Black Education / Schools : What educator did you or do you look up to and why?

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by MsInterpret, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What educator did you or do you look up to and why?

    I had a English teacher Ms. Jordan back in high school and at this school we only had a small amount of black teachers. To be honest, I think she was the only black teacher at my school.

    When I would skip class or school she was the only teacher who noticed me not in her class and would hold me after class to ask where and I was not in her class.

    She was always present while the other teachers would miss school themselves. And even though I missed most of her class she taught me to love writing and reading.

    I remember going into my senior year in HS and learning that she wasn't going to be teaching that year and I had really looked forward to her being my teacher again.

    She left and went to teach at a juvenile detention center, which I later went onto myself to teach at.

    I don't see her much now, but any chance I get when I do run into her I always make it a point to say "Hi" and tell her how much I greatly appreciated her.

    I had another black educator, I can't recall his name, who was my History teacher that I came across in Summer School. I thought he was nuts at first and he would talk about how the government was doing all this bad stuff. Like don't drink the milk it's got hormones, the government created AIDS to wipe out Blacks and Gays.

    It was obviously things that no other teacher would say, and I'm sure most of what he said wasn't even in the history books that we had for class.

    He was the first most PROBlack that I had ever met. And he opened my mind to a lot of things that I never really thought of until I met him.

    But I admire the fact that he didn't care what the Public School Admin would say. He felt that he was speaking the truth.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Oooh....good topic!


    Well, I kinda count all my Black teachers who came up in segregation and struggled for an education themselves (secondary and college) to go on and teach others, sharing their time and energy, in and out of the classroom, and even their own money to help a Black child.

    In particular:

    my h.s. basketball coach

    my elementary social studies teacher, Mrs. Wilson (may she rest in peace)...She attended Bethune-Cookman College when Dr. Mary McCleod Bethune was still alive and President there....I loved her stories about Dr. Bethune and college life and her as a teacher.....I was so thrilled to actually know somebody who actually knew Dr. Bethune! lol

    my piano teacher

    and so many others.....
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ...And these other teachers also planted in me my love for HBCUs and my own college choice as well as my love of Black history, our stories which are never told but by us.

    ...when our churches and communities joined together to help a youth through college with whatever they had to give...from giving their pennies and their food and clothing to a Black youth in college....sending "care packages" and encouragement to those away from home.

    ...how they sacrificed for a Black youth in college.

    That kind of love and unity is a beautiful thing....You didn't have to be related/kin to them...but just because you were "Black like me."
     
  4. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My African American studies teacher Pro. Elkahti...taught me about AA history as it relates to african history... also open my eyes to to the difference between Culture and ''Race''

    My advance literature teacher in high school Mr Greenberg...learned my first lessons in critical and analytic thinking in that class...i really liked his class because he wasn't classicist or an elitist... we would start off the class by first listening to our pick of rap, african, or rock music... then analyzed the lyrics after- very good class...

    If family counts, my grandfather and uncles- all educators.. who despite their religious views didn't espouse sexist and misogynist ideas about females and higher learning.
     
  5. nikknikk19

    nikknikk19 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    MY 5TH GRADE TEACHER

    IN THE 5TH GRADE I HAD A TEACHER FROM ST.VINCENT. HE WAS VERY STRICT AND HAD A THICK ACCENT. IF YOU TALKED DURING CLASS HE WOULD MAKE YOU HOLD TEXTBOOKS WHILE FACING THE WALL IN THE CORNER. IF YOU DROPPED THEM; HE ADDED ANOTHER ONE. AND WOULD THEN KEEP ADDING MORE AND MORE. HE WAS VERY ANIMATED AND NEVER LIMITED LESSONS TO WORKSHEETS AND OTHER HANDOUTS. HE'D TELL JOKES AND BRING TREATS FOR THE WELL BEHAVED. HE WAS THAT STRONG BLACK ROLE MODEL WHO DIDN'T TAKE "F___ERY" FOR AN ANSWER.
     
  6. Mikha'el

    Mikha'el Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    None....I appericate them for what they've given to me looking back....but look up to...No...i hated school n generally despised my teachers simply because i didnt like school

    my old history teacher mr mohammed was my favorite....he was very intresting n always had a story....he saw much potential in me n always raved about my smarts n now being in college i see what he saw now =]
     
  7. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    So you say "None", but in actuality you do, right? Mr. Mohammed?
     
