Black People : Why All Black People Of Voting Age Should Still Vote!

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by carlhurd, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. carlhurd

    carlhurd Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Why All Black People Of Voting Age Should Still Vote!


    1) Because the establishment do not expect us to.

    2) Because the establishment has done and will continue to discourage and disenfranchise as much as possible.

    3) If some one goes through all the trouble of deceptive and disruptive practices, then voting must be important or they would not waste the time or resources to do anything, so voting must mean something.

    4) At one time our people weren’t allowed to vote; just to honor those who gave their lives and limbs should be motivation enough.

    5) Our children watch what we do when they see us they will follow. To let them know that even through all the trouble we have gone through and may continue to go through We Still Have a Voice!

    6) If we don’t stand for something we will continue to fall for anything.

    7) Many Black people don’t have anything to lose anyway, we should do it Just Because We Can!

    8) Because the establishment don’t want us to.

    9) Black men should because we need to send a message as men.

    10) Black women should just to say we stand behind our men.

    11) Vote for all the brothers and sisters who can’t, ex-felons who lost their rights to vote even after they served their time for their crime 1out of 5 black men not allowed to vote, because of ex-felon law.

    Now we have NO EXCUSE !
     
  2. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    My answer to this is; Go read my post in the I.R.S. thread. It's really that simple. If you can't understand that then you don't have a reason to vote at all.
     
  3. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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  4. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I agree with this post.

    However, a few others have nothing to offer but excuses and more weak arguments to divert attention from What Must Be Done. Stay Vigilent and Don't Give Up The Fight!
     
  5. That Jones Boy

    That Jones Boy Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I am still not convinced yes voting can be important give me a king or a Mendella heck even Sharpleton to vote for then yeah I can see it.

    But one cracka party or another both thinking pretty much the same like last election a choice to vote was between a redneck and some dude that can't even make up his mind what he thinks.
    The importance of having the right to vote I get but chosing between a redneck and a what the heck I can't see the point to.
     
  6. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    http://www.votefraud.org/

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/features/usacoup.html

    http://www.salon.com/opinion/feature/2006/09/21/no_right_to_vote/
    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/voting/intro/intro_a.htm

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1365/is_5_36/ai_n15928047


    The Right to Vote

    The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not
    be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

    — Fifteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1870)

    The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not
    be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.
    — Nineteenth Amendment (1920)

    The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any
    primary or other election . . . shall not be denied or abridged . . . by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.— Twenty-fourth Amendment (1964)

    The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of age.— Twenty-sixth Amendment (1971)

    Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (1835)

    Once a people begins to interfere with the voting qualification, one can be sure that sooner or later it will abolish it altogether. That is one of the most invariable rules of social behavior. The further the limit of voting rights is extended, the stronger is the need felt to spread them still wider, for after each new concession the forces of democracy are strengthened, and its demands increase with the augmented power. The ambition of those left below the qualifying limit increases in proportion to the number of those above it. Finally the exception becomes the rule; concessions follow one another without interruption, and there is no halting place until universal suffrage has been attained.
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Amen! :toast:
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.project2019.com/faques5.htm

    ...There are three major reasons why black Americans should consider voting as not only a cherished right but also as a sacred duty.

    A Price To Be Paid
    The first reason is exemplified by the maxim “eternal vigilance is the price of liberty.” Black America has won its struggle for civil rights and there are no obvious reasons for black Americans to believe there will ever be any wholesale abrogation of these rights. Given the current laws and a track record of conscientious and equitable enforcement of these laws, there would seem to be little danger of black America being forced back into the Jim Crow era from which it emerged in the 1960’s. Yet, nothing in life is guaranteed.

    During the twentieth century, no less than ten million people were killed in conflicts throughout the world simply because they did not share the same race, religion, or ethnicity of those who were in power. This does not include the millions who were killed because they did not share the same race, religion, or ethnicity of those who were attempting to gain power.

    In America, voting is the single best way for all Americans, and especially black Americans, to protect the rights they have won. In an autocracy, it is the gun and the bullet – the force of arms – that sustains unlimited government power. In representative democracies like America, it is the vote that legitimizes and directs those who govern, thereby limiting the power of government. Indeed, it is the power, or the lack of power, of the vote that defines various forms of government. Voting is the “vigilance,” the price that all Americans must pay at every possible opportunity to maintain our system of government. This is especially true for black Americans. Voting is the best way, if not the only way, to ensure that the victories won by black America will endure.

    A Lesson To Be Learned (Why Blacks Do Not Vote)
    The second reason why all black Americans should vote in every possible election is that every single vote cast by a black American is important because every single vote has value. This is contrary to what many black Americans have been brainwashed into believing – that their one vote does not matter.

    It is important to note that “voting” is not necessarily the same as “getting involved in the political process” or even “being an informed voter.” “Voting” is going to the polls on Election Day, marking a ballot, and placing it in the ballot box. In a perfect world, more black Americans would be involved in the political process, more black Americans would study the issues and the candidates, and more black Americans would make informed, prudent choices when they vote. However, in the imperfect world in which we live, if black Americans do none of these things, they should still vote.

