Black People : What Happened to the Civil Rights Movement?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Africana, Apr 16, 2006.

  1. Africana

    Africana Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    More importantly what happened to the African-American community? Things were going strong in the 70's with the Black Panthers, then all of a sudden......nothing. What is that? Where did it go? Here's my take:

    The ultimate breaking of the AA community, which used to be something to be proud of and still is in some cases, was due to the peddling of drugs, guns, and liquor stores. Most of the people in my generation are really screwed up due to horrible parentage. Most of this parentage were the youth of the late 60's, and 70's. If everyone's on crack how can they be good parents? Although, a lot of people who do have addictions do, strive to do their best and make it. Look at Tupac, his mother was a strong Black Panther and was ultimately brought down by drugs but still did her best to take care of her children. Now she is free of drugs and is a strong black woman again. Many went down her road or were thrown in jail. Then you have those liquor stores that has set up permanent shop in nearly every black community. Once again you can't be a good parent if you are an alcoholic. Then you also lose the closeness of the community. If your neighbors think you are unfit to be around their children they won't allow them to be around you. This leads to distrust and the overall community is broken. One thing that was always a marvel of blacks is we always stuck together. As the Africans say, "It takes a village to raise a child". Nowadays the village doesn't raise the child, the child's raises itself. This also gets that attitude where they don't have to listen to anybody. If you participate in adult activities, have always taken care of yourself and those around you, and are not even old enough for a license most of the time you will reject authority. Mainly, because you feel as if you are already an adult it is so unfamiliar to you. And the Civil Rights IMO is at a pause, not an end. I don't know what it was or is but the 80's, 90's, and early 00's has been a sleeping period for blacks. It is time for all of use to wake up and we are....slowly.
    Well this is the only thing of my opinion I could think of right now, but I want to know what you all think. Where did the CVM go and what ruined the black community?
     
  2. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My .02......

    It would be delightful if I were able to speak on what progressive moves, we, Blacks made during the 60's & 70's freedom/unity movements. As I recollect(4 y/o), I experienced peace, and being fortunate enough to have been born in wedlock, and raised by BOTH parents during my first 5. There was definately a move of women pushing for independance. This I can't deny. Although my father made a surplus of money, my mother felt liberated to the point she wanted to get out there and work(not the "I'm every woman" attitude.) This alone brought on the arguments, which I have a photographic memory of. I would hear my father preaching repeatedly to my mother the importance of the Black family unit, as far as the woman staying OUT of the workplace in order to care for her family. My father was VERY pro-Black, and instilled the same ideals into his children. All I know is, nowadays, things are NOT the same. I, too, believe the "sleeping period" began in the mid-eighties..the crack epidemic, Reagan-omics, and the flood of illegal immigrants all played a hefty hand in fractionalizing the Black family unit. These days it seems civil rights are fought on an individual basis: an uprising here, a major court case there, never done on a collective basis. Either history will need to repeat itself, or we need to reinvent our definition of unity, freedom, and child rearing. I guess my generation has the gift and the curse
    Gift- having been born during post colonial days
    Curse- having been born at a time when Black unity was at its breaking point. I don't have much to say about unruly youth, or drugs/alcohol, since i never dealt or indulged in either of them. The most I can do is help heal my immediate environment, and convince others to do the same.:)
     
  3. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Excellent question Africana, one that can't be asked enough in my opinion. Speaking of which, IMHO the problem with the "civil rights movement" is that it became a Civil Rights Movement (being concerned about the rights of all races) instead of the "Black" Rights Movement it needed to be and should have always been!
     
  4. Africana

    Africana Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    To SpicyBrown: I agree with everything you said. One thing I think black people like ourselves should do is go around and awaken those who are sleeping and have them do the same things when they wake up. It just gets so frustrating sometimes when all I can do is sat back and talk about it. I want to take action.
     
  5. Africana

    Africana Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    To Panafrica: I never really thought about it in that way. With the additional problems on top of the fact that black rights were swept under the carpet as if we actually finally reached a point of equality and we haven't. I also think it was due to the fact that you and you're people have suffered for many years, you're not going to let them do the same to someone else. I agree with that too. I may be black, but if I see someone discriminating against another person because of their ethnic background I'm going to step in because I know how it feels and most importantly I know that it is wrong.
     
  6. Bisabee

    Bisabee Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I can relate to some younger Black people who wonder what happened to the civil rights movement and I can relate to some older Black people who were fighters during the civil rights period. The older people wonder why the youth don't take advantage of what they fought, sacrificed, and died for and the youth are wondering why the older people didn't continue to fight past integration. Some on both sides seem to be a bit disgusted with each other.

    I don't think either side understands the other. I relate more to the older people, but I think that what they don't understand about the younger people is that most younger people that I encounter (early 20s-early 30s who are peers of my 23 year old daughter) just don't have the convictions that the older people had. Many of the younger people are victims of commercialism. They don't seem to have enough substance whereas the older people have a lot more substance and convictions. What I sense is also that many of the younger people I meet don't seem to have a purpose in life, so they think that material things or sex or their boyfriend or girlfriend can be the purpose and goal of life. When that doesn't work, it leaves them angry or depressed and they continue to wander around looking for something to fill the void.

    So what happened to the civil rights movement is that the people with the convictions are old or too old to be on the front lines fighting anymore.
    I consider myself one of those older people. Many younger people don't want to listen to what we have to say. Many of us older people do keep talking and trying to advise younger people but many of them don't consider our convictions and knowledge to be valuable. But the ones who do listen are a lot better off than the ones who don't.
     
  7. I-khan

    I-khan Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It has been stated by Alton Maddox that:"The Civil Rights Movement was a consumer rights movement." And basically stated that the fight was a fight to consume someone elses hamburger and having to many conferences and meetings and rallies using the money to set up speechs when it could have been used to set up institutions.
     
  8. Bisabee

    Bisabee Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It seems that so many people these days try to put down what people did during the civil rights movement. What is Alton Maddox doing? What has he done?

    Why doesn't he start a movement and set up these institutions? For that matter, why doesn't anyone anywhere do this if they don't like what other people did or didn't do?
     
  9. I-khan

    I-khan Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have many of the same questions.
     
  10. I-khan

    I-khan Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It seems to me that the ideologies during that time period differed between those who wanted civil rights (equality) and those who wanted to overthrow the system and/or build their own societies(ie Black Wallstreet) without the help of the system itself.
     
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