence of your post, but no, using the term "Black" is not like White people, I think...if I'm not mistaken, the words "Kemet (the original name of 'Egypt,')" and "Sudan" etymologically refer to skin color; so, Blacks identified by skin color before becoming acquainted with the Caucasians, if I'm not mistaken.
     
  7. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I heard this before. But this isn't the same thing we're dealing with today when it comes to skin color and White Supremist, who called themselves White to keep their kind separate from us, and hold us in slavery. I guess Kemet or Egypt was first, then they called their skin Black. However you can still find Egypt (Kemet) on the globe, but not Black. Somebody must have took our Black pride before. As an earlier poster said, black is really just an adjective. One way or another, who ever these people were, they eventually lost their power.

    When we were brought over as slaves, we were Africans, and identified as such for a long time before they brought us over here. That's why I don't get to tied up with what was going on in Ancient Egypt and tie it to what's happening today as far as identifying as Black. When the White man came to Africa for the slave trade, I can't think of a reason why anybody in Africa would have been calling themselves Black with all those shades of brown. Now I see they may have called the White men White because of there lack of pigmentation. But calling themselves Black during this time doesn't seem likely. Maybe some did, I forgot if I read that somewhere. I'll have to look into that again. However, I still question what was behind Kemet (Egypt) and the Black skin reference back then. Who were they comparing their skin too. Some say the black mud. But why would the first people on the planet, or people during that ancient time, care what color their skin was to the point they would have to identify by it, especially if there were no white people around. That doesn't even make sense today to me, unless God came down and told them to call them selves Black because some lighter skinned invaders were coming.

    Speaking of Ancient Egyptians, they even once wore afros, but that's not what they called them. But when we wore our hair as such in the 70's, and called it the afro, most of Africa looked at us like we were crazy whether you know this or not. It was even outlawed in some countries. Again, these were different times in history.

    By the way, I'm not sure whether to call it an insult that you didn't read my entire post, before responding. But no big deal, perhaps it's late...that it is. Well I'm out.

    Peace.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015
  8. Eno Otu

    Eno Otu Prọfesọ nke "Kporie ịda jụụ ahụ" MEMBER

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    Peace, brother.

    No, I did not mean it as an insult...i just have a very short attention span sometimes when it comes to reading posts that I consider lengthy.
     
  9. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    No problem. By the way, I'm not trying to be argumentative. I'm just trying to put this thing together based on what I've learned so far. I'll always have more room to learn, and that can be from all of us.
     
  10. Eno Otu

    Eno Otu Prọfesọ nke "Kporie ịda jụụ ahụ" MEMBER

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    Peace & Love, my brother.
     
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