Black People : Where We Were: Where We Are Now?!?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by chuck, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Juneteenth is "Independence Day" for many African-Americans

    Few Americans know that June 19, or Juneteenth, is Independence Day for many folks of African descent.

    Also known as Emancipation Day or Freedom Day, it commemorates the end of slavery, the seminal event in African-American history.

    President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation took effect on Jan. 1, 1863, but the word did not spread instantly.

    According to one account from published slave narratives of how the holiday began, the Emancipation Proclamation was read to slaves in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, more than two years after it officially went into effect.

    As word of the end of slavery spread, Juneteenth was created to commemorate that day.

    Folklore tells why the news of freedom took so long to arrive.

    One story is that slaves were intentionally kept ignorant about their freedom in order to allow crops to continue being harvested.

    Another has one messenger traveling by mule from the date of the Emancipation Proclamation to deliver the news, and it simply took more than two years to arrive from Washington, D.C., to Texas.

    Yet another story has the messenger being murdered before he could deliver the message.

    Juneteenth has been a state holiday in Texas since 1980, and it is either an official holiday or an observed day in at least 17 other states -- Alaska, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma and Wyoming

    Juneteenth is also celebrated in other parts of the world, including China, Ghana, Israel and Japan, to name a few countries, according to Juneteenth.com, an educational Web site.

    Why should anyone celebrate the holiday?

    "With its lighthearted name andtragicomic origins, Juneteenth appeals to many Americans by celebrating the end of slavery without dwelling on its legacy," wrote Julie Moskin in a 2004 article in the New York Times.
    "Juneteenth, its celebrators say, is Martin Luther King's Birthday without the grieving."

    No stats prove how many people celebrate Juneteenth every year, but those who do usually treat it like most holidays: filled with parades, speakers, plenty of food, family, dancing and laughter.
    Happy Juneteenth.
     
  2. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Need to dwell on the legacy and effects of slavery all the way into the present.
     
  3. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Want to contrast where we were with where we are!

    Whatever matters did and does take standing up/speaking out...

    The 'glass half empty' vs 'half full'...

    Our battles go on.: ..

    My oh so 'nubian' brother...
     
  4. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Actually I intended to contrast the past with the present, via the reposting of the article on gangsta rap's negative influence:

    But it's all real...

    And your take on what was or is important etc. to our people isn't mine...
     
  5. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    No...

    But some things we dare not just forget either...

    FYI...
     
  6. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I strongly disagree.

    One of the lessons to draw from our history is not all wrongs have a remedy. In fact, most don't.

    You better learn all of what happened at every angle imaginable to do your darndest to ensure it never happens again.

    Be ever vigilant to the silent progressions of retrogression.
     
  7. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I feel and think I just said that...

    :SuN020:
     
  8. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It is your lack of knowledge, about the origins of our resistance efforts, from the African Motherland, to the states etc., which is too obvious...

    I reject the 'victim' mentality as a given...

    I. e., from generation to generation, folks have felt and thought we can do better, only more recent descendants have started to doubt our abilities, or our peoples...

    FYI...
     
  9. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Pray tell, how is this obvious?
    Also, where is the lack of knowledge? Could you please cite this all for me from this thread?

    Who said anything about victim mentality?

    If you associate studying the legacy and effects of slavery as 'victim mentality', I'll opine it is you suffering from victim mentality along with a most strong case of abject ignorance.

    The US commemorates its pains of 9/11, Civil War, and other military excursions.
    Jews commemorate their pains of enslavement in Babylon and Egypt.

    Tell me, are they practicing 'victim mentality' too in your opinion?

    You talk about the Trail of Tears and the suffering Native Americans received at the hands of Europeans, African-Americans, and the US. Are you practicing victim mentality here?

    Chuck, who said anything about doubting abilities and people?

    Let's try this again: The legacy of slavery needs to be studied, researched, and understood deeply by all Nubians in these United States.

    I'd say that you are the one lacking knowledge. At this point, you aren't even making sense.

    Are you advocating that such history should be ignored? Swept under the rug? Abandoned? Forgotten?
     
  10. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa,




    ...
    Juneteenth
    http://destee.com/index.php?threads/juneteenth.62338/


    Peace In,






     
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