Black Spirituality Religion : Use of the Psalms

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Amnat77, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ps. xxxviii.: Against defamation. xxxix.: Against evil design on the part of the king. xl.: Against evil spirits. xli.: When one's position has been given to another. xlii.: In interpretation of dreams. xliii.: In a storm at sea (M.V. 35). xliv.: To escape from an enemy. xlv.: Against a wicked woman. xlvi.: When one tires of his wife. xlvii.: To win favor. xlviii.: To frighten one's enemies. xlix.: Against fever. Verse 6, against pollution (M.V. 62). l.: Against enemies and robbers (Grünw., against noxious animals). li.: When one feels guilty. Verse 3, against loss of blood (Heim, 520). lii.: To keep off slander. liii.: To frighten one's foes. liv. and lv.: To be avenged on one's foes. lvi.: When in chains; also against evil inclination. lvii.: To have good fortune. lviii.: Against vicious dogs. lix.: Against evil inclination. lx.: Before a battle. lxi.: Upon entering a house where one has cause for apprehension. lxii.: For forgiveness of sins. lxiii.: On accounting with one's business partner, and to have good fortune in trade. lxiv.: On fording a river. lxv.: To exert influence over anybody. lxvi.: Against evil spirits. lxvii.: Against continuous fever, also for a prisoner. This psalm, written upon parchment in the form of a "menorah" (branched candlestick), and surrounded by moral sentences, is frequently found printed in It is claimed that the psalm was engraved upon David's shield in this form. Without the superscription, it contains seven verses and forty-nine words, the fifth verse, counting the dageshed מ as two, contains forty-nine letters. It is owing to the first fact that this psalm is used together with Ps. cxliv. in the ritual at the departure of the Sabbath. For the connection of David with the departure of Sabbath, see "Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für. Jüdische Volkskunde," i. 76. On the second fact is based the reading of this psalm in the forty-nine days of 'Omer (see 'Omer), between Passover and Pentecost. The Catholic Church also designates a special psalm for daily recital between Easter and Pentecost (see Grünw. 109). lxviii.: Against evil spirits (Grünw., as an exorcism for travelers' use). lxix.: Against evil longing. lxx.: Before a battle (Grünw., to appease an enemy). lxxi.: In

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  2. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The use of the Bible for magic or superstitious purposes. The practise of employing sacred books, or words and verses thereof, for divination or for magic cures is universal alike among pagans and believers in God. What the Vedas were to the Hindus (Stenzler, "Abhandlungen für die Kunde des Morgenlandes," vol. vi., Leipsic, 1878), Homer to the Greeks (Heim, pp. 496, 514), and Ovid and Virgil to the Romans (Lampridius, "Alexander Severus," p. 14; "Sortes Virgiliauæ"), the Old Testament was to the Jews, the Old and New Testaments to the Christians (Kraus, s.v. "Loos," ii. 344; "Sortes Sanctorum"; compare i. 153, "Evangeliorum"), and the Koran and Hafiz to the Mohammedans (Lane, "An Account of the Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians," vol. xi.). The desire of man to discern the hidden future, or to obtain the mastery over nature in hours of great anxiety, by some superstitious resort to superhuman forces, is never altogether extinct in the multitude. Deut. vi. 8, 9; xi. 18; and Prov. iii. 22-26, vii. 3, admonishing the people to bind them (the words of God) as a sign upon the hand, and have them as frontlets between the eyes, and to write them upon the posts of the house and upon the gate, certainly induced the Jews to use the Bible, or parts of it, for protective or talismanic purposes (Targ. to Cant. viii. 3; Ber. 23b; Yer. Peah i. 15d). Likewise are the sixty letters of the Priestly nullBlessing (Num. vi. 24-26) called sixty guardian powers of Israel against the terrors of the night (Cant. R. to iii. 7; Tan. Num. 16; compare Pesiḳ. R. 5 and Num. R. xii.), "a talisman against the evil eye." So was Ps. xci., perhaps originally composed as an incantation psalm (see Psalms) and known in rabbinical literature as "Shir shel Pega'im," or "Song against Demons," employed as a protective (Midr. Teh. to Ps. xci.; Yer. Shab. vi. 8b), found also in a tomb at Kertch, Crimea (Blau, "Das Alt. Jüdische Zauberwesen," p. 95). Ps. iii. was employed for that purpose (Shebu. 15b); Ex. xv. 26 was used for healing purposes, according to Mishnah Sanh. x. 1; as was also Lev. i. 1, according to Sanh. 101a. To ward off evil dreams, the Rabbis prescribe the recitation of corresponding Bible verses (Ber. 55b, 56b); in order to escape the danger befalling one who drinks uncovered water on Wednesday and Saturday nights, the recitation of Ps. xxix. is prescribed (Pes. 112a). Tos., Shab. xiii. 4; Shab. 115b, writings containing Biblical matter used for amulets, are mentioned, which Blau (l.c. p. 96) compares with two magic papyri of the second or third century showing a Jewish origin; the one published by Deissmann (pp. 21-48), the other by Dieterich, "Abraxas," pp. 138 et seq., both of which prove the use of Biblical passages for magic purposes.



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