Black Entertainment : TUPAC'S "REVOLUTIONARY" MYTHS

Discussion in 'Black Entertainment' started by abstract219, May 15, 2006.

  1. abstract219

    abstract219 ...standing on the shoulders of giants MEMBER

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    oh boy...here we go again.....EVERY DAY...TUPAC WAS A "REVOLUTIONARY"...not hardly...maybe in the music biz...

    Tupac was a rapper...a entertainer. A good one, I agree. Not the best in the game in my opinion, but he was great.

    I just draw the line when people say he was a "revolutionary" and a "activist"....tell me, what revolutionary acts did he perform?
    1. Did he sponsor marches, did he open health clinics in black neighborhoods? No, he just sang about it.
    2. What grass roots organization did Tupac Shakur start? His mother now started one, but Pac never did.....
    3. Did he stand outside the schools, making sure black children got breakfast? No...he just sang about it.....
    4. Did he walk the streets of LA with a rifle, to ensure black people were not brutalized by the police? Absolutely not.....he just sang about it.

    He even said it himself..."I make records...People think this is my real life...I just make records."

    You get so tired of this same comment "he was a revolutionary/activist with Panther roots"....Yea, promoting "thug life"....degrading/raping black women....drug use.....tales of drug sales....threats of killing other black men....that aint hardly ''REVOLUTIONARY''

    I dont think the Panthers would want anything to do with Tupac. Folks, he was a entertainer, nothing more or less....I hardly think a REVOLUTIONARY would be "ridin or dyin" for some drug revenge scenario.....even dealing with a criminal like Shug Knight......or stomping another black man at a hotel lobby....which may have lead to his untimely death.

    Stokely Carmicheal, Assata Shakur (no relation) Malcom, Martin Luther King, Medgar Evans, Angela Davis, SNCC, the Panthers were REVOLUTIONARIES....People who died or suffered in the causes of black people. Not self-centered, millionaire recording artists.

    Tupac was a ENTERTAINER, concerned only with record sales. Nothing more, nothing less.....I aint got a problem with Tupac,,,excellent poet, great entertainer, but a revolutionary and activist, he was not....and I think this comment degrades and disrespects the true revolutionaries and activists in our communities who do the work, and even die out of the love of black people.

    I get so tired of these peeps tellin me "Tupac was a revolutionary-activist.."....I just didnt see it....
    These kids got to be clear and defined when they use those words (revolutionary, activists) around certain people.
     
  2. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You have to realize Pac was still a youth when he was first discovered. As he appraoched his mid-20's he may have began to see the world in a different light, namely WS. He also screamed M.O.B., yet it's also known he had a certain respect for women. Who knows only a die-hard fan or someone very close to him would've know him in depth:spinstar:

     
  3. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    One interesting thing about your post is that it associates a "revolutionary" with activists largely from the SIXTIES (60s) a few who were not actually "revolutionary" but "reformist". The other thing is you do not CLEARLY DEFINE what a "revolutionary" is. No mention of capitalism, imperialism or how any of the above mentioned fought against "white supremacy" (racism).

    All definitions of a "revolutionary" need to be looked at within their SPECIFIC historical and cultural context.

    Who can honestly deny that Tupac Shakur "revolutionized" hip hop INTERNATIONALLY within a specific historical and cultural context as the "Golden Age" of hip hop ended circa 1992?

    Particularly, Tupac's release "2Pacalypse Now" along with DaLenchMob's "Guerillas in Da Midst" and Ice Cube's "Death Certificate" and "Amerikkka's Most Wanted" contributed to the "G-Funk" transformation as "GUERILLA FUNK" which at the time of the 1992 South Central Los Angeles "Rebellion" was the MOST REVOLUTIONARY hip hop at that specific time period.

    To even attempt to deny this shows no true understanding of Hip Hop in particular its FIFTH ELEMENT "Knowledge" of which Tupac, along with Ice Cube and Paris took the "Spirit of the Panther" back to its WEST COAST ROOTS and from this time period the LEFT COAST dominated hip hop, LYRICALLY and CULTURALLY until Tupac's murder in 1996.

    To the youth who were exposed to and influenced by the work of Ice Cube, Paris, Tupac and the Hieroglyphics, just to name a few, this time period, is recognized by MOST HIP HOP "raptavist" as being a REVOLUTIONARY ERA.

    Of course we can even include Dr. Dre in this in particular listen closely to "The Chronic" lp and a song entitled "Ghetto Child".

