Black Spirituality Religion : Why are Black folk Obsessed with Egypt?

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by diakonos, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. diakonos

    diakonos Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I’ve noticed in this forum (and others just like it) that the only African traditional religion ever discussed is Egyptian/Kemetic theology. Not that I have anything against that belief system, but it is/was not the only religion practiced in Africa. Furthermore, the “blackness” of Egypt (and other Northern African countries for that matter) is highly debatable anyway. Granted, according to American standards (where one drop of black blood makes you black), Egyptians (ancient and present day) are Black. However, it must be stated for the record that Egyptians are of a mixed ancestry. Black Africans live below the Sahara. I’m sure that many will disagree with me on that point, so let me get to my next point.

    The greatest percentage of Africans enslaved for the “New World” labor came from West Africa. So why does no one ever want to discuss any of the religions of Sub-Saharan Africa, or West Africa (which is were most African Americans come from)? Wouldn’t it make more sense to discuss the Yoruba religion (for example) if we were really interested in discussing the beliefs of our ancestors? Why does no one ever want to discuss the religions of Africans in the diaspora like African-Caribbean religions?

    Just something to think about.
     
  2. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This coming from a member with a Greek name, on an African Centered website. Very interesting
     
  3. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    i would like to hear about black people with nappy hair and thick lips and big noses who looked like me.
    i ask just where was Kemet and did those people look like me?
    were they black?
     
  4. SUN OF RA

    SUN OF RA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    First of all there is a difference between "egyptian" and "Kamau". The original inhabitants of the place what we call "egypt" were known as the "Kamau". The place we now call "egypt" was called "KMT"(Kamit, Kamet, Kemet), which means "land of the blacks". Kamit was conquered by invaders, which ended the Kamitic empire. This downfall led to the rise of the "egyptian" people, who settled in the land and remained after each conquest from the Arabic influence to that of the Romans.

    One thing we must remember is that all ATR are relative and essentially the same. For example, in Keneset and Kamit we have the term Ka, in Akan we have Kra (okra), in Yoruba we have Ori (ori inu), in Ewe we have Se. All of these terms describe the drop of the Supreme Being's consciousness/soul dwelling within your spirit.

    The Akan, Ewe Vodoun, Yoruba and Igbo are just 4 of the many African groups who have continued the priestly societies unbroken for over 10,000 years.

    All of our ancestral traditions are rooted in the ritual incorporation of 'Divine Law' and the ritual restoration of Divine Balance. This is the essence of
    African ancestral religion. All of our cultural expressions reflect these things: the nature of our clothing, our names, our languages, the designs of our homes, shrines, temples, villages, our food selections and preparations, observances of taboos, our ceremonies, songs, dances, use of oils, incense, stones, gems, plants, animals, etc.





    Htp.u
     
  5. IssaEl21

    IssaEl21 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Istanjaay - Ila - Antuk < Sun Of Ra >


    I See You Have Done Your HomeWork As Always , Very Good :toast:
     
  6. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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    SEK's statement serves as the perfect seque into my response to this:

    Being that Africa was not this territorialized, regional place that people treat it as today, but rather as a more or less diverse continent with cultural, linguistic and philosophical variations along the same universal theme, Kemet (NOT EGYPT; that is as Greek as your screen name) represented the crown of Mother Uhuru.

    Thus, the means of reclaiming this crown for our people, must be no less systematic as the means utilized in taking it from us.

    We must use history, culture, language, religion, science, arts, and most importantly geneology as the foundation for such a reclamation.

    Otherwise, we do our ancestors of that land a great disservice, in fattening frogs for snakes, by giving our rich heritage over to the Eurasian man.


    This is absolutely RIDICULOUS, these assertions that you have made. This sounds like the non-sense that 1800's so-called "Egyptologists" tried to make, when they stole Kemet from our people in the first place.

    Let us review some info:

    *Ancient Kemet was a far more vast land, in terms of land mass, than it's contemporary ("EGYPT") is now today. While the latter only represents a small jigsaw puzzle piece at the northeastern most tip of Africa, Kemet extended as far south as modern-day Tanzania, and as far west as modern-day Chad, and as far north as modern-day Lebanon.

    Black people ruled, from all areas in between.

    *The Sahara itself does not serve as some cultural marker. The idea is utterly absurd. For that matter, prior to several thousand years ago, it barely served as a geological marker, since much of North Africa was a lush as the south.

    In the meantime, Blacks from various tribes inhabited and ruled all parts of the continent.

    *Geneologically speaking, it is also a myth that Sub-Saharan Blacks are a different "race or species" from Saharan Blacks. Just like the Mediteranean White man is not an altogether different being from his Nordic Brother, neither is the Massai different from the Wolof, neither of which are different from the Sabean, or the Tutsi.

