Black People : What is anti Democracy

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by AACOOLDRE, Dec 23, 2011.

  1. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What is anti-Democratic?
    By Andre Austin

    Democracy is people vote for representation in congress. Do they get it. The people don’t get representation but investigation for complaining about no representation.

    THE PROBLEM:

    This is anti-Democratic.

    1. Nullification of elected leaders by white government making emergency manger laws

    2. Allowing Banks and Wallstreet turn private citizens and states into municipal bonds of perpetual usury slaves. Debt=the old slavery system.

    3. Lobbyist directing politicians to act in certain ways instead of The People telling the Politicians and Judges how to run our lives.

    4. Voter ID laws

    5. Supreme Court rulings making corporations =People

    6. Bias media reporting that deflects attention from real big problems. Plus fueling racial divide by class and race.

    7. Peoples soul have been reduced to capital gain/loss.

    8. Politicians wanting to sabotage the economy to hurt their competitive political party

    THE RESULT:

    I should have included number 7 into this category. People live under the illusion that they are citizens when in reality you are a subject, your economic life is reduced and made part of the city, state and federal debt. Banks and corporation want to make money off of the government so they have the government borrow but make the people pay. This has been going on since 1913 when they created the IRS, FBI and new income tax laws to reduce people to subjects and debt slaves.

    THE SOLUTION:

    Pay 15 trillion debt off with 3 trillion every year for five years. All future wars paid by War tax and draft. All military bases must be paid for by countries we are protecting.
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    All due respect that is the basis of imperialism! a form of grandiose extortion since all international enemies or nuisances were funded by the international bankers
    What really was the Third Reich?
    What is realy Al Qeda?
    Who realy are the Taliban?

    Ordo Ab Ciao, create some chaos then send in the marines to establish order

    The original function of the Marines was debt collectors

    1 End outsourcing end return tariffs and there is no debt
    2 End corporate welfare
    3 End tax shelters and make corporations pay their taxes
    4 Return Glass Steagal
    5 Abolish the Federal Reeserve
    and the treasury instead prints money like any sane nation
    6 Abolish HMOs and create universal health care
    7 End subsidies to oil, coal and nuclear
    8 End hydrofraking
    9 Stop BSing about solar and wind and just do it
    10 Release the secret zero point energy technology to the public so energy can no longer be fuel based and then pimped

    Democracy is slowly destroyed by slowly and methodically destroying the focus and and then lowering the intellectual level of the masses, and replacing intellectual analysis of politics and economics with pure emotionalism

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Adolph Hitler, from Mein Kampf

    All propaganda must be popular and its intellectual level must be adjusted to the most limited intelligence among those it is addressed to. Consequently, the greater the mass it is intended to reach, the lower its purely intellectual level will have to be. But if, as in propaganda for sticking out a war, the aim is to influence a whole people, we must avoid excessive intellectual demands on our public, and too much caution cannot be extended in this direction.
    The more modest its intellectual ballast, the more exclusively it takes into consideration the emotions of the masses, the more effective it will be. And this is the best proof of the soundness or unsoundness of a propaganda campaign, and not success pleasing a few scholars or young aesthetes.
    The art of propaganda lies in understanding the emotional ideas of the great masses and finding, through a psychologically correct form, the way to the attention and thence to the heart of the broad masses. The fact that our bright boys do not understand this merely shows how mentally lazy and conceited they are.
    Once understood how necessary it is for propaganda in be adjusted to the broad mass, the following rule results:
    It is a mistake to make propaganda many-sided, like scientific instruction, for instance.
    The receptivity of the great masses is very limited, their intelligence is small, but their power of forgetting is enormous. In consequence of these facts, all effective propaganda must be limited to a very few points and must harp on these in slogans until the last member of the public understands what you want him to understand by your slogan. As soon as you sacrifice this slogan and try to be many-sided, the effect will piddle away, for the crowd can neither digest nor retain the material offered. In this way the result is weakened and in the end entirely cancelled out.
    http://fcit.usf.edu/holocaust/people/DocPropa.htm

