Pan Africanism : What Do You Think When You Hear / See PanAfricanism?

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Destee, Feb 2, 2004.

  1. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Hello Family,

    I admitted in another thread that i had no knowledge of this term prior to getting on the Internet. Therefore my thoughts were neither positive or negative regarding it.

    How familiar are you with this term?

    When did you first hear it? Where did you first hear it?

    How long have you been involved in PanAfrican efforts or discussions?

    Do you think negatively or positively, when you hear it?

    What, if anything, does PanAfricanism mean to you?

    If you don't know much about it, do you want to know and understand it better?

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  2. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Greetings Sister Des,

    Although I had heard the term Pan-African used here and there I really didn't have any knowledge about it until I came here less than a year ago. Like you, my curiousity was peaked as I read many discussions that included this word and what I read sounded so positive that I wanted to learn more about it. Here is a similar thread that I started about 8 months ago. It generated a lot of interesting discussion and it taught me alot. I'm sharing it here because it may be helpful to this discussion. I'm sure others will find it just as beneficial to them as it was to me.

    http://www.destee.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14148

    Peace and :heart:
    Queenie
     
  3. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    There is nothing mysterious about Pan Africanism

    Peace family,

    I first heard of Pan Africanism many years ago, probably because of W.E.B. DuBois’ connection. Most biographies and Black history books called DuBois the father of the Pan African movement.

    But to put Pan Africanism in a grassroots perspective, if people can see the connections between the following loose associations then they might start to understand the political and socio-cultural world of Pan Africanism. Pan Africanism has always had ideological connections with Black Nationalism and radicalism (think about Brother Malcolm, after leaving the NOI), African socialism/communalism (I said, “communalism”, not “communism”), W.E.B. DuBois, especially Marcus Garvey (back to Africa movement), Rastafarianism/Reggae and Bob Marley; even in an indirect sense, so-called world music and some forms of Jazz (all really African music), have sometimes expressed a common African world view.

    I think the first step to understanding Pan Africanism is to remove the political mysticism that surrounds it and put a human face on what some seem to think is an obscure term and idea.

    If you listen to Bob Marley’s music, most of his music is reflective of Pan Africanism and the life an African descendent exiled in the African Diaspora. This may be overly simplifying an intellectual social movement, but Marley’s music reflects the essence of the Pan African Movement, especially, as I have said, for Africans in the Diaspora, and has invoked a sense of Pan Africanism in many everyday Black folks from the so-called slums to the barrio’s.

    Just like Afro-centrism and Kwanzaa (which are also part of Pan African thinking) have intellectual and philosophical doctrines supporting their fundamental ideas, so does Pan Africanism. But, at the same time just like the before mentioned belief systems, Pan Africanism can be very idealistic and intrinsic. A Pan African philosophy can vary in interpretation and at times, is more of an philosophical umbrella, rather than an end all. Matter of fact Marcus Garvey and W.E.B. DuBois, both Pan Africanists, had very different ideologies.

    Pan Africanism is about the common interest of African people worldwide and a functional unification for the redevelopment of the African spirit, mind and community wherever it is.

    At this time, I’m purposely leaving out resource information because I think the link to the Pan African page posted by Sister NNQueen :bowdown: is extraordinary and full of timelines and information. Let me post that link again, below:

    http://www.destee.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14148

    Ashe,

    Brother Sun Ship
     
  4. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother SunShip ... we're missing you! :love:

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  5. abdurratln

    abdurratln Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Africans!

    One of the foremost leaders of the worldwide Pan-Africanist Movement today is the son of one of the greatest Pan-Africanists of all time; and a grandson of another. He is Brother Gamal Nkrumah.

    Brother Gamal is an editor at Al-Ahram Weekly in Cairo, Egypt. Please check out his work for this, one of Africa's greatest newspapers and has been for more than a century, on the internet. Just do an engine search under Al-Ahram Weekly.

    Brother Gamal also makes some very good and positive contributions to the development of Pan-Africanism for the newest generations of Africans and Arabs at BBC News, among other places. All you need to do is go to BBC News on the internet and type in Gamal Nkrumah. While you are there, you may wish to check out Kwame Nkrumah and Gamal Abd El-Nasser, the father and the grandfather of Brother Gamal respectively.

    I salute all on this thread for expressing an interest in Pan-Africanism. Pan-Africanism is, without doubt, the kay to solutions to the many problems facing the African Nation. Remember, each and every Arab and African has a contribution to make towards the development of Pan-Africanism. We are making contributions here. Thanks be to the Creator Supreme.
     
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