Black People : Washington and Arne Duncan, trying to return school segregation?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Mar 5, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    No Child Left Behind, the wonder-product of the NEocon vultures, planned to make Charter schools the in thing and disenfranchise public schools to the point , with budget cuts, that the teachers in innercity schools ,
    would have less or no resources to work with causing lower performance.
    The solution;
    Fire the teachers,
    Close the schools,

    and scare parents into the Charter School System, costing them precious dollars during a hard economic time.
    Now it is amazing that a Democratic administration would, continue and enhance such a policy;

    which has created defacto jim Crow, in many states, leaving Black children "Left Behind"

    Published on Thursday, February 11, 2010 by MinnPost.com
    Race to the Top? Critic says Education Plan Takes Advantage of Public School and State 'Desperation'
    Charter School Report Finds Widespread Segregation, Including in Minnesota
    by Beth Hawkins

    Charter schools are more racially isolated than traditional schools in virtually every state and large city in the country, according to a new report released by the University of California at Los Angeles. In the Midwest, more than half of charter students in 2007-2008 were black, in large part because charters are most often located in urban settings, researchers at UCLA's Civil Rights Project found.

    In Minnesota, the report [PDF] found, much of this segregation can be attributed to the fact that many urban charters are targeted at students of a single race or ethnicity. By contrast, in the western United States, where traditional schools are typically more diverse, charters "are havens for white re-segregation from public schools," researchers reported.

    The report comes at a time when public attention is focused on the Obama administration's first marquee education initiative, the controversial Race to the Top program. Forty states have applied for the federal grants, which are intended to recognize efforts at innovation. Among other things, the program includes financial incentives to expanding the number of charter schools.

    "The states are financially desperate and will do almost anything to keep from firing teachers in the next couple of years," UCLA Professor and Civil Rights Project Co-Director Gary Orfield told Minnpost. "We think [the Obama administration] are taking advantage of that desperation."

    Charters do not have to provide much of the programming traditional public schools are required to offer, such as services to English-language learners. This results in an unequal playing field. "We're not asking that charters be shut, we're not asking that charters not be expanded," he said. "We're asking that they be held to the same civil rights requirements."

    More and more charter schools.....

    full article;
    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2010/02/11-7
     
  2. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I am by no means of charter reform, or the charter school movement, I do recognize some obvious flaws in the argument presented here. I do recognize that racial demographics vary so I will just speak to observations focused in California, Los Angeles in particular.

    First of all, I have worked in four school districts which during the late 70s-80s were transformed into districts with sections of predominantly Black schools, to predominanatly chicano/Latino: Lynwood, Compton, Inglewood, LAUSD. In each instance, when traditional school instruction went into bilingual methodology, Black students began to become underserved, increasingly the historical academic achievement gap that was still of a system that was racially segregated. For example, students in adjacent Watts, Jordan HS in particular, were bused to nearby South Gate in the 70s, when South Gate was predominantly white, and were met with hostile whites which led to virtual race riots on campus. This is one reason why Black "gangs" formed not only at Jordan HS, but other schools in the Black community where Black students were bused to the San Fernando Valley. As minority teaching staffs increased, along with white flight, the classified management of these districts remained largely in the hands of whites with senority. Im not talking about cetificated personnel. Im talking about the one sector which is rarely mentioned in the entire charter school debate. The white folks who run the business section, the facilities management, the budgeting and finance, etc.

    Secondly, as an educational consultant with over 20 years as a public school instructor, where my last 2 were as a UTLA site rep, local school leadership and school site council member, I had access to demographic and testing data, much of which my principal shared with me, that was inaccessbile to the majority of staff. Once I carefully examined senority lists and found the wide useage of "ethnic codes" on all aggregated data it bacame obvious to me the various "tracking" methods that were still in use and how they were also being disguised.

    So this is a fraction of what I found. Due to rising enrollment of Latinos and Korean students, Black student population in LAUSD schools dropped below previous level, below the 14% service population. Accordingly, student achievement dropped below levels of previous proficiency levels because the student population declined.

    As Black student populations decline in in traditional school, Korean and Latino immersion programs become emphasized along with increased mainstreaming and inclusion of at-risk or spec-ed population.

    Black students are not just leaving the system but moving into magnet programs where levels of academic proficiency are generally assessed more in parity with overall representation. This means if Black studnets in magnet programs score about 14% higher on standardized performance tests its in direct proportion to increase of 14% in magnet program participation. Same is evident in charter schools, which demonstrate higher overall levels of proficiency higher than traditional, but lag behind magnet school participation with roughly sam demographic. 14% in relation to overall 14% of Black population in California. In areas where Black population exceeds national average, I need to do further study to determine charter school success.

    However, one thing for sure, at least in Los Angeles. Charter school reform is being driven by the private sector, and is becoming increasingly embraced by Black parent and student advocay groups because Black studnets are proving to score higher, while the public school traditional seeting only plays lip service to adressing the academic achievement gap.

