Brother AACOOLDRE : What was Moses full name?

Discussion in 'AACOOLDRE' started by AACOOLDRE, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Pharaoh’s Daughter gave Moses a Hebrew name?

    The Myth: And the child grew, and she brought him (Moses) unto pharaoh’s daughter, and he became her son. And she called his name Moses: and she said, because I drew him out of the water (Exodus 2:10).

    The reality: The name Moses actually comes from the Egyptian word msy meaning is born, which is usually appended to the name of a god, as in Thutmose or Ramose that is Thoth is born. The Greeks transliterated the msy element as mosis and in English it became Moses. Since the names of other gods, deities were taboo among the Hebrews, the front part of Moses name was dropped, leaving only the msy element.

    I know of another area where Egyptian deities were masked away from the bible is revealed with the Goddess of canals Net. Net is an Egyptian goddess of canals and her image was hidden in bible verse. In the Bible there is a city called Cana where Jesus turned water into wine. Cana means the “Nest” in Hebrew but really is the goddess Net of canals. So the place where the water was made was made into wine was a canal not Cana by Horus not Jesus.
     
  2. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I don't know Moses mother's last name, since before the birth of Prophet Muhammad the lineage was always kept through the woman and not the man. Now being the nice person I am, I'll let someone else tell you what Moses name was before he changed it to Moses, cause it is for sure that that is not the name he was known by before he started HELPING/TEACHING/CIVILIZING WHITE PEOPLE !

    I know...why didn't I just tell you, right? Cause it's nice for me to see that other people are doing research, that's why. Makes me feel all warm inside. Those who have my book already know, so maybe they will post it for you.
     
  3. Music Producer

    Music Producer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Study all names attributed to Akhenaten.
     
  4. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    SENMUT...according to some...

    http://biblelight.net/moses.htm

    However, this most likely was not his "full" name.

    PEACE
     
  5. Music Producer

    Music Producer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    If we go by his Throne name, which is the name he uses to refer to himself in the Great Hymn to the Aten, his name would be Neferkheprure. This name translates as “Sole one of Ra”.
     
  6. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What about Osarseph or Amenophis
     
  7. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  8. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Is this to say that Osarseph is his FULL name?

    Also, is there any acount of this "semi-myth" other than Manetho, who also eqates him "possibly with Joseph"?


    What is the source of Manetho's account?
     
  9. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    According to Gary Greenberg the Egyptians had accounts of Moses movements.

    Biblical Comparisons
    Let us now compare the Osarseph/Peteseph rebellions with the biblical account of the Exodus. Plot-wise, the Egyptian story has the following structure:

    1. A pharaoh fears that a large group of people living in Egypt represent a threat to the throne;
    2. He vacillates between letting them leave the country and enslaving them;
    3. He also vacillates between confronting them militarily and retreating;
    4. He orders them enslaved;
    5. After a period of enslavement, they ask permission to journey to another location of special interest to them;
    6. A god is to punish the Egyptians for the pharaoh’s act of enslavement;
    7. The slaves rise up against the pharaoh and bring great devastation to the land;
    8. A cruel ruler comes to the throne and oppresses the people;
    9. A child is hidden away from the cruel ruler;
    10. The child is raised in the pharaoh’s household;
    11. When the child reaches adulthood, he liberates his people from oppression;
    12. The former slaves are chased out of Egypt by the pharaoh.


    With just one slight plot twist, this story-line is almost identical to that of the biblical Exodus. In the Egyptian account, the child-liberator is the future pharaoh and the cruel tyrant is the slave leader. Therefore, in the Egyptian story the child is hidden away after the slave revolt while in the biblical story the child is hidden away before the slave revolt. In most other respects, however, the biblical and Egyptian stories are virtually identical.

    In both accounts, the pharaoh fears a particular group of Egyptian residents; he enslaves the people whom he fears; the slaves are isolated from the rest of the country; the slaves initially ask to go only to a different location; the pharaoh vacillates between a hard line and retreat; a god punishes Egypt for the act of enslavement; the slave leader causes great devastation to befall Egypt; and the slaves are chased out of Egypt by the pharaoh.

    There are also some interesting factual coincidences in the Egyptian and biblical accounts. The most significant concerns the city of Avaris. In the bible, the Hebrew slaves are assigned to the city of Raamses which scholars generally equate with the Egyptian city of Pi-Ramesses. This Egyptian city received that name during the reign of Ramesses II. But, the original city name was Avaris. So, in both the Egyptian and biblical accounts, the slaves are identified with the same city. Interestingly, neither Josephus nor Manetho seem to be aware of this coincidence.

    In the Manetho account, the slaves number about 80,000. In the Book of Numbers, the Joseph tribes total about 85,000 members. In the Chaeremon account, the combined forces of Osarseph’s army number 630,000 soldiers. Compare that with the claim in Exodus 12:37-38 of the Exodus group consisting of 600,000 males plus a mixed multitude.

    There is also the matter of Heliopolis. That city has a close religious link to pharaoh Akhenaten, who worshipped Re-Herakhty, the chief deity of that city. Biblical Israel also has a close religious link to Heliopolis because Joseph, upon becoming Prime Minister of Egypt, married the daughter of Heliopolis’s chief priest.

    Horus and Set
    The several plot parallels and factual coincidences in the Egyptian and biblical stories suggest a common literary source, but there is still this difficult matter of the role reversal between the pharaoh and the slave leader. To explain this anomaly, we must first examine the chief political myth of Egyptian life.

