Black People : Where We At?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Heartbeat, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. Heartbeat

    Heartbeat Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I recently spent a few hours watching the science channel, extreme engineering channel, and the discovery channel. In watching these programs it appeared to me that we were terribly absent from the wide shots that showed people working in the areas of STEM (science-technology-engineering-mathmatics) Many of the programs were shot in the late 80's and 90's so I did some additional research and found that although black people are going to college in greater numbers than ever before, black students are less than 1/3 of students majoring in STEM fields of study. WHY IS THIS? Future job growth in areas that will pay the most and provide the best opportunities for entrepreneurship both globally and nationally are in the STEM fields. I hope our young people don't miss this opportunity because the window of opportunity won't be open long before the market is over-saturated if it isn't already. Opinions please. Thank you.
     
  2. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    From first hand experience, STEM is a tough row to hoe.

    Computer science was a bear... and that isn't even the most difficult major for computing...

    Most public schools prepare their students not for college level math and science.

    How many here on this board would go back to school for a STEM major?
    We can start a movement right here right now.
     
  3. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    i got my degree in mathematics....
    these fields are mostly good ole boy mentality dominated....
    even if u r really smart u have to kiss @ss to get opportunities....

    white people and their theories....smh

    it's all good.....the first shall be last and the last shall be first

    one love
    khasm
     
  4. anAfrican

    anAfrican Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    it's the early educational system that disallows that spark of creativity that exists in every child. "for some reason", our natural youthful exuberance at learning is seen as a "disciplinary issue" because we are being somewhat "unruly" ... which is precisely what "natural youthful exuberance" IS! we wind up not excelling at much more than recess, music and sports ...

    IN A HEARTBEAT!! personally, i'd love to delve into the intricacies of mainframe puters (hardware side, of course). i'm curious about what one could do with a five level, fully interconnected hypercube of cray and ibm supercomputers and mainframes!!

    and then there's the whole quantum physics thing: a vast soup of energy wherein there are continuous spontaneous creation/annihilation pairs happening and very very little is "constant". and that which is "constant" wind up being bits and pieces of that which make up the building blocks of atom ... which turn out to be very very empty things making up all things that we think of as matter.

    computer science was fun ... but it seemed as if it weren't really touching on the actual potential of "microsystems sciences engineering".
     
  5. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My man.... my major was Computer Science.

    What area of math interested you the most?

    From basic math to trigonometry was a walk in the park for me.
    Calculus was a bummer.
    Discrete Mathematics was a lot of fun. Applies directly to computer science.

    Proof writing, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Vector Calculus ... bleh ....

    Labs were a bummer too... physics labs, chemistry labs, biology labs, computer labs ... bleh again ....LOL.
     
  6. alyce

    alyce Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Great post, BE! And dear to my heart. My son is currently in his junior year in college, engaged in a dual program between two universities as an Applied Mathematics and Engineering major. His leaning is mechanical engineering. It is gratifying to see the responses on this thread, corroborating what I am seeing as my son goes through his paces. (be great to get him on here to weigh in) Along with his Calculus 3, Physics and a statistics course I can't even name, he's involved in STEM research and has been since sophomore year; slated to continue this summer. You're right, it ain't easy! But as has already been noted, most public schools do NOT prepare students for college level math and science. We were blessed to have been able to foresee some pitfalls that we could circumvent during his formal education (the good ol' boy thing is something we as a people will have....forever), and enrolled him in a charter high school with emphasis on college prep courses - smaller class sizes, one-to-one facilitators, parent-student contracts, etc., and assessment/hands-on opportunities to cultivate students' interests and creativity. That system of education helped him flourish, and find his calling. He is an honor student, and I realize that he'll have to do and be even MORE. That sad reality hasn't changed in all my years on the planet. In a recent conversation, he informed me he's working on his ideas for an invention dealing with utilizing clean/innovative fuels for propulsion (his ultimate interest) as he moves toward graduation in two more years. The youngblood knows he's going to need something extra, to set him apart.

    Go back and do STEM? Well, knowing what I know now - it's an area of study that can take us into the future.... Technology is limitless, imho....
     
  7. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I have a masters in BioChemistry and Electronics. I have almosts in Computer Sci and math. We are out there, but rare. There are only about 3 million chemists in North America. Rocket science is hard


    .
     
  8. Heartbeat

    Heartbeat Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Is it because these fields of study are "hard" that our young people are shying away from them? Are our young people more distracted by other things? These areas of study are no less harder for asians, middle eastern students and white students than they are for us. I think it is a matter of exposure at an early age. Who knows what a young mind might be attracted to if it is exposed to a variety of things. Perhaps buy a kid a microscope instead of a basketball, insist a young child watches the noggin network (Nick Jr.) more than allowing them to play video games. The achievement gap is still as wide as ever and even more so in the sciences and math. Perhaps greater exposure and a greater emphasis at home on education in general and STEM in particular will help turn the tide.
    Kemestry a Rocket Scientist :jumping: I'm glad to know one.
     
  9. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  10. baller

    baller Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    there was a survey done some time ago...that said most kids either like/hate math by the end of the fourth grade. understand this. by the fourth grade, most of our kids have decided against applying themselves in the maths and sciences...where the money is. we're conditioned to believe that advanced level math--which i loved--is too hard for us. when i entered DeVry, the admissions advisor told me that i couldn't handle the "electronics engineering" program. after i cursed him out--he was white--i had he removed as an advisor. don't tell me what i can't handle. we're told that blacks don't do well in the sciences...and we believe it. THEN, WE PASS THAT ON TO OUR KIDS...and they believe it. algebra is the easiest, most exciting math course you can take in high school. yet, most of our kids run from it...unless they're forced to take it.

    i've been involved in a number of not-for-profits that uplifts and empower kids through mentoring, big brothering, etc. whenever it came to tutoring, everyone were on board 'til it came to math. then these grown, college graduates start crying: man, i'll have to let someone else have that one...i hate math. HAVE YOU SEEN THE KINDA STUFF THEY'RE DOING IN MATH THESE DAYS? yet, they expect the kids to be able to fend for themselves. for those people who excel in math, they're encouraged to do so...they're shown that math isn't the terrible monster it's made out to be. once they get beyond that stereotype, they find that math is a building block that requires you to have a good foundation--understanding--of each level you pass through. if you do, the next level is easy.

    we have to change the mentality of our kids. we do that through exposure. we prepare our kids for college, starting in grade school...not high school. as parents, it's our responsibility to ensure our kids are prepared for college...not the high school. if your child needs advanced courses, or pre-college courses, you should meet with the counselors to determine that...so the counselor know you're involved. otherwise, most counselors are too busy to be concerned about what your child needs...and most will advise him/her against things they wouldn't take.

    operating the computer was a frightening thing, until you operated one...was shown how easy it is. look at you now.
     
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