Black Entertainment : WHAT IF THE SOUTH HAD WON THE WAR?

Discussion in 'Black Entertainment' started by Metaverse, Dec 20, 2007.

  1. Metaverse

    Metaverse Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    CSA: The Confederate States of America

    A MUST SEE MOVIE:
    Can be viewed here in full For a limited period:
    http://www.blaccmecca.com/channels/movies/movies.html


    The Confederate States of America, through the eyes of a faux documentary, takes a look at an America where the South won the Civil War. Supposedly produced by a British broadcasting company, the feature film is presented as a production being shown, controversially, for the first time on television in the States.

    http://www.csathemovie.com/

    [​IMG]
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    What if the South had won?
    By Jon Niccum

    February 21, 2003

    "This film is bigger than the genre of faux documentary," he says. "It's how we found our way into this story. If I had to create a whole new universe of the Confederacy today, it would have been very difficult. But picking and choosing what I show through a documentary gives me that ability."

    Lawrence-based director Kevin Willmott, right, and cinematographer Matt Jacobson, both assistant professors in theatre and film at KU, have completed "C.S.A. -- The Confederate States of America." The movie is a mock documentary of what might have happened to America if the South had won the Civil War.

    Persuading the community
    Willmott, a Kansas University assistant professor in theatre and film, wrote the first draft of "C.S.A." in 1997 while still working on his previous picture "Ninth Street," a drama that starred Isaac Hayes and Martin Sheen. Armed with that early version of the script, he received a $10,000 grant from the National Black Program Consortium.

    "That made it real for me," he says of the PBS-affiliated grant. "I was like, 'I've got to do it now; they gave me some money.'"

    "Believe it or not, they probably don't want to think that the Confederacy had slaves," he replies. "There are a lot of people right now who want to hold onto their Confederate heritage, but that heritage is somehow divorced from slavery. The movie puts slavery as the centerpiece. Finally we're going to discuss the Civil War as if slavery mattered. So those people are going to probably feel a little uncomfortable."

    Adds Jacobson, "Nobody talks about why society is the way it got today. When people walk out of this movie -- hopefully after the film is over, not halfway through -- I hope that they're going to start talking about an issue that we've raised."

    "C.S.A." deals with these issues through its shrewd manipulation of the truth. In real-life history, Confederate president Jefferson Davis purportedly tried to avoid capture by fleeing south dressed as a woman. In Willmott's vision, Union leader Abraham Lincoln is captured en route to Canada disguised in blackface.

    Other memorable moments include a look at a Home Shopping Network-type program that specializes in marketing slaves. It's hosted by two chipper white women trying to peddle a black couple and their cute "litter of pickaninnies." And there's a painfully funny commercial for The Shackle -- a device similar to the vehicular LoJack but used for tracking slaves. ("Made of a lightweight aluminum alloy so it won't weigh your Tom down. Perfect for children!")

    "In many ways I realized the South DID win the Civil War," Willmott explains.

    "They lost on the battlefield, but they won the fight for ideology. The best example is Lawrence -- a town founded on abolition -- but then they start segregating. It's not the MISSISSIPPI Board of Education case, it's the TOPEKA Board of Education case. So the free state becomes a semi-slave state. How the heck did that happen?"


    COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE: http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2003/feb/21/what_if_the/
     
  3. Enki

    Enki The Evolved Amphibian STAFF

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    I saw a book in the book store about a month ago that was about "what if" scenarios and this was one of them. I knew I should have gotten it.

    The North was becoming more and more industrialized which put them at odds with the South since it was based on agriculture. Now if the South had won the war, IMO it have weakened the nation. If the South was allowed to break away from the North, then the South would have decimated the North, weakening it. The South's departure from the Union would have taken away raw materials, and food needed to keep the manufacturing businesses in the North going strong. This loss would have weakened the economy and the ability to provide jobs for workers.


    Peace!
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Well said.

    Yes, even Europe was affected by the exports of the South, placing Britain and France, especially, in some "sticky wickets" because they did not want to choose sides....didn't want to alienate either side, not make any "enemies."

    Britain, particularly, stayed "neutral" on an "official, diplomatic" level while still aiding the war however it could.
     
  5. Enki

    Enki The Evolved Amphibian STAFF

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    Tru dat sista,I wonder what would they have done in terms of trade if the South had won since they were opposed to slavery? Would they have boycotted the South?
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Although England had already abolished slavery 30 years before the U.S., that did not stop them from trading with the U.S.

    Slavery in the U.S. did not place any "consciences" over economics.

    "COTTON WAS KING."
     
  7. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    If it was on the other hand who knows what would have happen !
     
  8. Enki

    Enki The Evolved Amphibian STAFF

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    There was a time when cotton was king and it's impact on the early American economy could not be overstated.Many people make think the Civil War about the abolition of slavery, it wasn't it was as you stated, Economics. Back then,cotton was indeed an economic powerhouse, not just in the South, but throughout the world.


    http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/DocsCottonIsKing.htm

    Peace!
     
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