    Look at the different movements of young Blacks, Whites and Chicanos in the 60s;
    There were elements of enrichment, in the schools,
    on telelvision, in music and in movies
    all to be remembered for generations

    Look at the different movements or lack of movements of young Blacks, Whites and Chicanos today;
    Elements of enrichment were removed from the schools and the content of television , movies and music has been debased to the lowest common denominator all to be forgotten within the next ten years


    UNtil the focus and intellectual level is restored democracy cannot take effect

    The term democracy is based on an informed citizenry is no catch phrase but a fact

    Once restored the solution is simple

    Form a Black political agenda
    Create a 10 billion dollar lobbying concern as Malcolm mentioned almost 50 years ago

    All working class , poor and working poor Americans, vote out all politicians, one clean sweep to let them know who is in charge, vote out the good with the bad

    Boycott the benefactors of the politicians, they oppose

    Create a third non corporate controlled party after 2 years of the above
     
  3. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What of republicanism?

    Nothing new. Look at European history. Start with Greece and Rome with particular emphasis on Rome.

    People have never been free of any bonds of servitude in European governance. Again, begin with Greece and Rome.

    Most people do not study government, politics, or history. If they don't know how many branches of government there are, how would they be able to direct politicians and judges?

    Judges aren't direct per se so much as if you present a case with the necessary elements, then they can rule in your favor.

    According to Wikipedia, US courts have extended some constitutional protections to corporations (cite). As pertaining to corporate personhood, here is the Supreme Court case that has had interesting influence. Upon request, I could dig up the actual court case if there is interest.

    Of the 150 court cases involving the 14th Amendment from its foundation to Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) (separate but equal), only 15 involved Nubians. The remaining 135 concerned corporations. (source)

    The 14th Amendment has become the corporate amendment.

    Allow this to serve, in part, to underscore my position of the dangers of collectives against individuals. Collectives have a tendency towards tyranny.

    Let's look to history again. How about Bacon's Rebellion?

    Tis' better to have subjects fighting against each other than fighting against you (if of the ruling class).

    And this is the crux of history. Take your pick of what you would like to call it: employment; serfdom; corvee; slavery; peonage; conscription; and many, many more terms.

    This can be summed under the term 'rent-seeking behavior'.
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Published on Friday, December 23, 2011 by NACLA

