Black Christians : Unicorns In the Bible

Discussion in 'Christian Study Group' started by cherryblossom, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Num.23

    1. [22] God brought them out of Egypt; he hath as it were the strength of an unicorn.
    Num.24

    1. [8] God brought him forth out of Egypt; he hath as it were the strength of an unicorn: he shall eat up the nations his enemies, and shall break their bones, and pierce them through with his arrows.
    Deut.33

    1. [17] His glory is like the firstling of his bullock, and his horns are like the horns of unicorns: with them he shall push the people together to the ends of the earth: and they are the ten thousands of Ephraim, and they are the thousands of Manasseh.
    Job.39

    1. [9] Will the unicorn be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?
    2. [10] Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?
    Pss.22

    1. [21] Save me from the lion's mouth: for thou hast heard me from the horns of the unicorns.
    Pss.29

    1. [6] He maketh them also to skip like a calf; Lebanon and Sirion like a young unicorn.
    Pss.92

    1. [10] But my horn shalt thou exalt like the horn of an unicorn: I shall be anointed with fresh oil.
    Isa.34

    1. [7] And the unicorns shall come down with them, and the bullocks with the bulls; and their land shall be soaked with blood, and their dust made fat with fatness.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    WHY DOES THE BIBLE MENTION UNICORNS?

    If you look up the word “unicorn” in the Webster’s New World Dictionary, it says:
    Unicorn – A mythical horselike animal with a single horn growing from its forehead.

    This is what most of us think of when we hear the word “unicorn.” We think of a horse with a horn growing from its head. This is how unicorns are depicted in movies, cartoons, paintings, etc
    Now, this is not a real creature. This animal is totally fictitious. None of these are alive today and no scientist has ever found a fossil of one. However, unicorns are mentioned in the King James version of the Bible 9 times....
    ....Unicorns are not mentioned in any of the modern translations. Only in the King James version are they mentioned. Most of the modern translations say “wild ox.” Some translations even say “buffalo.”
    However, many Christian apologists are insistent that the King James Version is the most accurate of all the English translations. So because of this, some people, especially atheists, like to scoff at the Bible and make fun of it as a book of myths and fairy tales.
    However, it is important to understand that the definition of the word “unicorn” has changed over time.
    If you get an old 1828 Noah Webster’s Dictionary, which is the very first edition dictionary that Webster came out with about 200 years ago, and look up the word “unicorn” it says:
    Unicorn – An animal with one horn; the monoceros. this name is often applied to the rhinoceros.
    (This 1828 dictionary can be accessed free online. Just go to Google.com and type in “Noah Webster 1828” and it will be one of the first links that pop up.)
    Notice how this 200-year-old definition of the word “unicorn” says absolutely nothing about a horse. It says nothing about a horse-like animal, or a mythical animal, or a fictitious creature. It says absolutely nothing about mythology whatsoever. But rather, it says that this is a name that is often applied to the rhinoceros.
    Now, anyone who has ever seen a rhinoceros knows that a rhino has two horns — a larger one up front, and a smaller one behind. So, how could a rhinoceros be considered a unicorn?
    Well, if you look up the word “rhinoceros” in the same dictionary it says:
    Rhinoceros – A genus of quadrupeds of two species, one of which, the unicorn, has a single horn growing almost erect from the nose. This animal when full grown, is said to be 12 feet in length. There is another species with two horns, the bicornis. They are natives of Asia and Africa.
    According to Noah Webster, back in the early 1800’s it was understood that there were two species of the rhinoceros. The one-horned species was called “unicorn,” and the two-horned species was called “bicornis.”
    Today it is understood that there are five species of the rhinoceros, three of which have two horns, and two of which have one horn.
    ....cont...
    http://www.creationtoday.org/why-does-the-bible-mention-unicorns/

     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Why does the Bible mention the mythical unicorn?
    by Matt Slick

