Pan Africanism : West African Adinkra symbols and meanings

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Jaimia, Aug 12, 2003.

  1. Jaimia

    Jaimia Member MEMBER

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  2. Jaimia

    Jaimia Member MEMBER

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    Hi

    Hi XXPANThaxx & Baba Ahmed

    I'm glad that it was useful to you both.
    Peace.
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Adinkra are visual symbols, originally created by the Akan of Ghana and the Gyaman of Cote d'Ivoire in West Africa, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used on fabric, walls, in pottery, woodcarvings and logos. Fabric adinkra are often made by woodcut sign writing as well as screen printing. They also can be used to communicate evocative messages that represent parts of their life or those around them.


    The Adinkra dictionary: A visual primer on the language of Adinkra by W. Bruce Willis ISBN 0-9661532-1-9

    Cloth as Metaphor: (re)reading the Adinkra cloth symbols of the Akan of Ghana by Dr. George F. Kojo Arthur. Legon, Ghana: Centre for Indigenous Knowledge Systems, 2001. 187, [6] p. 29 cm. ISBN 9988-0-0791-4

    African Accents: Fabrics and Crafts to Decorate Your Home by Lisa Shepard ISBN 0-87341-789-5

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adinkra
     
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