Black Education / Schools : What 'males of color' need in a school: Column

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
53,361
11,487
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author
In the Spirit of Higher Education,


What 'males of color' need in a school: Column
There is a case for schools for undervalued black male students. But they have to be done right



The Jefferson County, Ky. school system is considering a proposal to open an academy for “males of color” and educate them through the lens of African-American culture.

Is this a good idea?

It depends on the why and the how.

First, the why ...


http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2016/09/05/black-males-school-education-achievement-gap-value-gap-column/89672558/


(Photo: Rogelio V. Solis, AP)


...
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
53,361
11,487
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author

umbrarchist

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jun 13, 2007
438
121
Yes and No!

I remember in 6th grade when the nitwit nuns gave us a NEW history book. There was a picture made into the front cover. It portrayed a long line of people winding back to the horizon. The line represented time with the people farther back wearing more historical clothing. I sat in my little desk staring at that picture. Everybody in the line was White.

But what is the lesson of history?

Battle of the Shangani
The battle proved the effectiveness of the Maxim machine gun, which was to become central to later colonial battles. Cecil Rhodes, writing to Sir Gordon Sprigg, said that "the shooting must have been excellent. . . . It proves the [white] men were not only brave, but cool, and did not lose their heads, though surrounded with the hordes." A week later, on 1 November, 2,000 Matabele riflemen and 4,000 warriors attacked Forbes at Bembezi, about 30 miles (48 km) north-east of Bulawayo, but again they were no match for the crushing firepower of the major's Maxims: about 2,500 more Matabele were killed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Shangani

Who had the technology and who didn't?

I don't hear the Black History enthusiasts saying much about science and technology for the FUTURE.

So is this about JOBS for them?

um

PS - Duh, what do you mean I'm a cynic?
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
53,361
11,487
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author
Yes and No!

I remember in 6th grade when the nitwit nuns gave us a NEW history book. There was a picture made into the front cover. It portrayed a long line of people winding back to the horizon. The line represented time with the people farther back wearing more historical clothing. I sat in my little desk staring at that picture. Everybody in the line was White.

But what is the lesson of history?

Battle of the Shangani

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Shangani

Who had the technology and who didn't?

I don't hear the Black History enthusiasts saying much about science and technology for the FUTURE.

So is this about JOBS for them?

um

PS - Duh, what do you mean I'm a cynic?

Your ambivalence is understood since the curriculum doesn't speak directly to science and technology, but largely promotes a focus on closing the black history gap.

For me, its a go, based on the current inadequacies and historical bridges facing our young black males.


...
 

GrayMatter

Active Member
MEMBER
Aug 17, 2016
41
5
In the Spirit of Higher Education,


What 'males of color' need in a school: Column
There is a case for schools for undervalued black male students. But they have to be done right



The Jefferson County, Ky. school system is considering a proposal to open an academy for “males of color” and educate them through the lens of African-American culture.

Is this a good idea?

It depends on the why and the how.

First, the why ...


http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2016/09/05/black-males-school-education-achievement-gap-value-gap-column/89672558/


(Photo: Rogelio V. Solis, AP)


...
An Afro-centric curriculum would be incredible...

Follow up question, I hope you address:

Do you think there is any excuse for not graduating highschool...highschool? How much effort does it take to graduate highschool? The law all but forces you to attend. You almost have to try not to graduate. I mean, what else is a kid doing?

We are not talking about a Ph.D program. Millions of brothers have graduated from a Euro-centric highschool curriculum. Millions. And those HS diploma holders are doing better than non-HS diploma holders.

Our ancestors put education on a pedestal. Slaves risked their lives for a taste of literacy, of learning. If they didn't need an Afro centric curriulum 200 years ago, do we have to have an Afro-centric education just to graduate our kids?

And even if the education system is not perfect, is that a reason not to invest in it if the benefits are so clear?
Do you believe graduating highschool is NOT a personal choice?
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
53,361
11,487
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author
An Afro-centric curriculum would be incredible...

Follow up question, I hope you address:

Do you think there is any excuse for not graduating highschool...highschool? How much effort does it take to graduate highschool? The law all but forces you to attend. You almost have to try not to graduate. I mean, what else is a kid doing?

We are not talking about a Ph.D program. Millions of brothers have graduated from a Euro-centric highschool curriculum. Millions. And those HS diploma holders are doing better than non-HS diploma holders.

Our ancestors put education on a pedestal. Slaves risked their lives for a taste of literacy, of learning. If they didn't need an Afro centric curriulum 200 years ago, do we have to have an Afro-centric education just to graduate our kids?