    In 1611, when the KJV was produced, the translators used the word "unicorn" to translate a single Hebrew word, רְאֵם reym, because they didn't know what the original Hebrew word meant. It is the English that critics complain about, not the original Hebrew text....
    In every occurrence of the English word "unicorn," it is the same Hebrew word ראם reym.
    • רְאֵם [râʾem, râʾeym, reym, rem /reh·ame/] n m. From 7213; TWOT 2096a; GK 8028; Nine occurrences; AV translates as “unicorn” nine times. 1probably the great aurochs or wild bulls which are now extinct. The exact meaning is not known. 1
    • reem or רְאֵים reem or רֵים rem or רֵם rem (910b); from 7213; a wild ox:—wild ox(7), wild oxen(2).2
    • 8028 רְאֵם (reʾēm): n.masc.; ≡ Str 7214; TWOT 2096a—1. LN 4.1–4.37(most versions) wild ox, aurochs, i.e., an extinct, long-horned, ancestor of the domestic cattle, Bos primigenius bojanus (Nu 23:22; 24:8; Dt 33:17;Job 39:9, 10; Ps 22:21[EB 21]; 92:11[EB 10]; Isa 34:7+), note: kjv, lxx, VULG. translate as a single-horned animal, such as rhinoceros or mysterious unicorn; 2. LN 4.1–4.37 unit: בֵּן רְאֵם (bēn reʾēm) adolescent wild ox, i.e., a non-domestic ox likely under two years old (Ps 29:6+) 3 .....
    • Unicorn — described as an animal of great ferocity and strength (Num. 23:22), R.V., “wild ox,” marg., “ox-antelope;” 24:8; Isa. 34:7, R.V., “wild oxen”), and untamable (Job 39:9). It was in reality a two-horned animal; but the exact reference of the word so rendered (reem) is doubtful. Some have supposed it to be the buffalo; others, the white antelope, called by the Arabs rim. Most probably, however, the word denotes the Bos primigenius (“primitive ox”), which is now extinct all over the world. This was the auerochs of the Germans, and the urus described by Caesar (Gal. Bel., vi.28) as inhabiting the Hercynian forest. The word thus rendered has been found in an Assyrian inscription written over the wild ox or bison, which some also suppose to be the animal intended (comp. Deut. 33:17; Ps. 22:21; 29:6; 92:10). 5
    The LXX - Septuagint

    The LXX (The Greek translation of the Old Testament done around 250 B.C.) says of Job 39:9, βουλήσεται δέ σοι μονόκερως δουλεῦσαι ἢ κοιμηθῆναι ἐπὶ φάτνης σου. The Greek word μονόκερως monokeros is what the Hebrews tranlsated the Hebrew word רְאֵם reym into. It is an unfortunate rendering. It literally means "one horn," and this is why the KJV rendered it as unicorn since it was using the LXX and not the original Hebrew here.
    ..... http://carm.org/bible-unicorn
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Unicorns, Satyrs, and the Bible

    by
    Bert Thompson, Ph.D.


    ......But what about the satyr? In Greek and Roman mythology, Satyr was a half-man/half-beast god and frequent companion of Bacchus, the Graeco-Roman religion’s god of fruitfulness and vegetation (known more popularly as the god of wine and ecstasy). In the Old Testament, the Hebrew word sa‘ir occurs some fifty-two times. It is related to the term se‘ar(hair), and generally means “a hairy one.” It is used, for example, to speak of the male goat that was employed as the Israelites’ solemn, collective sin offering on the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 16).

    In two cases, however, the King James Version renders sa‘ir as “satyr” (Isaiah 13:21 and 34:14). But the specific context of both passages makes it quite clear that the term is being used to refer to the wild goats that frequently inhabited the ruins of both ancient Babylon and Edom. On two different occasions in the KJV, the word is translated “demon” (Leviticus 17:7; 2 Chronicles 11:15), where it denotes a pagan god in goat form (cf. the New International Version). In regard to 2 Chronicles 11:15, respected Old Testament scholar J. Barton Payne wrote:

    Far from being mythological “satyrs,” as claimed by “liberal” criticism, the sirim appear to have been simply goat idols, used in conjunction with the golden calves (1969, p. 400).
    It is evident once again that the Bible does not lower itself to superstitious mythology. “Satyr” is merely a translation error, not a case of “mistaken identity” wherein a mythological creature was thought by the inspired writers to be a living, breathing animal.

    http://www.apologeticspress.org/apcontent.aspx?category=11&article=195

     
  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa,



    This is really some good material, thanks, I'll be back to digest it all sister cherryblossom.




     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Bible Dragons!

