Black People : Want to stop Taliban and Al Qeada? Stop Asian heroin trade

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Simply by freezing the assets of the major banks who are using laundered money to stay afloat would put a serious dent in the capacity of the 100 Al Queda(Gen McCrystal) and the taliban claimed to follow them.
    Eradication or replacement of opium production in Afghanistan, would not bring on Washington's fears of organized crimes reprisals (Frank Marcello-JFK)
    since the dope will still flow to fund the chosen families, from opium crops in Columbia.

    In other words based on the fact that every bullet bomb and torture device used by the so called terrorists comes from heroin, the above measures make it clear that there is no need for any US troops in Afghanistan or Pakistan
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Taliban and al-Qaeda don't grow the opium poppies. Their involvement is higher up the drug chain, where profits are fatter, and so is their cut of the deal. Yasini says the terrorists receive a share of profits in return for supplying gunmen to protect labs and convoys. Recent busts have revealed evidence of al-Qaeda's ties to the trade. On New Year's Eve, a U.S. Navy vessel stopped a small fishing boat in the Arabian Sea. After a search, says a Western antinarcotics official, "they found several al-Qaeda guys sitting on a bale of drugs." In January U.S. and Afghan agents raided a drug runner's house in Kabul and found a dozen or so satellite phones. The phones were passed on to the CIA station in Kabul, which found that they had been used to call numbers linked to suspected terrorists in Turkey, the Balkans and Western Europe. And in March U.S. troops searching a suspected terrorist hideout in Oruzgan province found opium with an estimated street value of $15 million.

    Antidrug officials say the only way to cut off al-Qaeda's pipeline is to destroy the poppy farms. U.S. military commanders have been reluctant to commit the nearly 20,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan to opium eradication, fearing that doing so would divert attention from the hunt for terrorists. The U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, has tapped top Drug Enforcement Administration official Harold Wankel to lead an intensified drive to nail kingpins, shut down heroin-production labs, eradicate poppy fields and persuade farmers to plant food crops. If the drug cartels aren't stopped, the U.S. fears, they could sow more chaos in Afghanistan — which al-Qaeda and the Taliban could exploit to wrest back power. Miwa Kato, a Kabul-based officer for the U.N.'s Office on Drugs and Crime, puts it this way: "The opium problem has the capacity to undo everything that's being done here to help the Afghans." Few outcomes would please America's enemies more.



    Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101040809-674777,00.html#ixzz0YeTtIKQY
     
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