    According to the Egyptians, the god Osiris and his wife Isis ruled over Egypt in a golden age. Osiris and Isis were brother and sister as well as husband and wife. They also had a brother named Set, and a son named Horus. Set wanted to be king so he assassinated Osiris and seized the throne. But the infant Horus was the legitimate heir and Isis, fearful that Set would kill her son, hid him away for safety. When Horus grew to adulthood, he returned to avenge his father. Defeating Set in battle, he assumed the throne and banished Set to the desert wilderness. In the Egyptian mind, all legitimate kings represent the god Horus in a human aspect.

    This myth is ancient, its basic structure possibly derived from events surrounding the unification of Egypt at the beginning of the First Dynasty by Horus worshippers. In the Second Dynasty, political conflict between Horus and Set worshippers again reappears, with at least one king adopting the name Set instead of Horus, and another adopting the combined name of Horus and Set. And between the Twelfth and Eighteenth Dynasties, when the Asian Hyksos kings dominated Egypt, the Hyksos chose Set as their chief deity while the rebellious native Egyptian royal line continued to identify with Horus.

    The political events defining Horus and Set also overlapped in the area of nature mythology, with Set on the one hand being identified with the evil serpent that devoured the sun at the end of each day, and on the other as the mighty warrior that defended the sun against the evil serpent.

    Despite the murder of Osiris, a Set cult remained active in Egypt, and, the deity retained a relatively positive image down into the Nineteenth Dynasty. As late as the post-Exodus Twentieth Dynasty, we find an Egyptian story known as The Contendings of Horus and Set, in which Horus and Set sue each other for the right to rule Egypt, with Re-Herakhty, king of the gods, favoring Set over Horus. The favorable image of Set in New Kingdom times can be seen from the fact that two Nineteenth Dynasty pharaohs were named Sethos after him and Ramesses I and Ramesses II closely identified with the city of Avaris, which had been dedicated to Set.

    With the expulsion of the Hyksos kings, myth and history combined to form a literary iconography, one that is reflected in both the Osarseph and Exodus stories. Set is the cruel usurper who is subsequently driven into the wilderness; Isis is the mother who hides her child from the cruel ruler; Horus is the child who returns as an adult to defeat the usurper and regain the throne.

    Amenophis and Sethos
    The bible indicates that the pharaoh confronted by Moses had just taken the throne, but it does not identify the pharaoh or his predecessor. In the Osarseph story, the pharaoh who confronted the Moses character was named “Sethos, also called Ramesses.” I suggest that the name “Sethos, also called Ramesses” is a confused description of the very brief coregency between Ramesses I and his son/successor Sethos I.

    This identification is somewhat problematic though, because the father is identified as Amenophis, who is either Akhenaten or Akhenaten’s father. Akhenaten came to the throne 59 years before Sethos I, and several other pharaohs ruled in between. But, if we look at Josephus’s somewhat confused rendition of what is represented as Manetho’s Eighteenth Dynasty chronology, with several pharaoh’s out of chronological sequence, we find the unusual sequence of Ramesses I, Amenophis, and Sethos I, with Sethos I being identified as “Sethos, also called Ramesses.” The Amenophis in that sequence, placed in the middle of the coregency between Ramesses I and Sethos I, is obviously Akhenaten, because he is given a reign of 19 years, the combined length of reign for Akhenaten and his coregent. Strangely, Josephus totally ignores this chronological sequence, alleging that the Amenophis in his story is a fictitious king invented by Manetho.

    The Literary Model for Exodus
    If I am correct in placing Osarseph’s rebellion during the coregency of Ramesses I and Sethos I, then we can place both the Osarseph story and the biblical Exodus story within the literary and political framework of the struggle between Horus and Set.

    Ramesses I was the successor to Horemheb. Like Horemheb, he served originally as a general in the army and had no royal blood. His total reign lasted about two years, part as coregent with Horemheb and part as coregent with Sethos I.

    The bible makes Moses an adopted member of the royal household. If the pharaoh of confrontation is either Ramesses I or Sethos I, Moses would have had an arguable claim to the Egyptian throne. He was a member of the preceding royal house and neither Ramesses I nor Sethos I had any royal blood ties.

    The confrontation between Moses and the Pharaoh, then, was a confrontation over the right of succession to the royal throne, Moses claiming a tie to the royal blood line and “Ramesses, also called Sethos” claiming the legitimate right of succession. Such a conflict would certainly generate an intense propaganda war for the support of the powers that be.

    Each side attempted to identify itself with Horus and the challenger with Set. Consequently, each side is identified with the royal child hidden by his mother from a cruel oppressor, and the challenger is depicted as the illegal usurper.

    At the same time, the literary model is placed against a background of actual political events growing out of the religious/political feuds between Pharaoh Akhenaten and the Theban establishment.

    At first, Akhenaten brought about a hated religious heresy. When he died, a counter-revolution occured. Under Pharaoh Horemheb, an intense political persecution of Akhenaten’s followers took place. When Horemheb died, Osarseph/Moses returned to Egypt, led his oppressed followers in rebellion, and challenged Horemheb’s successor for the right to rule. Civil war loomed in the background. Osarseph/Moses lost the political contest and left Egypt with his followers. Each of the disputants depicted the Exodus of Osarseph as a victory over the rival, claiming to have caused great damage to the enemy forces. For a parallel, one might think of Ramesses II falsely boasting about how he single-handedly drove the Hittites into the Orontes and drowned the enemy.

    Consistent with the Egyptian desire to suppress all public record of Akhenaten’s existence, no monument recorded the Pharaoh’s victory over his political rival. But non-public versions of the story survived in Egyptian records.

    Scribes in both camps framed the historical events within Egyptian literary formats and produced parallel accounts, each portraying their own hero as child-liberator and depicting their rival as the usurping villain. Like backward writing, if we hold both texts up to an Egyptian literary mirror, we can see the true history reflected back at us.
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Gary Greenberg?

    Can you please provide the exact reference (source) authored by Greenberg?
     
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