And even if the education system is not perfect, is that a reason not to invest in it if the benefits are so clear?
Do you believe graduating highschool is NOT a personal choice?

Indeed, an Afrocentric curriculum would be incredible, as you say above, and then pivot immediately and hard to say this :facepalm: That's called double-speak GrayMatter.


"If they didn't need an Afro centric curriulum 200 years ago, do we have to have an Afro-centric education just to graduate our kids?"
GrayMatter, Today at 4:14 PM


On the
rant you've disguised into question(s), posed against the socially deprived in our low income and impoverished communities, I'll pass on directly addressing what should be obvious to you.


"Do you think there is any excuse for not graduating highschool...highschool?

How much effort does it take to graduate highschool?

The law all but forces you to attend. You almost have to try not to graduate.

I mean, what else is a kid doing?

Do you believe graduating highschool is NOT a personal choice?"
GrayMatter, Today at 4:14 PM








...



 

umbrarchist

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jun 13, 2007
438
121
This just happened today. On a site where people ask any question on any subject someone wrote:

How can a uniform electric field give zig zag motion to the electron in the wire (see comment for description)?

My answer:

A copper atom has 29 electrons. Most of them are going to stay with their nucleus, but they are all whirling around in their various orbitals. With billions of atoms in a wire the electrons being moved by the electric field are going to encounter the relatively stationary electrons and get bounced around somewhat and not just move in straight lines from negative to positive terminal.
This is another answer that I read after I wrote mine:

In any non-superconducting conductor with a potential difference across its end points, the mobile conduction band electrons move towards the more positive potential (though conventional current flows in the opposite direction). These electrons are not just affected by the potential difference across the wire, but also by all of the charged particles in the conductor. These other charged particles are also in motion - some more so than others - so the resultant effect is for conduction band electrons to have some amount of random (or “zig-zag”) motion in addition to their motion from one end of the conductor to another. The average distance traveled by each of these electrons is greater than the physical conductor length.
Jeff Verive

The second answer is typical of what you get from most White guys most of the time. It makes perfect sense if you already understand it, but if you are trying to take off from zero it is more confusing. Why did he even bring up the superconducting crap?

It got better"

Mark Barton, PhD in Physics, The University of Queensland, physicist with National Astronomical Observatory of Japan
Answered Aug 30

As you gather, the job of the battery to create (and defend) a potential difference between the terminals, at least on the public side. (On the inside there’s a lot of messy chemistry that we physicists like to leave to the chemists.)

But the whole point of a potential difference is that along any path between the two points, you see the same net amount of electric field, in the precise sense that the integral of the dot product of vectors representing small displacements along the path and the vector representing the electric field cone out to the potential difference. Equivalently, if you integrate the mechanical work done on a small test charge, you get the same value (the PD times the charge) regardless of the path.

The electric field can have a very complicated pattern in the space between the terminals and you’re under no obligation to attempt make any path follow the field at any point, and yet the integral of the field between the terminals is still the same. Of course if there’s no movable charge in some or all of the space between the terminals then any paths through that area are not very interesting, but there’s still typically an electric field and principle you could move a test charge through it.

It’s when there’s a wire that things get interesting. If you put the wire in the space but don’t actually connect it to the terminals, charge moves around in the wire to cancel the electric field within the wire. That means there has to be a large electric field in the gaps between the terminals and the ends of the wire. And if you do connect the wire to the terminals then it tries to reduce the PD between the terminals and forces the battery to defend it by moving fresh charge onto the terminals. If the wire is very conductive, the battery will probably lose, and the PD will fall, but if the wire is resistive, the wire will lose and fail to reduce the PD between its ends to zero because of Ohm’s law.
This is why the right book is better than the wrong teacher.

um
 
Last edited:
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Clyde C Coger Jr Black People Politics 14

Consciousness Raising Online!

Latest profile posts

Clarity to pursue my mission in 2020
Destee wrote on Omowale Jabali's profile.
Hi Brother O! YAAAAAY! Good to see you! Hoping all is well with you and yours! Happy New Year! :heart:
Destee wrote on King Tubbs's profile.
Hi Brother - so good to see you in the house again! Hoping all is well with you and yours! Happy New Year Beloved! :heart:
Destee wrote on Ms Drea's profile.
Sister ... what did you decide? How will we be moving forward? I've been working, I am excited. I Love You! Happy New Year Beloved! :heart:
One-Hundredd wrote on Destee's profile.
Hope you having a happy holidayz
Top