Black People : US Court of Appeals: The Internet is a Plantation, With Comcast, Verizon, AT&T Its Masters

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by RAPTOR, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    by BAR managing editor Bruce A. Dixon

    Thanks to a ruling by the US Circuit Court of Appeals in DC, telecom companies are free to dictate every aspect of what you can and cannot see, hear or do over the internet. It's an emergency. It's time to demand immediate presidential intervention to head off the end of the internet as we know it.

    "This is one of those ground breaking, those earth shaking moments that reveal how capitalism works..."
    “Network neutrality” on the internet is the idea that anyone can access it, with any device to view or contribute any content. Network neutrality is the foundation of the internet as we have known it. According to the federal court of appeals in DC, network neutrality on the internet is now over.

    From this point on, the court has ruled, internet providers can levy extra tolls upon, slow down or , simply ban any content or any users they choose, for any reason whatsoever. Internet companies can now tell you which hardware and software devices, what kinds of computers, phones, programs and applications you may or may not use, and from which locations.
    The internet is now a plantation, with Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon its masters, and the rest of us serfs or worse.
    This is one of those ground breaking, those earth shaking moments that reveal how capitalism works, how greedy corporations have captured the media, the courts and the other two bipartisan branches of government in these United States. This ruling is anything but a surprise. It's what the telecom companies have demanded for years, and what the administrations of President Bush and Obama alike seem determined to give them.

    President Obama did campaign declaring he would take a back seat to nobody in fighting for network neutrality. The White House has occasionally, though increasingly feebly renewed that pledge. But Obama's first FCC chief was Julius Genakowski, a former telecom lobbyist who wrote the 1990s laws privatizing the internet backbone, which was built with taxpayer dollars, giving it to telecom companies like Comcast and AT&T for pennies on the dollar. Under this notorious privatizer, the FCC did almost nothing to assert the public right, to advance the public demand for a free and open internet, to head off this disastrous ruling of corporate rights over public property which was clearly in the pipeline. It's not the first time this or any president or Congress has campaigned on the public interest, but governed in the corporate interest, and telecom companies are always big campaign contributors.
    Read more: http://www.blackagendareport.com/content/us-court-appeals-internet-plantation-comcast-verizon-att-its-masters
     
  2. anAfrican

    anAfrican Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    maybe this could be a good thing in that it might further spur "people's wireless" efforts.

    for instance:
    <snip>
    ...
    WiFi uses an unlicensed spectrum at 2.4 gigahertz, a frequency that is shared by microwave ovens and cordless phones, .. and a frequency that anyone can use for free. And use it is just what people are starting to do! And in surprising ways.

    In a movement that is reminiscent of the beginning of the open source software projects, individual wireless networking enthusiasts are joining forces in London, San Francisco, Cambridge Mass., New York, NY and other cities around the globe, and are developing and deploying free high speed wireless networks that anyone with a network card can access. It seems wireless communities are springing up all over.
    A wireless community, also called a Neighborhood Area Network (NAN) or a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN), lets you connect to the Internet cheaply and quickly. NANs are created when one or more people put up an 802.11b access point (AP), to cover a small geographic area. The coverage of a standard AP such as the Apple "AirPort" usually covers only one hundred square meters or so, but this can be extended up to 1 kilometer in radius if the AP owner uses an omnidirectional antenna. Neighbors participating in the NAN would then use a directional antenna pointed back at the AP, set up their own AP and then their neighbors will point back to them to connect and then they set up ...and so on, and so on, until you have the beginnings of a Metropolitan Area Network.
    ...
    <snip>
     
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