    ...In the King James Version of the Bible the Hebrew words that are translated most often as dragon/dragons was "tanniym/tanniyn". Fig 1 below details the places in the Scriptures where it occurs and how it is translated by the King James Version, the New King James Version and other varying translations given by various Bible versions.
    http://www.accuracyingenesis.com/dragon.html
    .....As you can see the more modern version of the Bible, the New King James Version, has most utilized jackals when the context indicates that a wild desert animal is indicated and this obviously makes sense considering the wild and desert environment of the Biblical area at the time. However, there are a number of other passages when obviously a sea animal is indicated and where the characteristics are such that a much larger and terrible animal are indicated. In those cases they used monster, sea creature or serpent. From reading Isaiah 27:1 it seems obvious that "tanniym/tanniyn" also includes the leviathan of Job 41, which is also mentioned in Psalms 74:14 and 104:26. We obviously conclude that it can also include the behemoth of Job 40:15.

    Leviathan, a mighty sea creature with scales and terrible teeth. Arrows, swords, stones and javelins cannot harm him and he regards iron as straw. A flame goes out of his mouth and smoke out of his nostrils. He makes the sea boil and leaves a shimmering wake. His heart is hard as stone and when he rises up the mighty become afraid. Sounds like the classic dragon from the dark ages, does it not? However, the crocodile is the most likely candidate, see Appendix B.

    Behemoth, he eats grass, his bones are like beams, his ribs like bars of iron, he has power and strength in his hips and stomach muscles. His tail like a cedar is one characteristic that has bothered many since some have proposed the hippopotamus which has a small elephant type tail. Some have proposed the crocodile which has a strong tail, but they are not known for eating grass. Therefore, some have proposed that the behemoth is unlike any animal now living. It must have been one of the animals now extinct? However, the hippopotamus is the most likely candidate, see Appendix B.

    But back to dragons, are they remaining ancestors of dinosaurs? Some have proposed so! And was the King James Version right in translating "tanniym/tanniyn" in some cases as dragon as many have proposed? We obviously are not going to resolve this argument here! But the following is just one example of a discovered "dragon" which received considerable publicity, but has naturally been dismissed by many scientists. Caught by Japanese fisherman off the coast of New Zealand at a depth of about 1000 feet. It was photographed and measured by the ship biologist. Weighing two tons and it was 30 feet in length. The trawler's captain ordered it thrown back into the sea for fear that it would contaminate his catch of fish. The Japanese government issued a stamp in commemoration of the event. For your consideration below are the photographs and sketch by the biologist.......continued....
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    COCKATRICE

    kok'-a-tris, kok'-a-tris (tsepha`; tsph`oni; Septuagint, basiliskos, "basilisk" (which see), and aspis, "asp" (see ADDER; ASP; SERPENT)): A fabulous, deadly, monster. The name "cockatrice" appears to be a corruption of Latin calcatrix, from calcare, "to tread," calcatrix being in turn a translation of the Greek ichneumon, from ichnos, "track" or "footstep." Herpestes ichneumon, the ichneumon, Pharaoh's rat, or mongoose, a weasel-like animal, is a native of northern Africa and southern Spain. There are also other species, including the Indian mongoose. It preys on rats and snakes, and does not despise poultry and eggs.
    Pliny (see Oxford Dictionary, under the word "Cockatrice") relates that the ichneumon darts down the open mouth of the crocodile, and destroys it by gnawing through its belly. In the course of time, as the story underwent changes, the animal was metamorphosed into a water snake, and was confused with the crocodile itself, and also with the basilisk. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th edition, the cockatrice was believed as late as the 17th century to be produced from a ****'s egg and hatched by a serpent, and "to possess the most deadly powers, plants withering at its touch, and men and animals being poisoned by its look. It stood in awe however of the ****, the sound of whose crowing killed it. .... The weasel alone among animals was unaffected by the glance of its evil eye, and attacked it at all times successfully; for when wounded by the monster's teeth it found a ready remedy in rue, the only plant which the cockatrice could not wither." The real ichneumon does kill the most deadly snakes, and has been supposed to resort to a vegetable antidote when bitten. It actually dies however when bitten by a deadly snake, and does not possess a knowledge of herbs, but its extraordinary agility enables it ordinarily to escape injury. It is interesting to see how the changing tale of this creature with its marvelous powers has made a hodge-podge of ichneumon, weasel, crocodile, and serpent.
    The Biblical references (the King James Version Isa 11:8; 59:5; Jer 8:17) are doubtless to a serpent, the word "cockatrice," with its medieval implications, having been introduced by the translators of the King James Version.
    See SERPENT.
    Alfred Ely Day
    http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/C/COCKATRICE/
     
  8. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Still coming back to this cherryblossom, just been busy keeping up with Politics. I can't wait to digest the information you've collected.


     
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