Black People : WHILE BLACK FOLKS SLEEP, WHITE FOLKS CHEAT, CHEAT, AND CHEAT...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Sep 25, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Waste and fraud inevitable in rebuilding, experts say By Seth Borenstein, Knight Ridder Newspapers
    Fri Sep 23, 7:15 PM ET



    WASHINGTON - As the federal government throws tens of billions of dollars into hurricane relief and reconstruction, the system to make sure taxpayers' money is spent properly is a mess.

    The federal purchasing system has been plagued with scandal - its top buyer was arrested Monday. It has too few workers deciding exactly what to buy, and there may not be enough auditors to ensure taxpayers get their money's worth. Even now, rules designed to keep the contracting process fair and honest are being loosened to speed recovery and reconstruction.

    "We are looking at billions going out there. It will be certainly hundreds of millions of dollars at risk," said Bunnatine Greenhouse, who was the Army Corps of Engineers chief contracting officer until last month when she was demoted after complaining about no-bid contracting in Iraq.

    Already, money is being wasted, experts say.

    "There's no doubt, no question, there's going to be fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement - there already has been," Comptroller General David M. Walker told Knight Ridder. He runs the Government Accountability Office, the watchdog arm of Congress.

    Whistle-blowers are hiring attorneys, complaining to law professors and calling federal fraud hot lines.

    Fraud calls "are just starting to flow in these last two weeks," Department of Homeland Security Inspector General Richard Skinner said Friday. "We're getting a lot of calls. It's increasing daily."

    On Thursday, the chief administrative officer for Kenner, La., was accused of malfeasance after police found food, drinks, chain saws and roof tarps - all intended for Hurricane Katrina survivors - at his house.

    President Bush, under pressure to rebuild the devastated Gulf Coast quickly, vowed this week to protect the public treasury.

    "We'll make sure your money is spent wisely," Bush told an applauding crowd Wednesday. "And we're going to make sure that the money is spent honestly by sending a team of inspector generals down there to review all expenditures."

    At the Office of Management and Budget, where procurement policy is set, spokesman Alex Conant said, "We feel that we have the controls in place to prevent abuse and fraud."

    But that's not what more than a dozen experts - current and former contracting officers, auditors, contract law professors, whistle-blowers and members of Congress - say.

    "The government is fighting this war (on waste) with Civil War weapons, and we're just overwhelmed," said Joshua Schwartz, co-director of the George Washington University Law School's government procurement law program. Schwartz pointed to small staffs, limited budgets and weak oversight.

    Even as checks were being written to help the victims of Hurricane Katrina, evidence of corruption within the administration surfaced.

    On Monday, David Safavian - who was administrator of federal procurement policy in the Office of Management and Budget - was arrested and charged with lying to a government ethics officer as part of a burgeoning scandal involving a Washington lobbyist. Safavian, who had been chief-of-staff of the General Services Administration, also was accused of obstructing an inspector general's investigation of the GSA. He resigned three days before being arrested.

    "It has no impact on the Katrina relief effort," OMB spokesman Conant said.

    Safavian isn't the first top purchasing official touched by scandal.

    Darlene Druyun, who had been the U.S. Air Force's acquisition chief, soon will be released from prison after serving a nine-month sentence for conspiring to help Boeing Co. win a multibillion-dollar airplane contract.

    Contracting officials who complain about lax practices - especially at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - have lost their jobs. At least four federal purchasing officials were demoted, fired or resigned under pressure after complaining about no-bid contracts, including some involving Halliburton, the large, politically connected engineering firm once headed by Vice President **** Cheney.

    Greenhouse, the Army Corps whistle-blower, said the retaliation caused "a chill" among contracting officials trying to protect taxpayers from no-bid deals and other waste.

    For more than seven years, Greenhouse was the top Army Corps official responsible for contracting. After complaining, first in-house, then publicly, about no-bid contracts, Greenhouse was demoted Aug. 28, the day before Katrina stuck New Orleans.

    Christy Watts - who spent 12 years as an Army Corps contracting chief in Louisville, Ky.; Charleston, S.C.; and Alaska - was fired last year after complaining about no-bid purchases.

