Pan Africanism : What is Black?

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by AfroBoricuaRoni, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. AfroBoricuaRoni

    AfroBoricuaRoni Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Many are quick to say who/what isn't Black yet can not say what Black is; which brings me to my question...is there a concrete definition of Black?
     
  2. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Science will sometimes fail, in the presence of truth

    Peace AfroBoricuaRoni,

    In this Western world, we seem to be obligated to explain all things and put corners on every square. We also seem, to want to explain even the unexplainable. Perception is the master of the material world and the shadow of things unseen.

    I once heard that Black people were the invisible or unperceivable people in the Western world.

    Let me say this, I don't know if I can define the darkness of space, but I know it's there and it has a profound affect over me, when I gaze into it. Each Black man and woman must define them self, and there is an imperceptible and incalculable sense of knowing that overwhelms the listener, who is Black. I don't think Europeans have words or terms for this realm, regardless of the language or science. There are no measurements for the intrinsic essence of Black people or the beginning of time or the darkest places in space.

    We know, who we are, regardless of where we come from.

    And if you say you are Black, then there is no power in heaven or earth that can deny it, not even another Black person.

    If you are truthful I will know, if you really know and If I am truthful, you will know, if I really know.


    Ase,

    Brother Sun Ship


    May the ancestors always help us know who we are. Ase.
     
  3. AfroBoricuaRoni

    AfroBoricuaRoni Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well put!

    So I see Sun Ship...

    I've also felt that way but had a hard time putting those feelings together as you have.

    I think that is what may hurt or negatively affect some people the most, when they say that they are Black and then there is another Black person telling them that they aren't; but as soon as you deny your Blackness they're the first ones in your face telling you that you've sold out.

    It's confusing.

    But then that also brings me to another point, that we shouldn't attempt to find ourselves by searching through other people; because really...people can tell you anything. And that, IN MY OPINION (so don't bite my head off people), is one of the reasons some young ones turn to the wrong facets for validation.
     
  4. Wezaa2004

    Wezaa2004 New Member MEMBER

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    (I once heard that Black people were the invisible or unperceivable people in the Western world)

    I also hear that Native Americans are considered this. I read your thread in another message, but as a person of many different backgrounds, I didn't think posting multiracial links was at all funny. I have one parent who is Black and Cherokee and another who is White. I take lots of pride in who I am and don't think that on any board I should be denied my own presence. I agree with AfroBoriRioni that Blacks often times act like they are the only ones who can judge Blackness. We all have our own self perceptions and our own way to describe what we are. It doesn't necessarily mean we do not take pride in our ancestry or are running away from the truth. It means we take EVERYTHING into account. I grew up having issues of racial barriers and I do believe that we Americans can be cruel and arrogant about a lot of these things. Sometimes to the point that we deny other people the ability to be who ever it is they are. Personally I got over the taunts of ignorant people and live with ALL MY FACETS and that means ALL OF THEM. I am not into the one-drop thing. I am into ME, a beautiful HUMAN BEING. There is nothing wrong with claiming multiraciality if it makes one feel complete. The sellout mentality is for some not all of us. Wza...
     
  5. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Greetings AfroBoricuaRoni and welcome "downstairs" from the poetry section. What you wrote about people not searching to find themselves through other people is true in the sense that we should all find our identity through our own means and not because someone thinks of us a certain way. But I would like to add that, maybe the best way that we can find ourselves is by searching through other people as far as our lineage goes. Does that make sense?

    I'm smiling at your plea to people who read you not to bite your head off. :) We do have some passionate members who aren't afraid to share their opinions on topics but I don't believe they bite. I'm not sure where you're coming from but if anyone does attempt to do that and moderators don't address it, please bring it to our attention and we'll make sure the problem is corrected.

    It's nice to have you join us to give us the benefit of a younger perspective. Maybe you can give older members pointers on how to be better "role models".

    Peace :spinstar:
     
  6. AfroBoricuaRoni

    AfroBoricuaRoni Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Don't get me wrong people...

    While I agree with some of what you said Wezaa2004, I hope I didn't imply that Blacks in general felt they're the only ones who feel that they can judge Blackness, but it does kinda hurt when one of your own tells you you aren't a part of the whole.

    Just remember that no one has the power to tell you who/what you are. They are not in a position to define anyone but themselves. There's nothing wrong with having an opinion but one must know what they are talking about first before they can give a statement with that much power.
     
  7. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Wezaa

    This is your second post Wezaa and it has a bitter edge to it. Are you coming here to let lus know how upset you are with members who may have made comments that you find offensive and then to argue with them? Has anyone here "attacked" you personally by trying to deny you your right to claim whoever you believe yourself to be? Has any member made a disparaging remark ABOUT you or your multiracial background or told you that you aren't who you claim to be? Are you coming to our community to criticize Black people for believing the way they do, regardless of whether you think it's right or not? What is your point by letting us know your multiracial background? Do you expect someone to say something negative about that? Thanks for letting us know that you're into YOU and not the "one-drop" thing. Everyone here knows that is your right. Has anyone here ever accused you of being a sellout?

