Black Women : When #MeToo excludes me: current movement mutes black women’s voices

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by IFE, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When #MeToo excludes me: current movement mutes black women’s voices


    Time Magazine recently released their Person of the Year issue, showcasing the “silence breakers” — multiple women who spoke out against sexual violence and who spurred a national conversation with the “#metoo movement.”

    At first glance, I noticed that one of the more prominent of the five faces pictured on the cover was Taylor Swift, who won a lawsuit against a radio personality who sued her after he was fired for allegedly groping her
    .

    But omitted from the cover was the founder of the Me Too Movement, Tarana Burke, who first coined the phrase 10 years ago to combat the silence over sexual violence.



     
  2. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black women and girls deserve more respect, visibility in the #MeToo movement


    This has been a monumental year for the reaffirmation of women’s rights in the workplace and the ballot booth. This is long overdue. The battle for the rights of women, and specifically Black women and girls, has gone on for centuries. In America, the spotlight on this fight for women’s rights shines brightly on White women, while Black women, who have often fought more vigorously for equality and justice, are largely consigned to the shadows of the movement.



     
  3. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This movement, at this time, is about white women in Hollywood and Harassment. They won’t let it go and these white women don’t want to talk about sexual assault.

    Rape is a crime. The MeToo movement is not calling out the crime. Sexual harassment is not a crime. It’s a workplace violation.
    Call rape what it is, a crime.

    That’s why I stopped posting about MeToo.
     
  4. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Gabrielle Union on #MeToo: ‘The floodgates have opened for white women’


    “I think the floodgates have opened for white women,” the actress told the New York Times in an interview published this week. “I don’t think it’s a coincidence whose pain has been taken seriously. Whose pain we have showed historically and continued to show. Whose pain is tolerable and whose pain is intolerable. And whose pain needs to be addressed now.”


    Gabrielle Union on #MeToo: 'The floodgates have opened for white ...

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...o-the-floodgates-have-opened-for-white-women/ - - Cached - Similar pages

    Gabrielle Union on #MeToo: ‘The floodgates have opened for white women’

    The actress and rape survivor says black women's voices are still largely going unheard amid a national reckoning.
    washingtonpost.com
     
  5. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Can #MeToo movement do harm? Ansari story raises question


    The #MeToo movement has been embraced by legions of women as a vital step toward countering widespread sexual abuse and misconduct. This week, more so than at any point in the movement's brief history, there's visceral discussion about its potential for causing harm.


    "Though they may have wanted to be in solidarity with other women, the stories of dates gone wrong or women scorned have detracted from women who have been raped or seriously sexually assaulted," she said.


    Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/news/nation-world/national/article195280709.html#storylink=cpy

    Can #MeToo movement do harm? Ansari story raises question

    Online account of woman's date with Aziz Ansari sparks debate about whether #MeToo movement is sometimes being misused.
    star-telegram.com
     
  6. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Me Too Creator Tarana Burke Reminds Us This Is About Black and Brown Survivors

    There’s another “me too” story, about a movement that began a decade before it was a hashtag.



    In 2006, Tarana Burke, founder and director of Just Be Inc. and senior director of Girls for Gender Equity, founded the program me too Movement. Its goal is to empower young women of color who have been sexually abused, assaulted, or exploited, women from marginalized communities. These are the women missing from media discussions of celebrity cases such as Harvey Weinstein, Matt Lauer, and Louis C.K. They are the survivors of sexual harassment and assault that occur in ordinary work spaces, or schools, churches, homes of friends or family members, or the streets of their neighborhoods. But they lack the resources, class status, or even the acceptable skin color to have their stories told.


    I recently had a conversation with Burke about the decade-old me too Movement, the recent social media campaign, and what’s in store for me too in 2018.

    This interview has been lightly edited.





    Me Too Creator Tarana Burke Reminds Us This Is About Black and ...
    http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-p...s-is-about-black-and-brown-survivors-20180104 - 114k - Cached - Similar pages

    Me Too Creator Tarana Burke Reminds Us This Is About Black and Brown Survivors

    There’s another “me too” story, about a movement that began a decade before it was a hashtag.
    yesmagazine.org

    Jan 4, 2018 ... Zenobia Jeffries: How did Just Be's “me too Movement” begin?
     
