Pan Africanism : WHY IS AFRICA STILL POOR?

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Isaiah, Oct 7, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ARTICLE FROM THE AFRICA LEADER...

    posted October 6, 2005 (October 24, 2005 issue)
    Why Is Africa Still Poor?
    Andrew Rice

    A slogan painted on trucks and taxicabs all over Africa, much beloved by metaphor-hunting authors, reads: NO CONDITION IS PERMANENT. This is true, but some are recurring. Tyranny in Zimbabwe, famine in Niger, a constitutional coup in Togo, rampant corruption in Kenya, protesters shot in Ethiopia, an epidemic in Angola, civil war in Sudan--those are this year's headlines, but if you think you've heard it all before, you have. Martin Meredith, in his new book The Fate of Africa, writes that "what is so striking about the fifty-year period since independence is the extent to which African states have suffered so many of the same misfortunes." Some countries, like Nigeria and Zambia, have gone through cycles of reform and decay. But Meredith's subtitle--From the Hopes of Freedom to the Heart of Despair--sums up the overall trend. It's hard to imagine now, but in the heady days of the 1960s, much of the continent was no less prosperous than South Korea or Malaysia. While those Asian nations have transformed themselves into economic "tigers," however, gross domestic products across Africa shrank during the last two decades of the twentieth century. Africans are getting poorer, not richer. They are living shorter, hungrier lives.

    The decline of an entire continent confounds our preconceptions about human advancement. The economist Jeffrey Sachs points out in his recent book The End of Poverty that our Hegelian notion of linear progress is relatively new. For most of history, humans lived miserable existences and couldn't expect better before the afterlife. But since the Industrial Revolution the situation has improved, and not only in the rich countries of Europe and North America. Between 1981 and 2001, Sachs says, hundreds of millions of people, many of them in Asian nations like China and India, emerged from extreme poverty. But a billion have been left behind, most of them in Africa. "The greatest tragedy of our time," Sachs writes, is that one-sixth of all humans still live a dollar-a-day existence, scraping by on the margins of starvation.

    How can one continent be so out of step with humankind's march of progress? Everyone agrees that Africans are desperately poor and typically endure governments that are, to varying degrees, corrupt and capricious. The dispute is about causes and consequences. One group--call it the poverty-first camp--believes African governments are so lousy precisely because their countries are so poor. The other group--the governance-first camp--holds that Africans are impoverished because their rulers keep them that way. The argument may seem pedantic, but there are billions of dollars at stake, and millions of lives. The fundamental question is whether those who are well-off can salve a continent's suffering, or if, for all our good intentions, Africans are really on their own.



    http://story.africaleader.com/p.x/ct/9/id/2fdf9a522d629f74/cid/c1ab2109a5bf37ec/
     
  2. Riada

    Riada Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't think we need to look any farther than ourselves to answer this.
    Before everyone here jumps on that ‘white folks are to blame for Africa’s poverty,’ wagon, let me say that we can trace just about any major problem Blacks have to self-hatred, Blacks devaluing Black-related things, and the habit of Blacks not supporting other Blacks. Yes, white folks set the program in motion, but we can change so much of that program IF WE MAKE THE EFFORT.

    So, IMO, Africa is poor because of its leaders. Its leaders suffer from self-hatred and Black devaluation. How else can you explain how so many billions of Africa’s money is in European and American banks? So just like the money of African Americans end up in the hands of white folks here, Africa’s money goes to Europeans for the same reasons.

    Now I know it’s easy to blame white folks for this, but when I give my money in a white bank or to a white merchant or white doctor or lawyer, I’m doing that of my own free will. No one is forcing me to do that. I could put my money in a Black bank, but I don’t make the effort to do that. That’s MY fault. It’s true that there is no Black bank within 125 miles of where I live, but I could bank by mail or via the internet with a Black bank. I could buy a car from a Black dealership, but I don’t make the effort (travel the distance) to do so. That’s MY fault. When I go out to dinner, I could always eat at a Black restaurant, but I don’t make the effort (travel) to do so. That’s MY fault. And on and on. I do search out Black doctors when I or anyone in my family needs medical help, and I patronize some other Black businesses and services, but I could do a lot more to put my money in the hands of other Blacks rather than give it to white folks, IF I MADE THE EFFORT and that’s MY fault if I don’t.