    The US Double Standard on Elections in Latin America and the Caribbean

    by Alexander Main and Daniel McCurdy
    The U.S. government has a puzzling approach to elections in the hemisphere. Back in November 2009, the State Department considered that elections held under Honduras’s brutal coup regime were “free and fair,” despite widespread press censorship and the imposition of martial law during much of the electoral campaign. Then, in November 2010, the U.S. government endorsed the electoral process in Haiti despite the fact that the country’s most popular political party had been arbitrarily excluded and despite a vast number of irregularities identified by both observers and the electoral authorities. Afterwards, the U.S. government, together with Organization of American States (OAS) “experts,” arbitrarily changed the elections’ first round results and then applied extreme pressure on the Haitian government to force it to accept the change.
    Elections were held in Nicaragua in November. Turnout was high and, though some observer groups considered the elections to not be sufficiently transparent, there were no credible claims of fraud. Despite a very clear margin of victory for presidential incumbent Daniel Ortega—who won over 60% of the votes—the U.S. government expressed strong misgivings over the electoral process. At a meeting of the OAS Permanent Council on November 16, a senior U.S. official announced that the United States was “seriously concerned about the irregularities” in Nicaragua’s elections. The official called on the OAS electoral observation team to “evaluate all of the possible responses, including diplomatic initiatives . . . to determine the steps for strengthening democracy in Nicaragua.”
    The U.S. government’s approach to elections in the hemisphere is, on the surface, baffling. It begins to make sense, however, if one considers the United States’s long-standing political agenda in the region.
    In Nicaragua, the U.S. government has, since the late 1970s, consistently sought to undermine the left-wing Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN). In Honduras and Haiti—and throughout the rest of the region—the State Department has favored right-wing political movements aligned with elite business and political sectors in the United States. As was the case with previous governments, the Obama administration claims to act solely in the defense of democracy and human rights. In fact, as the contrasting U.S. responses to these three elections demonstrate, the administration is primarily concerned with promoting a narrow political agenda that offers little benefit to Latin Americans or U.S citizens. In many cases, the United States uses its significant leverage at the OAS to obtain support for its positions on elections.
    ***
    The tragic history of U.S covert and overt interventions in Nicaragua in the 1980s is well known. William Robinson and other scholars have documented the well-funded methods that the United States applied in Nicaragua to assure the FSLN’s political defeat in the 1990 elections after U.S.-backed Contra forces failed to achieve its demise by violent means. There is as yet little scholarly research focused on U.S. political intervention in Nicaragua in recent years. However there are a number of troubling incidents that have been reported in the media. For instance, when it became clear in 2006 that the FSLN’s Daniel Ortega could win the presidential elections, the U.S. Embassy in Nicaragua tried to prevent his victory by making threats—for example, suggesting that U.S. aid could be cut—and actively seeking to unite right-wing opposition groups. On November 24, 2008, the United States cut off $62 million of Millenium Challenge Corporation (MCC) aid to Nicaragua following unsubstantiated claims of fraud in the municipal elections of November. In contrast, a little less than a year later, a military coup toppled the left-leaning democratically-elected government of Manuel Zelaya in Honduras, yet millions in MCC funds continued to flow to the country.
    Nicaragua’s November general elections unfolded with few irregularities, though some international observers reported having been initially prevented from accessing certain polling locations and both the European Union (EU) and OAS observation teams criticized the election’s “lack of transparency.” This criticism appears to have been based primarily on one opposition party’s claim that the country’s electoral authorities refused to provide their electoral monitors with proper credentials. It should be noted, however, that the party in question requested thousands of credentials only two days before the elections, long after the deadline for such a request had passed.
    Whether or not the EU and OAS observation missions were entirely justified in their criticism, it is important to note that neither alleged that fraud took place in the elections. The OAS mission chief, Dante Caputo, stated that OAS observers had seen no “significant irregularities,” and a quick count carried out by the OAS team produced results very similar to those of the Nicaraguan electoral council. OAS secretary general Miguel Insulza initially lauded the electoral process, saying “in Nicaragua yesterday, democracy and peace took a step forward.” However, a couple days later Insulza had the quote removed from the OAS website. Prior to the elections, independent polls by Cid-Gallup and M&R Consultants had repeatedly predicted a decisive win for Ortega.
    Though there is little basis for contesting the results of Nicaragua’s elections, the U.S. has sought to use the complaints around transparency issues to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the entire process. It’s unlikely that any other government in the hemisphere besides Canada’s right-wing administration will back the U.S. position. But it is highly probable that the United States will adopt an increasingly hostile policy toward Nicaragua based on the unfounded assessment that the elections were not free and fair.
    ***
    After passing a similar judgment on Haiti’s 2000 parliamentary elections, the United States mounted a campaign to destabilize the country’s left-leaning government that culminated in a coup and the forced exile of the democratically-elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. An OAS electoral observer mission initially approved on the elections as valid, calling them a “great success,” but later joined the United States in characterizing them as illegitimate.
    Whereas there was little basis for not recognizing Haiti’s 2000 elections, the November 2010 general elections were plagued with defects that were widely denounced long before the elections occurred. As international organizations and members of Congress from both parties pointed out, Haiti’s Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) barred the nation’s most popular party, the left-leaning Fanmi Lavalas, from participating based on unsustainable technicalities. Also, no effective measures were taken to ensure that the hundreds of thousands of Haitians living in camps as a result of the earthquake on January 12, 2010, would be able to access the polls. The United States failed to denounce these grave flaws. In fact, the Obama administration provided much of the funding for the elections and pushed for them to take place sooner rather than later despite the major logistical challenges brought on by the earthquake.

    http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/12/23-8?print
     
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