  8. Mikha'el

    Mikha'el Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I dnt look up to him but i do respect him a lot
     
  9. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    After both of my parents....

    My first grade teacher Ms. Greene who taught me how to read and got me involved at an early age in acting.

    Two black men who were jr high teachers...Mr Peterson who taught science and was a vice principal, and my drafting teacher Mr. Yarbrough because both worked to bring out the best in me that my white teachers tried to suppress.

    My jr high pe and service teacher Mr. Kiino, who was a Pacific Islander from Hawaii becuase he was always real with me and caught me at times when I tended to roll with the wrong crowd or the wrong way.

    My high school counselor Mr. Braiman and my spanish teacher Ms. Weinberg because it was from them that I learned some white teachers actually have a conscience and care about their students.

    I had numerous educators in college who I looked up to, and still do because they taught me how to articulate what I knew intuitively but in an ideological framework of Black consciousness which I currently use in my own role as an educator.

    Among these would be two elders in my community, Dr. Alfred Ligon and his wife Berniece.


    As the operator of a store that became an obligatory stop for black
    writers promoting books in Los Angeles, Ligon was a well-known figure
    in Los Angeles' African-American community. Among those who held
    book-signing sessions at the Aquarian over the years were Maya Angelou,
    Alex Haley, Ossie Davis, John Henrik Clarke and Lerone Bennett.

    The store also came to be regarded as an intellectual beacon which, in
    the early stages of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, introduced
    young activists to black history and thought.

    "When I first started going to book stores I was amazed to see all the
    works of James Baldwin on one shelf in B. Dalton," said James Fugate,
    co-owner of Esowon Book Store, a competitor to the Aquarian in South
    Central Los Angeles. "But you never found black history. To go into a
    store like Aquarian and see all of those books displayed, even if you
    weren't looking for history or philosophy, opened your eyes to a whole
    different world."

    http://slick.org/deathwatch/mailarchive/msg00824.html
     
  10. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Oh my goodness, this just gave me a shock of reality. I started thinking and realized I started to feel like I'm in therapy or something. After thinking and going from the beginning of my formal training up through the years, I just realized I don't have 'a favorite teacher!--especially a Black teacher, not until I transferred from one college to an HBCU!

    I just relized that pretty much my whole early educational life was set in a predominantly white setting, or even at times, in all Black settings but still, I had white teachers! Now when I was living in the projects/parks, I moved around alot and don't remember the few Black teachers I had that well. I was moved about five times when I was in first grade and then moved around alot later, in second grade. I remember having a nice experience in third grade in an 'all black setting', but i didn't learn much. The Black teachers marvelled over me at how smart they said I had been, but I didn't learn much that year in that school. Prior to that year, I was sent back up north with my father's people and put back in an 'all white school' for half of the year and I remember learning much, then I was sent to Washington, DC, and my school experience was hellish. From 4th to 7th grade, I was in an all white setting and then shifted again and this shifting went on for years. However, I now realize that my most incredible teacher did not come into my life until I had went to an HBCU. She was an African American woman, a doctor, in my major and in the science department.

    I always like to reflect on her and she became what I wanted to be. She was so pretty, she had a calm spirit, but she was also firm. Like most of the Black professors, she would fuss at us at times, [Black students] about not being lazy and etc. She shared her struggles at how she had to fight to get her doctorates and what struck me was that she said, she had acheived this goal after she had gotten married and had two babies. What i heard was that she had support from her husband. She really inspired me and because she was one of my first teachers when I entered that school, that was all that i needed to get myself focused and in gear. From then on, I stretched out!...And she ended up liking me too! I became her top student in most of her classes! Years later, I met her oldest son, who was going to MIT at the time, and she wanted me to be with him!...But I knew i was not ready for such a wonderful guy at that time in my life, however, I will never forget this doctor, her husband who was also a doctor in Math at that college and her son!

    Also too, there were so many other awesome professors at that college too, that challeged me greatly in my academic studies. I have many stories I could tell about them! My experience there was so awesome! But I am now wondering where were they in my earlier years, or are there any significant number of Black teachers in the earlier years of Black kids' lives, because I now realize that they were not there for me. It must be by divine intervention that i was able to sustain until I arrived at that school!...because Man!--Now I'm thinking, 'What if I had given up?' If i had given up and become discouraged, I would have never known how great some of our people were in the educational field! Scary thought...

    Anyway, this is an awesome post!--An eye opener.
     
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