    I suspect that everyone reading this could put a lot more of their money into the hands of other Black businesses and professionals IF YOU MAKE THE EFFORT. The answer or solution to our problem is in US.
     
  3. kente417mojo

    kente417mojo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wow, now that's what I call truth. We should be doing better. Not only in Africa, but right here within the U.S. We are the cure to our own illness.
     
  4. SUN OF RA

    SUN OF RA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    In order to overstand the demise of the greatest civilization the world has ever known, you must overstand the history behind the demise. We must always strive to tell things as they are. We should never make excuses when it comes to the history of African people. If the truth sounds like excuses, then I have no control over what the truth is. There is absolutely no way that you can dismiss white supremacy as a means as to why Africans fail and are failing globally. For those who don't overstand the system of white supremacy, everything else you think you overstand will only confuse you (Neely Fuller). Let's not confuse ourselves because most of us don't overstand that this system we all are under is included in all forms of people activity (economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex and war).

    African leaders are ignorant to the fact that the future of the country depends on looking at the past and learning from the framework that was laid down as a starting point of civilization. The challenge is to incoporate the guidelines and blueprints of the past into what we currently have here in this present day and time. All throughout the entire continent of Africa, there is not one government currently in place that mirrors the ancient spiritual, culutural, economic and "just" systems of our past. The Africa of today is too busy trying to fit in "political" and "cultural" attire that doesn't fit Africa's needs because they are not based on the "just" systems of traditional African governments of the past. In short - they were not made for us.

    Africa began to crumble when she departed from reciprocity, which is based on equality between men and women as far as society. However, the heart of reciprocity is equality between giver and receiver (two traders), and the equality between the product and the price of the product. From a political standpoint, reciprocity is when leaders and followers are equal. This is when leaders follow the people's will and, in turn, the people support the leaders who serves as their "voices". Unfortunately, it was the inequality and disharmony between Africans which led to the abandonment of reciprocity. Needless to say the islamic slave trade and the Western slave trade did not help this "unjust" injustice.

    Perhaps the greatest creation of "inequality" came at the hands of the european slavers. But another inequality was created among the African men and women, as a result. Africa's economy became the european economy, while millions of Africans became a source of free labor and raw materials. To this very day, any African nation has to go through a world economy dominated and controlled by the west in order to find ther independence. What this means is that the price of African products is being determined by "outsiders". However, it is the mental and pyschological dependence, moreso than the economic dependence, that has led too many of our people globally to lack confidence in themselves. So-called "western civilization" has really done a number on the self-confidence of Africans throughout the world. Instead of incorporating ancient systems of "just" and male-female equality into our lives (which has proven to stand the test of time), western individualism and materialism rules everything around us locally and globally.





    Htp.u
     
  5. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is a brilliant analysis, brilliant!

    HeTePu
     
  6. Riada

    Riada Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I agree with your historical analysis which you expressed quite eloquently. But our plight in the here and now largely comes down to, as you say, ‘Black mental and psychological dependence’ on whites which is another way of saying that those African leaders and other ordinary Blacks around the world don’t value and don’t depend on self or our own group to solve our problems.

    Most of those leaders are arrogant, egotistical, selfish, coldhearted murderers! I've met some of their relatives and cronies. There is a method to their madness. They simply don't care. And even if some of them do what they do due to ignorance, whose fault is that? Surely we don't expect white folks to teach them any better. IMO, those leaders have a vested interest in remaining ignorant, if their bad leadership stems from ignorance. If they really had their peoples' best interests at heart, they would step down when they see that they don't have the skills to build their country or keep their people from suffering like wounded animals and dying like flies. But their egos and greed stop them from doing that. We have got to stop excusing them as if they're not even adults or as if they are retarded. They are exhibiting self-hatred and self-devaluation in the PRESENT and destroying us all. Personally, I don't think there's is anything too bad to do some of those leaders!!