    "Clearly our priorities are perverse," said Danielle Brian, executive director of the Project On Government Oversight, a financial watchdog group in Washington. "Our government punishes the good guys and lets, in some cases, the really bad guys help run the show and set the agendas."

    George Washington University's Schwartz said that reform of the federal purchasing system - begun in the Clinton administration - cut jobs and overburdened those remaining.

    "The system and the work force has a massive case of indigestion," Schwartz said.

    The number of government purchasing agents and contract managers has been cut in half since 1990, but since Sept. 11, 2001, the contract spending they oversee has more than doubled, Schwartz said.

    "We have resources to do $200 billion in contracts, but we are spending $400 billion in contracts," Schwartz said.

    Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairwoman Susan Collins, R-Maine, said the reduction in the contracting work force "does make federal programs more vulnerable to waste and outright fraud."

    In 2003 and 2004, the GAO put the Department of Homeland Security in its "high risk" category for effectiveness because its "procurement activities had not achieved the level of sophistication and control that we had expected," said Norm Rabkin, managing director of the GAO's Homeland Security auditing team.

    Just days after Katrina hit, Congress and the Bush administration increased the limits for purchase on government credit cards - from $2,500 to $250,000.

    That change was "an open invitation to waste, fraud and abuse," said Collins, whose committee Thursday voted to repeal the new $250,000 limit.

    OMB spokesman Conant said there are some restraints. Purchases over $50,000 need authorization from another official, for example.

    To date, $63 billion has been approved for Katrina relief and reconstruction. Of that, $15 million will be used to hire more auditors to review spending. Homeland Security's inspector general corps will have 150 auditors and investigators looking at hurricane spending.

    Homeland Security is one of 13 different departments and agencies to have inspectors general auditing hurricane contracts.

    But that approach may be too diffuse, allowing some waste to fall through the cracks, Collins said.

    She proposes using the highly successful Iraq model of having a single inspector general to oversee spending along the Gulf of Mexico.

    Keith Ashdown, vice president of Taxpayers for Common Sense, said: "We will learn months after the money was wasted or stolen that it was wasted and stolen."

    Knight Ridder correspondents Chris Adams and Ron Hutcheson contributed to this report.


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/krwashburea...3bE_8QF;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl
     
  2. MANASIAC

    MANASIAC Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I wonder will this touch the TV Media at all?

    This is a great article
     
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    WHILE WE ARE SLEEPING...

    THE REAL THUGS!

    Auditors pledge to investigate Katrina contracts
    No-bid pacts will undergo scrutiny, House panel to be told

    Wednesday, September 28, 2005; Posted: 4:38 a.m. EDT (08:38 GMT)

    What Is This? WASHINGTON (AP) -- A day after castigating the federal government's ousted disaster chief, a House panel will hear pledges from government auditors that they will closely examine millions of dollars in contracts the Bush administration awarded to politically connected companies for Hurricane Katrina relief.

    The inspectors general from half a dozen agencies, as well as officials from the Government Accountability Office, on Wednesday were addressing a House subcommittee on the Katrina cleanup and announcing several new audits to combat waste and fraud.

    They are pledging strong oversight that includes a review of no-bid contracts and close scrutiny of federal employees who now enjoy a $250,000 -- rather than a $2,500 -- purchase limit for Katrina-related expenses on their government-issued credit cards.

    "When so much money is available, it draws people of less than perfect character," H. Walker Feaster, inspector general of the Federal Communications Commission, said. "It underscores the need for internal controls of the money going out."

    The joint appearance of government auditors comes amid a flurry of legislation pending in Congress that would create additional layers of oversight to the Katrina contracting and award process.

    It also comes amid growing charges of favoritism that critics say led to government missteps in the wake of the Katrina disaster. (Watch video on accusations of "cronyism" -- 3:18)

    In a House hearing Tuesday, both Republicans and Democrats assailed former Federal Emergency Management Agency Director Michael Brown, who critics say lacked proper experience for the job, for his performance in handling emergency aid.

    "The Bush administration's culture of cronyism comes at the expense of public safety," House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-California, said. "It is unconscionable and must stop immediately."

    In a combative appearance Tuesday, Brown admitted making some mistakes but placed the brunt of the blame on the Louisiana governor, the New Orleans mayor and even the Bush White House that appointed him. (Full story)

    "My biggest mistake was not recognizing by Saturday (two days before Katrina struck) that Louisiana was dysfunctional," Brown told a special panel set up by House Republican leaders to investigate the catastrophe, which killed more than 1,000 people across Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.

