Black Spirituality Religion : Wearing Black to Funerals

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by truetothecause, Oct 23, 2008.

  1. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843
    I'm wondering if anyone can talk to me about the Spiritual or Ritualistic significance of wearing Black to funerals and during the "period" of mourning:?:



    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  2. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843
    Couple things I'm finding out...





    Having come to KNOW, that everything the E.D.(european descendants) people's "know", they obtained from US........the Blackness.....never say die.....keepa keep on!

    I'm seeking information from OUR Cultural, Spiritual, MetaPhysical, Universal...way out there somewhere.....deeper....KNOWledge.....[/FONT]

    Can you help me with that:?:


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  3. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843
    I suppose not:10500::bye:


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  4. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843
    I have to wonder why:?:
    This is something we've ALL participated in and shall continue to do.
    It's a "Ritual"
    Do ya'll all continue to practice the way we've been taught to do by white folk:?:
    Oh yes...some Black Mama/Papa/Sista/Brother is crying this very moment...as a loved one just made their transition.

    but...seems this topic is :censored:off limits....depressing....dark and dreary....sad....so let's not talk about it....


    OR...

    did I forget my "shower to shower" today:?:


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  5. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    100
    Occupation:
    HR/Finance
    Ratings:
    +103
    ;)

    Sister true :heart:

    I have attended only one funeral outside of SA and the widow wore Black - other than that I havent really "seen" it, outside of TV. I have never worn Black as sign of mourning (or to a funeral) and most funerals that I have attended people mostly wear their "sunday clothes"

    At funerals of ''prominant folk'', I often see the Shembe (oldest African Independent/Indigenous Church in South Africa) wearing white... and much traditional clothing representing the tribe of the deceased.

    I simply havent ever given it much thought. Funerals are often 'festive' - celebrating the passing of a loved one to what we assume is a better place, and celebrating the time they shared with us, here. As a youngster there was no better free party to crash than a funeral bash. Sounds nuts, but true.

    Anyway, clearly I cannot help you with the wearing of black significance..

    I will, however, give it more thought now!
     
  6. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843

    Thank You for Sharing with me SiS Zulile :couple:

    As my mother moves along on her journey to another time and space this question is on my mind. I thing aobut what Im going to wear, what did we wear before we did things the white way...what are other peoples experiences, traditions beliefs etc.
    Either this topic is to real for people....cause I don't see "death" as gloomy, depressing etc....In fact, I experince myself being part of my mom's re-birthing process. This in many ways is cause for celebration. Yes, I'm taking the "good with the bad" and I feel incredible sadness as well. I mean, after all, this IS my Mother!

    Another thought I had as to the limited responses here....people are simply not interested in talking to "me" .....personally. Yes...I'm feeling this personal prolly because this thread was initiated out of a very real and personal experience. And maybe, just maybe, that's another reason why folk are non-responsive...this is a very "personal" journey.....watching one's Mother journeying towards transition.

    Anywho....as I'm going through this process...my thoughts did go to the whole funeralization we engage in. Knowing that EVERYTHING we think we know and that which we practice....was stolen information and covered up with a bunch of white-out.
    I am still seeking any knowledge of alternative funeral practices and more specially, those of our ancient coustoms. I am listening with an ear towards practice on something different in honor of my Mother.

    Thanks for Listening....


    M.E
    :hearts2:
     
  7. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843
    So I'm thinking

    since it seems OK to talk about "death" now....


    maybe someone of you have some thoughts on this:?:

    any takers...or....Metaphysical thinking here:?:

    Also, I think I've attempted to have conversations in the past about "death" and they went NO where so I am feeling "some type of way".

    Anywho....


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  8. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843
    btw

    I choose Red, Black and Green as the colors as I honored my Mother during her "service":em0100:


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  9. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,822
    Sister, I'm not shy of death, but honestly, I do not know what the religious or spiritual significance of black at funerals or mourning actually means.

    I have my thoughts, but I'm no expert. Perhaps one of our resident scholars will drop the 411 on us.

    Blackbird
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    Although, not a definitive answer, this is what I found:


    Continental Europe
    The custom of wearing unadorned black clothing for mourning dates back at least to the Roman Empire, when the Toga pulla made of dark-colored wool was worn during periods of mourning......

    In rural areas of Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Greece widows wear black for the rest of their lives. The immediate family members of the deceased wear black for an extended period of time.

    The color of deepest mourning among medieval European queens was white rather than black. This tradition survived in Spain until the end of the fifteenth century, and was again practiced by the Spanish-born Belgian Queen Fabiola of King Baudouin's funeral. It was the custom for the Queens of France to wear deuil blanc or "white mourning"; this is the origin of the "white wardrobe" created by Norman Hartnell for Queen Elizabeth, later the Queen Mother, in 1938, when she was required to make a state visit to France while in mourning for her mother.

    United Kingdom
    By the nineteenth century, mourning behavior in England had developed into a complex set of rules, particularly among the upper classes. Women bore the greatest burden of these customs. They involved wearing heavy, concealing, black clothing, and the use of heavy veils of black crêpe...

    Africa

    "..Bark cloth, a rough traditional fabric, was worn in some communities to denote that family members were in mourning. White garments are also used; following the advent of Christianity, black garments were worn, following European custom.

    In Ethiopia, an edir (or iddir) is a traditional community organization in which the members assist each other during the mourning process. Members make monthly financial contributions forming the Edir's fund and they will be entitled to receive a certain sum of money from this fund, the rate of which varies based on how close the deceased is to the Edir member. The purpose for such payment is to help cover the funeral and other expenses associated with the death. In addition, female members of the Edir take turns to do the house work like preparing food for the mourning family and people coming to comfort them. Usually, the male members take the responsibility to arrange the funeral, erect a temporary tent to shelter guests who come to visit the mourning family. Edir members are also required to stay with the mourning family and comfort them for three full days..."

    http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Mourning
     
Loading...