Black People : Valentine's Day...Did you know...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Sun Ship, Feb 14, 2004.

  1. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The symbol of love (the red heart) that many Valentine Day observers give to their lovers and mothers is the representation of the females, Labia minora. Most historians and researchers agree that this symbol is not a depiction of a heart. The fact that this day was designated as a day for ritualizing fertility in ancient Rome, along with other evidence, have led many researchers to this conclusion.

    Besides "just" look at it, I think its shape speaks louder than words.

    Share what you know about this day.

    Peace :luvv:


    Sun Ship
    :D
     
  2. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Wow . . . Brother Sun Ship . . . that is interesting news. I never knew that. I might be one of a very few that don't celebrate Valentine's Day anymore because it just seems like another day that commercial retailers jump on to make more money in the name of love. Flowers, candy, red hearts, candlelight dinners and endless numbers of "I love you's" . . . one day a year.

    If this was an ancient Roman ritual to celebrate fertility, since it's still being practiced today, nine months later, I wonder how many babies will be born.

    But the whole red labia minora correlation is quite interesting and makes a lot of sense, since that part of a female's anatomy is the brightest red and swollen when she's sexually stimulated.

    It really pays to study these modern day rituals, doesn't it?

    :heart:

    Queenie :spinstar:
     
  3. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Thank You Brother Sun Ship ... i'll never look at a :heart: the same again!

    :look:

    Destee
     
  4. Nita

    Nita Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wow

    I agree with Des...
    Nice info Bro.

    Nita :heart:
     
  5. Sun Ship

    Sun Ship Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Just something to think about

    Below are several different informative excerpts about Valentine's Day


    Valentine's Day

    Just how did it come about?

    Once upon a time… In ancient Rome, February 14th was a holiday to honor Juno. Juno was the Queen of the Roman Gods and Goddesses. The Romans also knew her as the Goddess of women and marriage. The following day, February 15th, began the 'Feast of Lupercalia' (festival of the wolf) which was one of the most important in Imperial Rome.

    For eight hundred years prior to the establishment of Valentine's Day, the Romans had practiced a pagan celebration in mid-February commemorating young men's rite of passage to the god Lupercus. The celebration featured a lottery in which young men would draw the names of teenage girls from a vase. During the festival, the pairs of children danced and played together. The girl assigned to each young man in that manner would be his sexual companion during the remaining year. Often, they would fall in love and would later marry.

    In an effort to do away with the pagan festival, Pope Gelasius ordered a slight change in the lottery. Instead of the names of young women, the box would contain the names of saints. Both men and women were allowed to draw from the box, and the game was to emulate the ways of the saint they drew during the rest of the year. Needless to say, many of the young Roman men were not too pleased with the rule changes.

    Although the lottery for women had been banned by the church, the mid-February holiday in commemoration of St. Valentine was stilled used by Roman men to seek the affection of women. It became a tradition for the men to give the ones they admired handwritten messages of affection, containing Valentine's name. This may have been the festival that was later named after the former saint -- Valentine's Day. It all started many centuries ago, during those times when being a Christian was against the law.

    __________________________________________



    Lupercalia: A "Feverish" Festival

    We may owe our observance of Valentine's Day to the Roman celebration of Lupercalia, a festival of eroticism that honored Juno Februata, the goddess of "feverish" (febris) love. Annually, on the ides of February, love notes or "billets" would be drawn to partner men and women for feasting and sexual game playing.

    From Sinful to Saintly?

    Early Christians, clearly a dour bunch, frowned on these lascivious goings-on. In an attempt to curb the erotic festivities, the Christian clergy encouraged celebrants to substitute the names of saints. Then, for the next twelve months, participants were to emulate the ideals represented by the particular saint they'd chosen. Not too surprisingly, this prudish version of Lupercalia proved unpopular, and died a quick death.

    Easier to Do: Substitute Romance for Eroticism

    But the early Christians were anything but quitters, so it was on to Plan B: modulate the overtly sexual nature of Lupercalia by turning this "feast of the flesh" into a "ritual for romance!"

    This time, the Church selected a single saint to do battle the pagan goddess Juno -- St. Valentine (Valentinus). And since Valentinus had been martyred on February 14, the Church could also preempt the annual February 15 celebration of Lupercalia. The only fly in the ointment was Valentinus himself: he was a chaste man, unschooled in the art of love.

    _________________________________________________



    February was a month for questionable fertility rites. In the beginning, Roman boys were greased and sent running naked through the streets with whips made from the hide of freshly slaughtered goats. Others, especially women, would gather to watch the spectacle, edging close to be struck -- a whipping was a certain sign of impending pregnancy and easy childbirth.

    As Rome evolved scientifically, people figured out a way to make the correlation between February and pregnancy even more certain. Rather than greasing those pubescent boys, the emperor had them draw lots. Each lot bore the name of a girl, to whom the boy was bound for the next year in what amounted to a do-it-yourself crash course in sex ed. Marriage was optional.

    Useful as these unions proved from the standpoint of population growth and social stability, the system was too carnal for God's proto-Victorian tastes. So when the church took control of Rome, it also took it upon itself to replace the names of girls to be deflowered with those of saints to be venerated. Which is how celibate St. Valentine got entangled in the sordid affair

    _______________________________________



    For many in the Earthwise community that heart symbol is our version of Sheila-Na-Gig. This concept has been discussed by feminists for many years, and was recently re-stated by Gloria Steinem in her wonderful forward to The Vagina Monologues. She writes:

    "...the shape we call a heart -- whose symmetry resembles the vulva far more than the asymmetry of the organ that shares its name -- is probably a residual female genital symbol. ...I thought of this while watching little girls drawing hearts in their notebooks, even dotting their i's with hearts, and I wondered: Were they magnetized by this primordial shape because it was so like their own bodies?"


    Peace :luvv:
     
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