    Brown also said he warned Bush, White House chief of staff Andrew Card and deputy chief of staff Joe Hagin that "this is going to be a bad one" in e-mails and phone conversations leading up to the storm.

    Lawmakers strongly disagreed. "I'm happy you left," said Rep. Christopher Shays, R-Connecticut. "Because that kind of, you know, look in the lights like a deer tells me that you weren't capable to do the job."

    Rep. Gene Taylor, D-Mississippi, told Brown: "You get an F-minus in my book."

    Big-money contracts
    On Wednesday, lawmakers turn their attention to the lucrative Katrina contracts.

    In the weeks after the Aug. 29 storm, more than 80 percent of the $1.5 billion in contracts awarded by FEMA for Katrina work were handed out with little or no competition or had open-ended or vague terms that previous audits have cited as being highly prone to abuse.

    They included contracts such as a $16 million deal involving Halliburton subsidiary Kellogg, Brown & Root Services Inc. of Arlington, Virginia, that has been cited for overcharging the government for work in Iraq; and San-Francisco-based Bechtel Corp. Both companies have strong ties to the Bush administration.

    Primary oversight falls to the agency IGs and the GAO, the auditing arm of Congress, but critics have said that isn't enough. The various proposals, including ones from Republican Sen. Susan Collins and Pelosi, the House Democratic leader, call for a specially appointed IG who would oversee all the various agencies' work.

    But in their testimony Wednesday, the inspectors general are expected to say additional review is unnecessary. The GAO and Homeland Security Department IG Richard Skinner have said they would look closely at the no-bid contracts that may have been unfairly awarded based on political connections.

    Pentagon auditors also announced a broad-scale review of their defense contracts. The measures include sending teams of auditors to the Gulf Coast to monitor reconstruction efforts.

    Investigators also will carefully examine whether federal employees have been abusing government-issued credit cards since their purchase limits were hastily raised to $250,000 to help pay for hurricane-related expenses.

    Previous government audits have shown that the credit cards, which typically have a purchase limit of $2,500, were improperly used to pay for prostitutes, gambling activity and even breast implants. About 250,000 federal employees have the government credit cards.

    http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/09/28/congress.katrina.ap/index.html?section=cnn_topstories

    iSAIAH
     
  4. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Great article brotha,

    A criminal is a criminal, we can call thug, gangster whatever. but some criminals have real clout, that's why it's called ORGANIZED crime.
     
  5. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Yes, brother, and we wont seen none of these white folks puttin one another on blast about their larceny and greed... Not one of them got the balls to say that WHITE PEOPLE STEAL MORE THAN ALL OIF THE PEOPLES OF THE WORLD COMBINED - and all of the peoples of the world combined outnumber white folks by how many billions???

    They love crime committed by themselves... They glorify crimes committed by themselves... They even feel it is their birthright to steal... That is why they are always watching us to see if we gone outsteal them... No, that's just not going to be tolerated(smile!)

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  6. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    There are a few exceptions, like George Carlin and Bill Maher ;)
     
  7. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    History of Corruption in Louisiana Stirs Fears That Aid Will Go Astray

    By PETER APPLEBOME and JEREMY ALFORD
    Published: October 1, 2005
    NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 27 - There are plenty of reasons that, after two hurricanes, Louisiana is viewing the coming intersection of the state's politicians and billions of dollars in federal relief aid with almost as much fear as hope. For starters, there is this:.

    Nine months before Hurricane Katrina made landfall, three emergency preparedness officials from Louisiana were indicted, accused of obstruction and lying in connection with the mishandling of $30.4 million in disaster relief money. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has tried unsuccessfully to recover the money after an investigation of a program to buy out homeowners in flood-prone areas.

    Among other problems, federal inspectors said, nearly half a million dollars had been inappropriately spent on items like a trip to Germany, professional dues, computer equipment and a Ford Crown Victoria.

    That $30 million is pocket change compared with perhaps $200 billion in federal money anticipated for rebuilding the Gulf Coast. But as New Orleans gets back to the gargantuan task of trying to become a functioning city again, Louisiana residents - tired, angry and scared after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita - seem every bit as aware of the state's history of corruption and incompetence as of its catastrophic meteorology.