    If anyone has attacked you personally Wezaa here at these forums or said hateful things to you, then please let us know. I've read both of your posts and don't see how that can be but maybe you know something I don't, so please share.

    I hope that you can contribute some meaningful discussion here so that we can learn something from you. This certainly makes my role here much easier to deal with.

    Please let me know if I can be of assistance to you.

    Peace :thanks:
     
  8. AfroBoricuaRoni

    AfroBoricuaRoni Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I feel ya...

    Hey NNQueen,

    I understand what you are saying about searching our lineage to find ourselves. I've heard that saying that you have to know where you've come from in order to know where you are going. I agree with that 100%. It came to my attention when I wrote what you quoted.

    I also undestand that posters don't exactly bite peoples heads off. I just used it as a figure of speech because as much as I enjoy forums of all sorts, I have seen too many people get ignorant, cocky, irrational, and all kinds of things; basically taking the discussion waaaaaaaaaaay off it's origin.

    Regretfully, I've fed into posters messeges that purposely attacked others. I'm just getting to the point in my life where I realize that a direct retalliation isn't the only way to handle a situation; and also that I don't have to fight all the battles that come my way. Sometimes you have to let God fight for you. It's not in our power to make someone understand, BUT we can try as long as we do so the right way.

    Thanks for appreciating this younger perspective!
     
  9. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You are more, than what others may think or say

    Peace AfroBoricuaRoni,

    Those who tell you, you are not, what you know you are, are usually lacking in the knowledge of self, themselves.

    Your ancestors have left you a legacy, but you must search it out and stand on it and let no one shake your foundation.

    We have had something stolen from us that no one owned and that no one can purchase, this is more than skin color, race and colonial languages. All came from Blackness and one day all will return. But Blackness is the definition of the indefinable; we are a people who are beyond the racial paradigm. African spirituality direct us to the essence of our being; it has constantly transformed itself on every plantation and every language.

    You are here for a reason.

    Let those who tell you, who you are not, become your students and let the ancestors become your teachers. Maybe people are challenging you, to strengthen you. We all must go through the fire, for clarity.

    May you be blessed on your journey young woman.

    Peace,

    Brother Sun Ship


    PS__Wezaa2004, I will respond to your post back in the thread that you referred to, this is only fair to AfroBoricuaRoni and others who will respond to this thread.

    http://www.destee.com/forums/showpost.php?p=197627&postcount=240
     
  10. Olorun1

    Olorun1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Good question

    * Greetings & Peace to all

    - From my own perspective and reality: I like to use the terminolgy first used by the Black intellectuals of the 1930's who coined the term Negritude. Aime Cesaire [1913-2002], Pan-African, Poet, Philosopher & Activist -- together with Leopold Senghor [1906-2001 elected president of Senegal in the 1960's brought about a much needed understanding and concept of regaining what was lost by African Peoples worldwide -- due in large to the coming of the Europeans into Africa and the slave trade.

    http://www.jahsonic.com/Negritude.html
    http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/senghor.htm

    *Again, your question as simple as it may seem, begs for a concrete answer which I think cannot be answered in a statement or paragraph(s). Then again, if really and answer to the obvious is sought -- the answer is just as simple as the question. The problem is that most people outside of the Pan-African reality do not accept any factual or philosophical explanation for Blackness.

    What is Black? You asked. Plainly Black, is a very superficial term, which doesn't go beyond color [what's seen at the surface -- skin]. Negritude / Blackness takes on a necessity dictated by the detachment of a Peoples' identity. An identity erased violently to the tune of millions of human beings mutilated, sold, raped, slaughtered etc.. etc......... :censored: -- So, in reclaiming pride, culture, spirituality, self-esteem, and most importantly an African-centered identity is in my view the complete definition to the original question, which by the way is what makes me whole.

    Each individual has to make the adjustment when coming in contact with a newfound consciousness of self. The individual will no longer allow others to define him / her, but rather dictate & define to the rest of the world with confidence who she / he is. And African conciousness is identity for the 'Lost and scattered children of Mama Africa'.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Personally I got over the taunts of ignorant people and live with ALL MY FACETS and that means ALL OF THEM. I am not into the one-drop thing. I am into ME, a beautiful HUMAN BEING. There is nothing wrong with claiming multiraciality if it makes one feel complete. The sellout mentality is for some not all of us. Wza...

    * In an Utopia, we're all beautiful human beings -- But what's the reality of our world? We live in a world which does not judge us for MLK's "content of our character", but by prejudices passed down from generation to generation.

    PEACE
     
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