Pan-Africanism : What is Pan-Africanism?

Queenie

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Feb 9, 2001
7,137
2,062
I'm ignorant about Pan-Africanism and want to learn about it. I've been seeing the term used a lot here in various threads and my lack of understanding prevents me from commenting on it. So I thought I'd come here hoping to find out more about it. But I don't see anywhere that defines it and explains what it means, how the concept got started, basic principles, philosophy, etc.

I could seek and probably will, information on the web but I thought I'd start my search here.

Thanks!:)
 

panafrica

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 24, 2002
10,227
192
The Diaspora
Hey NN, now you know if you wanted an explanation of PanAfricanism, all you had to do was ask me. Here it goes:

In all honesty there is not a set definition of Pan Africanism, you can't find a definition in Webster's Dictionary. Pan Africanism is an idea. Pan Africanism grew out of 19th century efforts to end slavery and the slave trade. At this time blacks worldwide were being oppressed. Slavery existed in America, South America, and the Carribean. Also the colonization of Africa (born out of the Berlin Conference of 1884 & 85) had begun. As a result of these events black people world wide began to realize that they faced common problems (slavery, colonization, and racism), and that it would be to their benefit to work together in an effort to solve these problems. Out of this realization came the Pan African Conferences of 1900 (London), 1919 (Paris), 1921 (London, Brussels, Paris), 1923 (London), 1927 (New York), and the last official one was in 1949. Some of the most influential blacks of the time participated in these meetings: Slyvester Williams, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Kwame Nkrumah, etc. The belief that people of African descent throughout the Diaspora (meaning spread throughout the world) share a common history, culture, and experience and should stick together. This belief is the principle idea behind Panafricanism. Bringing black people throughout the world together because of our common culture. Panafricanism can be expressed through history, literature, music, art, film, clothing, and food. I hope this helps
 

Queenie

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Feb 9, 2001
7,137
2,062
Hey PA...*lol*...well, like I said, it really wasn't until I saw so many references being made to it in some posted messages throughout the different forums here that I realized if I wanted to respond intelligently, I'd better learn more about it.

Yes your explanation makes a lot of sense, so much so that now I'm really curious as to what has happened since the 1949 conference. With such an admirable ideology why hasn't this concept, not only been sustained, but spread throughout the African American community and embraced more widely? Is there more to it than you had time to share that has caused people to question Pan-Africanism? You've listed some of the pros, now, knowing how objective you can be PA, what are some of the cons?
 

panafrica

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 24, 2002
10,227
192
The Diaspora
I don't have much time so I'll be short with this response.

The continued progress of the PanAfrican Conferences were slowed by the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement in America (1950), and the renewed movement for Indepence in Africa (most of the countries in Africa would achieve their independence in the late 1950s & 60s). In other words the major participants of the PanAfrican conferences became consumed with changing the social structure in their own countries and ceased to work together worldwide.

So to answer your question NN, I guess a shortcoming would be that with PanAfricanism it can be difficult to decide whether to concentrate more heavily on solving the problems around you or the problems effecting blacks worldwide. Also a new Pan African group was formed in the 1990s: the New Pan-African Movement (PANAF). They hold periodic meetings by African heads of state and development officials to attempt to fix African problems. They officially meet in 1991 (Ivory Coast), and 1993 (Gabon). They are headed by the Rev. Leon Sullivan, and endorse free trade, domocratization, and an international solution to the politicial problems of blacks. However they are not that high profile (I haven't heard anything from them in quite awhile).
 

$$RICH$$

Lyon King Admin.
STAFF
Mar 21, 2001
69,925
3,939
Da~WINDY*CITY //CHICAGO
Occupation
BUSINESS owner
see i didn't know all dis here so i learn something today
Thanks
 
Destee Chat

Latest profile posts

Destee wrote on Joyce's profile.
Thanks for the Blessing! Love You! :kiss:
Making sure I do more than I did yesterday. Progress is the Concept.
Ms Drea wrote on yahsistah's profile.
Welcome Back Sister!!
Love and Blessings!!
Hey Sister Destee just logged in to say Love you and miss you much! Hope you are well.
Destee wrote on candeesweet's profile.
Hi Sweetie Pie Honey Bunch!!!! :love: ... it's good to see you! I hope you and yours are all well and staying safe. I Love You! :kiss:
Top