    Griping about government is the national pastime, and nature, not man, caused the storms. But the essential thing to remember as rebuilding New Orleans proceeds is that perhaps no other state has as eccentric and problematic a political culture as Louisiana.

    This, after all, is the state where supporters produced bumper stickers reading "Vote for the Crook. It's Important" to urge a hold-your-nose vote for Edwin W. Edwards for governor in 1991 against the former Klansman David Duke. (Both eventually ended up in prison). It is a place that the author A. J. Liebling described as America's answer to Lebanon, where the chapter on Louisiana in V. O. Key Jr.'s classic book, "Southern Politics in State and Nation," was entitled simply "The Seamy Side of Democracy."

    Unlike, for example, the serial hurricanes that hit Florida last year, Hurricane Katrina and the rebuilding process that will follow are being viewed as being about politics and governing almost as much as about wind and rain.

    People are skeptical enough that when Juan Parke, a computer consultant awaiting Hurricane Rita last week at a bar on Bourbon Street in New Orleans, was asked about how the state would make use of anticipated federal aid, he shrugged and said, "I do believe there's going to be a certain amount of inefficiency and a certain amount of corruption, but even thieves can only use two hands at a time, so there's going to be enough money to make it through to do some good."

    Much has changed since the days of Huey and Earl Long and the heyday of Louisiana as political burlesque, and the state's most prominent current officials have not been touched by scandal. But when the theme in Baton Rouge for the 2003 Spanish Town Mardi Gras, an annual blend of merriment and political satire, was "Louisiana Purchase: Name Your Price," one did not need to be an expert on state politics to get the joke.

    Several recent state officials, in fact, have spent time behind bars. Mr. Edwards is serving a 10-year federal prison sentence for extorting money from applicants for riverboat casino licenses. Jerry Fowler, a former elections commissioner, recently served a four-year bribery sentence; and Jim Brown, a former insurance commissioner, was released from a federal prison in 2003 after becoming the third insurance commissioner in a row to go to prison.

    And the officials charged last fall, including two senior employees of the State Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, had roles directly related to preventing floods. Michael L. Brown, charged with conspiracy to obstruct a federal audit, was in charge of the state's Hazardous Mitigation Grant Program, which conducts projects to prevent flood losses. Michael C. Appe, also charged with conspiracy, was responsible for the program's finances. Both men pleaded not guilty, and were placed on leave.

    A federal audit found that the program had improperly spent money and had not properly accounted for its federal grants. The audit quoted one unnamed state official as saying that the state did not know how to properly allocate federal dollars. "We treat it all as one big general fund," the official told the auditors. "If we don't spend it, they will take it back."

    That kind of attitude toward federal procedures may not inspire confidence as billions of dollars head their way to Louisiana. As it is, the state's chronic underfinancing of services, its poor educational system and a low-wage job base have led to frequent complaints that Louisiana resembles a third world nation.

    Also unchanged is its eternal ethnic divide, roughly split among blacks, Protestant whites and Roman Catholic Cajuns - and between New Orleans and everywhere else - that has largely focused state politics on cobbling together alliances of self-interest rather than appealing to the greater good. All of those factors will complicate the rebuilding.

    State residents, for the most, have veered between seeing politics as entertainment and train wreck, but these days the humor value may be at low ebb. So when Matthew McCann offered his suggestions for rebuilding New Orleans recently in a letter to The Times-Picayune, he spoke for many others when he concluded: "In my 20 years in New Orleans, all I have seen is chicanery, shenanigans, greed and graft. This has got to change."

    Of course, many people do not want to see the federal government let off the hook either.

    Doug Barden, a bartender at Harrah's casino in New Orleans, said a lack of federal support over 30 years and funding cuts to pay for the Iraq war, not the decisions of local officials, had left city levees vulnerable.

    John Maginnis, a journalist, author and editor of a statewide political newsletter, said that Louisiana's reputation for bad behavior had outstripped its reality, and that whatever flaws one could see in its current leading players - Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, Senators Mary L. Landrieu and David Vitter, and Mayor C. Ray Nagin of New Orleans - none had been the subject of major ethical issues.