    The white man unites with himself, along all the aspects of the European spectrum, while he convinces us (and other people of color) to divide along the African and Asian spectrum.

    What you are speaking of here is no different.

    Further, people who make the claim about Modern day Egypt being culturally and racially detached from the rest of Africa has apparently never been there and doesn't know what they're talking about; there are indigenous Nubians who are striving in their plight that are alive and well on a cultural, linguistic, ethnic and even philosophical level to this very day.

    http://www.nubiatoday.info/NUBIA TODAY.htm

    Like the other myths you have asserted here, those of us who are familiar with ATR's know the universality of them all, and thus to speak of one, is to speak of them all.

    When I speak of Metu Neter, I am in essence speaking of IFA or YORUBA, because each of those systems teach that the Divine reality behind them all, is that they are all intrinsic to each other, and to the whole.

    If I were a Christian, and chose only to identify with the Episcopalian aspect of Christanity, and rarely or never speak about Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, etc.....No one here would question my position on Christianity, or whether I am somehow betraying the Biblical legacy.

    It is only the European, Judeo-Christian notion that a different religion means a different God. Some of the names for God(s) in each of these systems are precisely the same, save the minor differences in dialect.

    Speaking of which, CHEIKH ANTA DIOP had already laid the foundation, as well as dispelled the myths about how cultural and ethnic unity is identified in Africa, both ancient and modern.

    Speaking of the Trans-Atlantic slaves, DIOP had already established that there is more than a casual linguistic relationship between the WOLOF language system and ancient KEMAU (which has survived by way of SAEEDI and COPTIC dialects).

    His theory is that after the Arabs and Europeans invaded and destroyed Kemet, that many Kemetic Africans diaspored further into the continent, and established themselves within other smaller societies. This is not an uncommon phenomenon amongst native peoples; Native Americans althroughout their history did this.


    Further, on an anthropological basis, there are numerous artifacts that survive in West Africa that are allegedly indigenous to ancient Kemet, such as the Ankh and the Sistrum.

    The only possible explanations for this, are either:

    #1) That Kemetian Africans brought these artifacts, and the ideas that they represent with them on their diaspora,

    AND/OR

    #2) That these people, along with their ideas, culture, language, beliefs, etc were spectrally universal from the very beginning.

    Remember; the Kemau came from the "Valley" and settled along the Nile. That valley had always been the interior of Africa.

    Lest we forget, that "Kemet" means "Land of the Blacks".......

    So does EGYPT in Greek, by the way.

    SHEM HOTEPU
     
  7. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    was north Africa occupied by black skinned people with big lips and noses who looked like me?
     
  8. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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    Yes, and numerous tribes: TUAREG, NUBIANS and others.
     
  9. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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    By the way DIAKONOS, I have a few Q's and fyi's for you

    #1) Various other traditional ATR's have indeed been discussed on here. There have indeed been VODUN, IFA and YORUBA threads in this section.

    #2) If you feel that these systems have not been discussed in detail, perhaps you can inform us about them. How much about various ATR's are you knowledgeable about?

    #3) What precisely is your cultural/ethnic heritage?

    #4) Where do you think these people: http://www.nubiatoday.info/bilder/kvinnor.jpg
    Come from? North or South of the Sahara?

    PEACE
     
  10. diakonos

    diakonos Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm the one asking the questions in this thread Samurai36. And by the way, no one has really answered it. Instead, some of you have chosen the debate ethnicity of Egyptians (a point that I stated from the very beginning most of you wouldn’t agree with).

    By the way, I wasn’t trying to imply that there weren’t any black skinned people in Egypt (or northern Africa). I simply stated that they were of a mixed stock/ancestry (and they are). They range the spectrum from light-olive based skin toned, with high-bridged narrow noses to darker skinned people with more “Negroid” features. Hence the term “mixed.” Regardless of the color or racial make up of the Ancient Egyptians, it still doesn’t change the fact that most of us descended from Africans in Sub-Saharan West Africa. That speaks more to the geographic location of our ancestors than their color (for those of you who have a problem with me classifying the ancient Egyptians as mixed).

    Sun Of Ra,

    You made an interesting point:

    I agree with everything you said, but here is the question I’m asking. Why is it that in this forum, no one ever starts a thread about the Akang, Ewe, Vodun, Yoruba or Igbo (or the beliefs of African-Caribbean people)? As great of a Civilization as ancient Kemet was (the crown jewel of Africa as some one put it), it is not the only great civilization that existed in Africa. That’s all I’m saying.
     
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