  7. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The overt racism being shown by these rich and “powerful” white women is appalling.
    Ms. Burke is being very diplomatic. I respect that about her.
    I’m having panic attacks wataching and listening to these white women who got wealth thru sexual harassment.
    And since some of these women, not powerful enough to stop a male from harassing her more than once, are controlling, and leading the direction of the METOO, and rape stories are not on the agenda for the marches.
    I know we’re not suppose to say this, but, some of these women’s stories are not harassment. Some are actual rapes, some sound like bad sex, and some amount to nothing, except what a man asking a woman to do something nasty and she said no. There is no asking in rape.
    I’ve read many of their stories. The ones that confuse me is when the woman says he forced himself on her orally......not rape. If it was rape those legs would have broke a neck. Except after the oral rape he then penetrated her.
    There were several of these white women saying they were raped orally. That’s a new kinda rape story for this Black woman.
    Yet they stole a hashtag and locked it down, for now.
    These powerful wome gotta grow out of MEETOO and on to something new. They have to if the want to if they want to be taken seriously, and keep the power.
    Then the movementn can continue according to Ms. Burke plans.
    I can feel the racism and classism. More regular young white girl shared their rape stories than Black girls.
    Racism is alive a well between Black and white women.

    The men were creeps and Hararers and rapist without a doubt. Why did the women continue to meet with him. (Thinking not asking)
     
  8. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black female stars urge solidarity in the #MeToo movement during NAACP Image Award speech


    "We are America's black women," Kerry Washington began. "Forces of nature," added Tracee Ellis Ross. "We have always been at the frontlines of change," continued Washington. "We show up," said Ellis Ross. "Everyone knows when we show up, we make a change," Jurnee Smollett-Bell said.

    "But we can't do it alone,"Angela Robinson cautioned. "Stand by us, stand for us, stand with us," Laverne Cox urged.

    While never explicit, their message questioned aspects of the movement that still struggle to recognize black women's voices, contributions, and experiences.





    Black actresses ask the #MeToo movement to stand up with them
    http://mashable.com/2018/01/16/naacp-image-awards-black-actresses-me-too-timesup/ - 633k - Cached - Similar pages

    Black actresses ask the world to stand by them during the #MeToo moment

    "When we show up, we make a change."
    mashable.com

    5 days ago ... The actresses' speech raises an important issue that the movement still shrinks from confronting: How black women's experiences of sexual assault, and their work to end it, are too often the first accounts to be doubted, ignored, and excluded from the mainstream conversation. For example, the #MeToo
     
  9. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Me Too founder Tarana Burke: ‘You have to use your privilege to serve other people’

    After Weinstein, Burke’s slogan was adopted overnight by people sharing their experiences of rape and sexual assault. The women’s activist is using her high profile to help the young women she has spent decades fighting for – those who have suffered abuse, and don’t have a voice

    Burke has just returned from LA after attending the Golden Globes with Michelle Williams; as she talks she is trying to eat a quesadilla from a polystyrene container while keeping an eye on her phone. This is one of the busiest times of year for the organisation, she says. “The world doesn’t realise I have a regular job!”

    The idea of attending the Golden Globes was a challenge. “When Michelle called me and said: ‘I would love to take you to the Golden Globes,’ I said: ‘Why? I’m trying very hard not to be the black woman who is trotted out when you all need to validate your work.’” Ouch.



    Me Too founder Tarana Burke: 'You have to use your privilege to ...
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jan/15/me-too-founder-tarana-burke-women-sexual-assault - 919k - Cached - Similar pages
    6 days ago ... After Weinstein, Burke's slogan was adopted overnight by people sharing their experiences of rape and sexual assault. The women's
     
  10. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Real Reason Why We Can’t Just Believe All Women

    Carolyn Bryant. It’s a name everyone should know.

    To know her story is to know why women of color do not have the luxury to just #BelieveWomen without question. To know her name is to know that we live in a world where sexual assault is both real and politically weaponized. To know her name is to know that the boundaries of sexual morality are drawn so that white men are able to claim that all accusations made against them are false, while simultaneously asserting that no accusation made against a person of color go unpunished.

    The Real Reason Why We Can't Just Believe All Women - Medium
    - 139k - Cached - Similar pages
    Nov 26, 2017 ... To know her story is to know why women of color do not have the luxury to just # BelieveWomen without question. To know her name is to know that we live in a world where sexual assault is both real