    If none of the candidates are thought to be worthy of being elected, black Americans should choose the least objectionable candidate and vote for that candidate. If black Americans choose to vote for a Democratic Party candidate because they always have, they should vote for that candidate. If they choose to vote for a Republican Party candidate because they agree with his or her platform, they should vote for that candidate. If black Americans choose to vote for third party or fourth party candidates, or even write-in their own names, they should do so. When it comes to voting, it does matter if black Americans are informed, somewhat informed, or uninformed. But there is one thing that matters more. When it comes to voting, black Americans should “just vote.”

    Needless to say, for the elitists who believe that only “qualified” segments of the population should be responsible for the election of our political leaders, the “just vote” approach will seem extreme and even dangerous to the electoral process. It is not. For others, the “just vote” approach will be seen as unwise or unhealthy for the electoral process. It is not.

    Those who would argue that the “just vote” approach is dangerous or unhealthy are, more likely than not, the serious voters, those who vote in every possible election. They may be informed, knowledgeable voters or they may simply be partisans of a particular political party or specific issues. In any case, the bottom line is that a small percentage of voters are responsible for the election of most American politicians and these voters have no incentive or desire to share their power with those who, in their opinion, are uninformed or uninitiated. The only new voters they trust are ones they can count on to support their political party or their partisan agenda.

    There is only one argument that can be made against the “just vote” approach. It is that the “most qualified” candidate could lose to a lesser-qualified candidate. But who, except for a majority of voters, is to say which candidate is the most qualified candidate. Indeed, after almost every election held in America today, between forty-five and forty-nine percent of voters are convinced that the “least qualified” candidate won. And most of these voters are amazed at the stupidity of the fifty-one to fifty-five percent of voters who selected the “wrong man” or the “wrong woman” for that office.

    There are arguments to be made for black Americans adopting the “just vote” approach to voting. The first is that it will make candidates more accountable for what they should be doing in order to get elected. Candidates would be forced to expand their platforms and campaigns to address the concerns of a broader segment of the population. And they would have to do a better job of communicating with and convincing more voters that they deserve to be elected. In the end, it would be more difficult for a politician to win an election by simply catering to his or her core support base.

    Black Americans must understand that politics in America is driven by the same market forces – supply and demand – that drive most systems in a capitalistic society. For example, if it were discovered that twenty-five to thirty year-old black women had ten billion dollars more disposal income than previously known, American businesses would immediately come up with additional products and services to try to sell to twenty-five to thirty year-old black women. Likewise, if two or three million additional black Americans suddenly began to vote in every possible election, politicians would quickly come up with “products and services” directed toward these black Americans.

    Black Americans must also understand that there is no such thing as a wrong vote and the only wasted vote is a vote that is not cast. A vote that is not cast does not matter. Politicians, therefore, can not afford to waste their time, energy, or resources on non-voters. Clearly, it is in their best interest to concentrate their efforts on voters because voters are twice as important as non-voters are. Not only can a voter penalize a candidate by not giving the candidate his or her vote, the voter also penalizes the candidate by giving his or her vote to the candidate’s opponent. For this reason, many candidates depend on a low voter turnout and even include it as part of their election strategy.

    Even with black Americans comprising less than fifteen percent of the total population of the United States, there would be an immediate response from politicians if just sixty percent of all eligible black Americans suddenly started voting. If seventy or eighty percent started voting in every election, politicians would be lining up in black communities to ask what they can do to earn the black vote. But until black Americans begin to vote in larger numbers, or until there is more diversity in the black vote, there is little or no incentive for Democrats or Republicans to change the way they regard the black vote. Democrats know that, regardless of what they do or fail to do, they will receive between eighty and ninety percent of the black vote. And Republicans know they simply have to compensate for this consistently underrepresented block of black voters by addressing the needs and concerns of other, non-black blocks of voters.

    A Debt To Be Paid
    The third reason why black Americans should regard voting as both a cherished right and a sacred duty is the long and agonizing struggle that was required for black Americans to obtain the right to vote.

    Thousands of dedicated and determined black and white Americans made incredible sacrifices in order to win and secure this fundamental right of democracy for black America. And thousands of brave men, women, and children died in the struggle. A cloud of shame will hang over black America as long as it allows the sacrifices that were made and especially the lives that were lost to have been in vain. If there was ever a day that a black American had a reason for regrets or to be ashamed, it was the last Election Day that he or she did not vote.

    Black Americans can accomplish three very important objectives by simply voting in every possible election. They can preserve the rights that black America has already obtained. They can ensure that black America gets its fair share of benefits and services that are made available to the American public. And they can show their appreciation and respect to those who fought and died so that black Americans could freely exercise their right to vote. Considering the amount of time and effort involved – as little as one or two hours once or twice a year – voting is a small price to pay for such important dividends.

    Black Americans are encouraged to get involved in the political process or become better informed, more knowledgeable voters. But the minimum that black Americans must do is to vote in every possible election.
    It bears repeating. If there was ever a day that a black American had a reason for regrets or to be ashamed, it was the last Election Day that he or she did not vote.
     
  9. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    bot
    ..





    ..
     
  10. Black-king

    Black-king Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black Folks have been voting for ages now, yet we are still at the bottom of society.Wake up folks voting is not for you Black people .
     
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