Black People : Urban Agriculture - November 2003

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Gary C. Booker, Nov 28, 2003.

  1. Gary C. Booker

    Gary C. Booker Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    THE MANTIDOTE
    November 2003


    Sincerest apologies for the abscence folks... I’ve been occupied with a gazillion things. Nonetheless, I have not forgotten everybody and I have had to sit down and say, Gary... get your behind to typing this mantidote. So I did. In this particular issue, I will talk about the importance of African Americans becoming an Agricultural force here in America. Agriculture is a huge part of the worlds economy and as long as there are humans (and pets) that need to eat, it will always be that way. That includes us! We have to eat! Since this is around the Thanks-taking... excuse me... thanksgiving holidays where everyone’s mind is on food, I will discuss this subject.

    Among this fact remains three particular facts that we should note:
    · African Americans remain the highest spending consumers in the entire world despite the fact that we still have the least amount of assets amongst ethnic groups in the United States.
    · African American dishes are amongst the most favored in the world. The term soul food is respected in lands as far away as France, Japan and Thailand as refering to the most delicious of American dishes to try when visiting. Yet, we take for granted the respect that soul food dishes have and are failing to capitalize on that by becoming not only a powerful, but dominant force in the resturaunt industry.
    · African Americans still struggle to get fair treatment in the agriculture industry. The fact remains that the market is still just as heavily controlled by whites as it was during the days of slavery with little transitional change for the better.

    The agriculture barrier stands in our way of accomplishing a lot. Black Nationalist organizations should really pay more attention to this issue. A nation’s power is determined by it’s ability to produce as well as to consume. Black people are doing plenty of producing in terms of commerce... but not for ourselves! All of our intellectuals must work for non employers (not to mention going through a lot of hooplah to do so) so that they can get paid a fraction for what they are worth... and turn to white entities to buy their food to feed their families at RIDICULOUSLY HIGH PRICES CHARGED TO THEM SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY LIVE IN BLACK COMMUNITIES.

    Here’s the beginning of the solution... we have to start growing our own food. The Tanya Archer Community Resource Center Project, which I am the chairman of, is creating a sub-organization called The Urban Carver Project. The Urban Carver Project will be the governing body of all Urban Agricultural Research Centers throughout the Tanya Archer Center Project. The Urban Agriculture Research Centers will focus on Urban Agriculture and maximizing it’s potential to begin a large scale self-production effort within the Black Community starting with it’s most basic need... FOOD
     
  2. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Glad I got around to reading this...

    I'd love to know more about how this works and who are involved. Years ago as a hobby, I studied and learned how to plan a vegetable garden. The money I saved in grocery bills however, convinced me that it was more than just a hobby, but a worthwhile venture.

    Through my research and experimenting, I learned a concept called intensive gardening which is about growing a large amount of fruits and vegetables, including vertically, using a small amount of ground space. In my small back yard I produced enough organically grown fruits and vegetables to feed my entire neighborhood. I also taught myself how to can (even my own recipes) and freeze my harvest and compost the waste. I also learned how to properly prepare soil and reintroduce nutrients to produce the healthiest and finest crops and build tools to keep harmful insects and animals, including those that burrow, away. I even learned how to grow vegetables outside in the middle of winter using cloaching devices and frames. On a much larger scale, we can produce tons of fresh fruits, vegetables and grains year round.

    Has anyone ever thought of researching tree farming or fish farming? Do you know how valuable a pine tree is and how fast they grow? It's also a tree where nothing is wasted so you can make money from it in many ways. Blacks consume a lot of fish. How about raising your own? :) FOOD will always be in demand don't you think?
     
  3. Gary C. Booker

    Gary C. Booker Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Peace again, Sister Queen

    You are a community resource,
    You see this is what I am talking about. Black people have some knowledge! We just have to get around to using it collectively to do for ourselves! I really hope that the Bush years will provide a lesson to some black people on how we are effected when the economy goes awry. Moving forward, we must produce programs in communities that allow it's members to help that community achieve agronomical independence.

    Imagine this... if you and a few others decided to take your kids out of a school and home school them, you all could take a day off to teach all of the kids. One person for each school day of the week could provide a series of lessons. In your case, you could teach canning and growing as ecology experements. Hook up with a progressive black church or mosque and they could assist with funding and providing land for a community greenhouse.

    I plan to begin working on this in 2005 (right around the corner). We should talk soon. :)

    GCB
     
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