    Mr. Maginnis said state leaders were racing to propose ethical safeguards, like Mr. Vitter's call for President Bush to appoint an independent, nonpolitical commission to oversee the spending. If nothing else, such a commission would better position the state in what is already becoming a competition for federal money with Mississippi. (The fear of losing money to other states probably exceeds the fear of improperly spending it.)

    At the same time, other Louisiana politicians are fuming that aid to the state will be unnecessarily slowed.

    "That is not how we're going to get our economy and community back," said Representative Charlie Melancon, a Democrat who represents a large part of Louisiana's hardest-hit area. "It just frustrates the living hell out of me that everybody thinks they know what's right. People in New York are telling us what to do. It's like we're some breed that's different from the rest of the country. I'm tired of it."

    Still, however much the state may have progressed, even its own residents often do not see it. A study this year by the Public Policy Research Lab at Louisiana State University found that 66 percent of respondents said they believed Louisiana was just as corrupt as it ever was and might even be more corrupt today.

    And almost everyone agrees that this moment will test Louisiana's political resolve, not just in terms of integrity but also in areas of social equity and concern for the poor, as painful decisions are made about which areas will be rebuilt and which will not. Particularly problematic will be how and whether to rebuild the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, poor, black, flooded and reflooded but home to 40,000 people, along with equally devastated portions of the largely white St. Bernard Parish just to the east.

    "For Louisiana, this is the moment that will forever tell us who we are," Barry Erwin, president of the Council for a Better Louisiana, a nonpartisan nonprofit group that monitors state government. "Are we at a point where we can rise to the occasion and rebuild our state? Or, will we squander this opportunity to make the most of a horrible situation?

    "We have no choice - we have to get this right."


    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/01/national/nationalspecial/01corrupt.html?pagewanted=all
     
  8. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Nine Charged With Stealing Katrina Funds 4 minutes ago

    SAN FRANCISCO - Nine people were charged with bilking the Red Cross of at least $25,000 donated for Hurricane Katrina victims, the FBI said Tuesday.


    Four suspects were contract workers at a Red Cross national call center in Bakersfield, said U.S. Attorney McGregor W. Scott. The other five allegedly picked up checks they weren't entitled to.

    "This is very much an ongoing case," Scott said. "We are probably going to wind up with a lot more people charged."

    The Red Cross said it set up the national call center in Bakersfield for Hurricane Katrina victims seeking assistance. Operators provide qualifying victims with a personal identification number they then present to receive funds from Western Union.

    "The bad guys would call their buddies and give them pin numbers," Scott said. "Sometimes they'd just call with unused pin numbers. Sometimes they'd give a victim a pin number and turn around and call a buddy with the same pin, and there'd be a race to Western Union."

    Each suspect is charged with wire fraud.

    The Red Cross contacted the FBI after it performed an audit of the call center and discovered "that way too many people in Bakersfield were getting aid," Scott said.

    Several calls to Florida-based Spherion, which operates the call center, were not returned.



    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051004...wkbLisB;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl
     
  9. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Disadvantaged seeking relief struggle to navigate bureaucracy By Katherine Corcoran, Knight Ridder Newspapers
    Sun Oct 2, 5:02 PM ET



    BATON ROUGE, La. - For a month now, New Orleans resident Clarence Williams has watched other Hurricane Katrina victims get checks from the federal government and the Red Cross within days of applying, while he has yet to receive a penny.

    Williams, 47, who lived in the Lower Ninth Ward, applied for relief when he first arrived at the River Center shelter a day after a helicopter plucked him to safety.

    With no car, no cell phone and no familiarity with the Internet, he stood in line for four hours last Sunday to learn that the Federal Emergency Management Agency had mailed his check to his flooded-out home in New Orleans. He was told it would be rerouted to his post office box in Baton Rouge. He waits in line daily for mail.

    A month after Katrina, Williams and thousands of other homeless evacuees are finding the disaster bureaucracy to be as deep and murky as the floodwaters that swallowed their homes. Relief workers say they're doing the best they can with unprecedented demand. FEMA says its online application takes only 20 minutes to fill out and that applicants can check on their cases using a Web site or an 800 number without standing in line.

    "It's simple if you have the means, but how many people in the shelters have a computer?" said Kimberly Butler, a court clerk and former top aide to New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin.

