Black People : Who needs Ebonics?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Amnat77, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Monday Aug 30, 2010 – By Zettler Clay

    It’s been a thorn in the side of grammar snobs everywhere. Drop a wire into any conversation in any urban or informal setting in any Black American household and take note. Then try duplicating it in academic circles and see if you aren’t met with the swiftest look of consternation.

    Ebonics: It’s what we’re taught to stay away from if we want to be seen as more than primitive beings that warrant dire socialization. However, the subject of debate is now a valued skill set among the federal government. Recently, the Department of Justice placed an Ebonics requirement for its Atlanta Drug Enforcement Agents, to “monitor, translate and transcribe” DEA recordings of drug dealers.

    Nine agents to be exact. In addition, the Atlanta field office needs linguists of the following varieties:

    144 Spanish
    12 Vietnamese
    9 Korean
    9 Farsi
    8 Laotian
    4 Jamaican
    4 Chinese
    4 Igbo

    Either White drug dealers are either already covered, or they don’t pose a threat to the Drug Enforcement Agency. If the criminal justice system didn’t lock up enough minorities before on drug charges, that is certain to change now. Seeing Ebonics on that list should make any person wary of a skewed criminal justice system become more dubious.

    I guess it’s easier to snatch up dealers in doo-rags than in three-piece suits.

    Are Black drug dealers not the lowest rung on the narcotics totem pole? While it’s understandable that officers need to know the language of drug dealers, this requirement is a bit overkill. Dealers speak in codes; slang even. Ebonics isn’t a language taught by Rosetta Stone. So who is going to be hired? This mandate basically states, “We need nine ni–ers who can understand this sh–. Because we can’t.”

    Being specialized in deciphering Ebonics isn’t a deterrent against crime; it’s little more than profiling. It’s obvious that the DEA is fighting to lock more people up or there wouldn’t be a need to bring in “specialists.” However, this does bring to light another issue: Is Ebonics a “legitimate” language?

    In the circles of many homes, the subject of whether Ebonics is a language on par with Spanish rages on—with many parents and teachers asserting that proper English is devoid of Ebonics. Slang is often lumped in with Ebonics, but there is a clear difference between the two: The former deals with syntax and is general; the latter deals with individual words and is race-specific.

    http://clutchmagonline.com/lifeculture/feature/who-needs-ebonics/
     
  2. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    what kind of dealers is these?

    igbo?:10500:
     
  3. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    :10500: I know there there is a heavy Nigerian presence in the cocaine/heroin trade, but I aways thought they were Yorubas.


    Timing of this Ebonics speaker jobs is very interesting i think.
     
  4. StefiA

    StefiA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    OK...
    I know this is going to sound like a dumb question...
    But I thought ebonics was just a way of describing black slang...
    Is it an actual language then? form Africa or something?
     
  5. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't criticize the use of Ebonics...I use it fairly regularly myself. But, purely and simply put---it's still English. If "THEY" can still understand you, then you are still speaking their language--- with a unique twist. This isn't really the focus of this thread, but if Black people want to take back our tongues, we need to learn African languages. Now, there are books on Ebonics, which I admittedly haven't studied but will at some point, but I can't fathom how if you are speaking to nonblacks in Ebonics, and they understand you how it could be certified as an official language. Maybe someone can offer a different perspective. I'm more fascinated by the unique tongue of the Gullah people, but I'm not sure that it would be classified as Ebonics.



     
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    white folk no can understand

    it's a slang or a dialect or somethin......
     
  7. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    They think they are slick and are speaking from both sides of their mouth. On one hand they claimed Ebonics is not a language, it is just slang regulated to the ghettos of black America.

    Ok

    Fast forward to 2010, I presume that most of the taped conversation and wire tapes of black prisoners and regular citizens that they've acquired is useless to them, as the article asserts :''This mandate basically states, “We need nine ni–ers who can understand this sh–. Because we can’t''.

    Another example of the arrogance of Western culture, they set the precedence then change it whenever to suit their agenda.

    i like how they are advertising this job vacancy during a recession.

    Very slick indeed.
     
  8. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Is it just me or do you think folk are making it all up as they go along too?

    :10500:
     
  9. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    Yes a lot of it is made up as they go , one can speak a new term and it spread
    with a means of a new street code , I learn a lot from being out there
    as well some of that fizzo, izzo izik....... pig language
     
  10. bientempo

    bientempo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I would class it as something like they have in England,

    Rhyming Cockney.
    Cockney rhyming slang is not a language but a collection of phrases used by Cockneys and other Londoners

    Rhyming Slang phrases are derived from taking an expression which rhymes with a word and then using that expression instead of the word. For example the word "look" rhymes with "butcher's hook". In many cases the rhyming word is omitted - so you won't find too many Londoners having a "bucher's hook", but you might find a few having a "butcher's".

    if you don't understand it you won't know what they are talking about
     
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