    However, even after we know each blow-by-blow account of history, we must focus on the present and future. We are not responsible for what white folks did to us yesterday, but we are responsible for what we do today to change it for today and for the future. We must relate to each other differently in a very consciously different manner. We must stop this self-hating. We must ACT differently. Even before we talk to each other or interact with each other, we need to ask ourselves: Is this statement or action going to promote, retard, or destroy in any way my advancement and those of other Black folks.

    I am very familiar with Neely Fuller and his teachings about white supremacy. I guess most, of us here, are. Many Black folks are very knowledgeable by now about what happened to us, but knowledge is not the same as actions. We must ACT differently towards each other, now and in the future, because people are judged by their actions or lack of actions, not by what they know, or think, or feel.

    As a side issue, you expressed that our (Black) part in our historical downfall was due to lack of equality between men and women or lack of reciprocity. I agree. If we just look at this issue of inequality between men and women in Africa and in the Diaspora, it is men who drive this issue and enforce this inequality for their pleasure and benefit. Now, I don’t mean this to sound like I’m pointing the finger at men, but I sometimes wonder why it is that “conscious” men on this board and in general don’t focus a lot more of their efforts on changing the attitudes and behavior of other men insofar as inequality is concerned.
     
  7. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    And what is your proof that "concious" men aren't doing this?

    I would ask you to give examples of what these men say, but I think you prefer to make accusations without giving the other person the courtesy of directly confronting them.

    It's starting to look like you have a problem with a few members on this board
     
  8. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister Riada, and Brother Kente Mojo, let's not leap to the same conclusions drawn by this writer and his reference sources... White people have a tendency to act mystified by their findings, because almost all of their findings are "found" with their preconceptions in full effect...(smile!)

    What I mean by this is, a Dr. Walter Rodney, who wrote the acclaimed book, HOW EUROPE UNDERDEVELOPED AFRICA, is NEVER quoted, and probably was not included in their research. That is because they come into their conclusions with a predisposition to BLAME Africa and AFrican leaders without ever seeing themselves or EUROPEANS as central figures in a centuries long raping of African resources and African people... They do not see how, for example, the Central Intelligence Agency murdered good - even great - African leaders with a plan for Africa,like Nkrumah and Lumumba and Biko and Mandela, who they locked up for 27 years... Y'all didn't notice that interesting piece of information they "conveneiently:" left out of their article???(smile!)

    I cannot wait for brothe PANAFRICA OR sister FANYAMBO or brother Omowale or Militant to get involved in this discussion... They are better versed on African history than I am... But I know, and y'all know, that African leadership is not, for the most part, picked and selected by African people... South and Central American leadership is not, for the most part, selected by the people... Caribbean leadership is not selected by the people... It is selected by the European powers, who cannot leave such impoprtant decisions to THE PEOPLE... THE PEOPLE given the opportunity to select their own leadership, might select Allende, Castro, Chavez, Lumumba, and Nkrumah, and this cannot be left to chance... The UNITED STATES and its allies have determined that we should get MBOTU's and AMIN's and BATISTAS,and ABACHA's, and that is whom we get...

    So, people, be circumspect and unemotional about this... Yes, we do have responsibility in kicking out the EUROPEANS and ARABS from our decison-making process, but we cannot blame ourselves alone... We've got to see the hidden hand behind the selection of these so-called leaders...


    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  9. kente417mojo

    kente417mojo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I definately would not blame Africa alone, but I also would not shift any blame from African leaders. I'm not really versed extensively on African history, but I don't think white people could conquer and continue to dominate black people in America and black people in Africa without the help of black people. I just don't see it. No one is that powerful. I don't like making excuses for the bad judgements and actions that people display. I don't make excuses for Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton or any other "black leaders" that could make a difference in the lives of black people world wide, not just in the U.S if only thy'd get their head out of the white man's @ss and stop thinking about themselves. The same goes for African leaders. These people know what they're doing. They are not all under the white man's spell. They know right from wrong. The problem is, as much as the white man has screwed us throughout the years, we've had numerous black leaders standing behind handing them vasoline, watching and cheering them on.
     
  10. Riada

    Riada Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Actually I should have said "more" of the conscious men because I do know of men in my community who speak against men using their maleness to take advantage of women.
     
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