    And as more teachers are laid off, the first impacted are younger Black teachers entering into the work force, since they often not only lack senority, but are offered temporary contracts (overwhelmingly) to begin with, or teaching vacancies are filled with day to day subs so the districts can slash health benefits and shortchange tenured teachers but enforcing mandatory furloughs---without cutting bbureaucracy at the top.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The problem is that there is no record to date in regards

    to the claims of charter school excellence since the statistics show thatthe majority of charter schools are doing on par or at times worse.
    The fact remain that there are 50 states with many different situations, but in general per city,
    no great influx of other minorities, only regentrification and whites moving in.

    Folks who have worked in education for many years understand full well that the innercity schools are less publicly funded then those in the city within the well to-do areas.
    And under this old neocon con game of seeking privitization, while folks wallets are strapped,

    it is in these majority Black districts that teachers are being fired and schools being closed.

    http://www.wmich.edu/wmu/news/2007/04/014.html
     
  4. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    We need to be back in our own schools...period.
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That is the point however, the economic factor is nedded first, cause without the collective economics to support such an endeavor where will we be?
    True we have been saying that since Garvey's time and all through the 60s but, with all of our technology and money do we at least have a home schooling course available on the web for parents who are fed
    up???

    What is said is understood but , the law is that as of this minute our children must attend this system until 16, therefore since we are paying for it anyway, we should demand something real, rather then some bull mess!!!
     
  6. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Brother Kwame used to say, "No participation, no right to observation. No investigation, no right to speak." I did mention the difference in racial demographics. The article does state a problem with charter reformers leveraging funding. This is the fundamental problem. However, the issue of white gentrification is, again, a matter of demographics. A larger part of the picture is "Black flight" away from the inner-city, and rising immigrant populations which effect the nature in which education is delivered. Quite frankly, if Black teachers are not functional in non-primary (bilingual) language instruction they are at-risk of losing positions as secondary language and english language development classes become a primary mode of instruction.

    "No great influx of other minorities"

    This may be true in your part of the planet but its certainly not true in southern Califronia, and it was not true when I worked in north Texas (Collin County).
     
  7. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Like you say about observation, and as Kwame is mentioned both Kwames,

    my concern is not just Brooklyn or my isolated little area, but the diaspora of those of African descent, because the purpoe of posting a Kwame Toure post is to illustrate the aspect of the evolutionas he spoke of the collective effort for the common good

    rather then isolationalism and the European Asili
     
  8. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    No isolationist view on my part. I'm speaking from experience working in one of the largest and most culturally diverse school systems on the planet. One which reflects a dynamism relative to rapid demographic change where Black parents are taking initiative in recognition of the failing traditional, mass schooling system which only plays lip service to closing achievement gaps. The same system which disproportionatly treats Black youth as criminals within the system as reflective of higher than norm suspension rates as well as escalating dropout rates.

    I have minimal response to your query in regards to Nguzo Saba since I am more familiar with its principles and are more concerned with application of Kawaida, not its theoretical component. Peace!
     
  9. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well, unfortunately, the Obama administration has adopted and is building on the foundation of No Child Left Behind. And as I explain in this book, I believe that No Child Left Behind has been a failed policy, that it’s dumbed down the curriculum, narrowed the curriculum. Our kids are being denied a full education, because so much time is being spent on test prep and on tests that are really not very good tests and, in some cases, even fraudulent scoring of the test. The kids are getting a worse education as a result of No Child Left Behind.

    The Obama administration, however, has bought into this rhetoric of accountability and choice, and they’re actually taking the Bush policies to a greater extreme. There is more support from the administration, this administration, for choice, because they have no opposition in the Congress, because it’s a Democratic president and because they had all this money, this $5 billion, to use as play money with no authorization, no oversight from Congress.

    They’ve said to the states in the “Race to the Top,” this competition that was just held, that the requirements to be considered are, first of all, that the states have to be committed to privatizing many, many, many public schools. These are called charter schools. They’re privatized schools. The Bush administration would have never gotten away with that, because Congress would have stopped them.

    They’ve also required states to commit to evaluating teachers by the test scores of their students, which means that that will put even more emphasis on standardized testing, more drill down of test prep, more emphasis on basic skills. And also, it’s a very unfair measure, because it means that the students who live in poor communities, that they’re likely to get small gains, whereas the kids in the affluent communities will get big gains. And so, we’ll see the third emphasis of the Obama plan, which is close low-performing schools.

    And Obama has said that he wants to see 5,000 low-performing schools transformed or closed, as we saw just recently in Rhode Island, where the only high school in a desperately poor community is supposed to fire all the teachers, close the school. And I think this is a terrible thing for public education. And I think we’re going to see a devastation of public education over the next—however long this president is in office, unless he changes course, which I hope he will, and doubt that he will.

    small exerpt from the full article and video;
    http://www.democracynow.org/2010/3/5/protests
     
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