    Butler said she easily received two payments from FEMA and the Red Cross totaling more than $5,000. But she added: "There needs to be different methods of access and more readily available customer representatives to assist the people who can't help themselves. ... There needs to be a greater level of sensitivity to the plight of the people."

    New Orleans City Council members and Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco have urged relief agency representatives to set up more service centers with longer hours and more staff. Blanco's office is pushing to move people from shelters into better transitional housing and to get FEMA and other service agencies to set up where the people are, as rumors run rampant that the farther evacuees go from Louisiana, the better services they get.

    Even Red Cross volunteers have been overheard telling shelter residents to get to another state if they can to file for assistance, or to wake up at 4 a.m. if they want to use the phone.

    According to FEMA and the governor's office, there are still more than 75,000 people in shelters across the United States, more than half of them in Louisiana.

    Katrina victims who have lost their homes are eligible for $2,000 in immediate assistance for food, clothing and shelter, plus $2,300 from FEMA for transitional housing and at least $300 per family member from the Red Cross. Word around the River Center shelter is that people can get $2,000, but most don't know to ask about additional money or long-term help with housing and unemployment, which FEMA also provides based on eligibility.

    On Monday, Sept. 26, FEMA discontinued the $2,000 immediate assistance payments for victims of Hurricane Katrina, but is still offering those payments to Hurricane Rita victims.

    Williams said he didn't know anything about a second FEMA payment. And he said someone else using his name picked up his Red Cross debit card. He applied for another two weeks ago, but has received nothing.

    "If I don't get anything this week, I'm getting back in that line," said Williams, pointing to scores of Katrina victims enduring as much as eight-hour waits in dripping heat outside a FEMA recovery center.

    In the days after the storm, people complained of long lines, busy signals and frustration getting through to aid centers. A month later, the stories are the same.

    Despite more than 1,000 people still living in the River Center shelter, cell phone companies that offered free phone use right after the hurricane are gone, and the shelter no longer is taking applications for Red Cross relief, saying applicants will have to go to a Red Cross center - location unknown. FEMA officials who were helping shelter residents with Internet access and counseling have left for the recovery center.

    Evacuees remaining at the shelter spend hours waiting in line - to use a phone, to see if their checks arrived, to find out why they didn't.

    "We spend half our days in somebody's line," said Joe Wilson, 54, who has waited three weeks for a FEMA check. "I feel like a refugee in my own country, and that's not right."

    The red tape isn't limited to people in shelters.

    Florine Miller, 42, who lost her house in Jefferson Parish and stays with 14 other people in her sister's apartment here, hasn't received any housing assistance despite applying for help from FEMA a month ago.

    A mother of four who worked two jobs but had no savings, she couldn't get through on the Red Cross 800 number and was turned away from one Red Cross center before finally finding a place to apply for aid. She has no car and must rely on her brother-in-law to get around the city and to get her children to school.

    "Without nothing, I can't do nothing," she said. "It's just hard."

    FEMA has processed more than 900,000 applications so far, and $1.5 billion in aid is in the process of being issued, said public affairs officer Rosemarie Hunter.

    "If people are not getting it quickly, these numbers tell you we're doing a lot of work," Hunter said.

    But disaster relief experts agree that agencies need to do more.

    "Four weeks after the event, they should be up and running full speed by now," said George Haddow, a disaster management consultant who was FEMA deputy chief of staff during the Clinton administration. "It's a function of resources. ... If there are five disaster recovery centers and it takes eight hours to get assistance, then go build five more."

    Research on disaster relief confirms that people with higher incomes are more likely to get aid, said sociology professor Tricia Wachtendorf.

    "They're more likely to have access to aid, vehicles, transportation ... and they're more aware of their eligibility for aid," said Wachtendorf, a faculty member of the University of Delaware Disaster Research Center.

    Wachtendorf said relief agencies need to rely less on Web sites and 800 numbers. They should include regular mail, one-stop service centers and consolidated information forms in several languages that people fill out once to qualify for several kinds of aid.


    http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=sto...eau/20051002/ts_krwashbureau/_wea_storms_need
     
  10. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    awesome infomation and great articals .......
    indeed we sleep they cheat at every corner this truely is Organized crime in effect.
     
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