    In conclusion, I would encourage you and anyone else, especially if you did not personally KNOW Pac or any of his family, including his God-Father Ji Jaga "Geronimo" Pratt consider contacting the following to see to what degree they agree with your sentiment.

    www.myspace.com/chairmanfredpart_2
    www.myspace.com/blockreportradio

    Furthermore, slated for release soon are recordings done by Tupac and his step-father Mutulu Shakur, a New Afrikan freedom fighter and political prisoner.

    The first link above is to brother Chairman Fred Hampton, Jr. of the P.O.C.C.
     
  4. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    "Who knows only a die-hard fan or someone very close to him would've know him in depth"

    Such as: Amanda Rushing...Janet Jackson...Jasmine Guy...Heather Hunter...Jada Pinkett-Smith...and many more.

    One of the criticisms of Pac was his relationships with "white women" and I know that does not sit well with a lot of Black folks. But even according to the biblical scriptures the wisest man King Solomon's greatest weakness was "strange women".

    I wonder how many of Pac's critics have thoroughly read "Inside A Thug's Heart" with original poems and letters of Tupac Shakur. I used to have a similar criticism of Pac but for different reasons. In the 80s I first met Pac when he was performing as a "stepper" with the New Afrikan Scouts, a dance troupe which performed at a "South African Solidarity Day" festival of which I was an organizer and media coordinator (UCLA, 1987). I KNOW his other God-Father, Watani Tyehimba, and personally knew Pac's God-Brother, Yakhisizwe, who committed suicide shortly after Pac's murder.

    Brothers Ji Jaga, Watani and Mutulu Shakur are three of the MOST REVOLUTIONRY Brothers still alive who survived the government's attacks on their families under the COINTELPRO operations. There is a lot more to Pac than any of his critics will ever know.

    Check the link below in my signature. Again, one will be surprised at how higly esteemed this Brother was and how deeply admired and HONORED that he is today, and whether folks like it or not, Tupac Shakur is an esteemed Elder and ANCESTOR to our Afrikan Youth who were born during his lifetime and since his death.
     
  5. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    mos def....

    Dang, where my shovel at? I can dig that:read:
     
  6. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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  7. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Fa sho, it's been dug mayne......:welldone:
     
  8. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Glad you dug it!...lol!

    this just shows how little these folks really know about "revolution"

    i take info from the panthers themselves...too bad i dont think i can drop some video clips in threads like this....

    such as pac in 1992 addressing the malcolm x grassroots movement....being introduced by the same brother watani who was pac's second "god-father"...the same new afrikan freedom fighter working with mutulu shakur in producing pac's forthcoming album which should be released this month...

    and up around ur way is pac's brother "candyman"....who also is about to drop...the got the same material pac was trying to leave "tha row" to do...in fact, some if the material he was doing with the outlawz before signing to tha row...

    folks dont realize that another brother from tha outlawz was the son of a new afrikan freedom fighter...

    the key right now is bringing together the different "factions" from
    la, the bay, chitown and atl....

    part of the network came together last year for black august 2005.....but imma wait and see how this "argument" is presented here before i drop more info on that....

    b.a.o.c.....black august organizing committee.....
     
  9. abstract219

    abstract219 ...standing on the shoulders of giants MEMBER

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    "Who can honestly deny that Tupac Shakur "revolutionized" hip hop INTERNATIONALLY within a specific historical and cultural context as the "Golden Age" of hip hop ended circa 1992?

    Particularly, Tupac's release "2Pacalypse Now" along with DaLenchMob's "Guerillas in Da Midst" and Ice Cube's "Death Certificate" and "Amerikkka's Most Wanted" contributed to the "G-Funk" transformation as "GUERILLA FUNK" which at the time of the 1992 South Central Los Angeles "Rebellion" was the MOST REVOLUTIONARY hip hop at that specific time period.

    To even attempt to deny this shows no true understanding of Hip Hop in particular its FIFTH ELEMENT "Knowledge" of which Tupac, along with Ice Cube and Paris took the "Spirit of the Panther" back to its WEST COAST ROOTS and from this time period the LEFT COAST dominated hip hop, LYRICALLY and CULTURALLY until Tupac's murder in 1996.-omowale



    omowale......in all due respect, brotha.....you are talking about records....recordings not direct street action......

    you are talking "cultural" revolutionary.....a revolutionary in what? Hip Hop. That's as about as far as I can go with it......He "revolutioninzed hip hop"....there was no social component, cause he was in it to make money. He opened not one day care or cultural center for the advancedment of black people in america. It seems some forget the more harsh and devilish lyrics Pac wrote, in effort to appoint him "Malcolm, Martin and Mandela" status post hoc.

    Tupac was nothing more than a entertainer, a cultural icon....."Spirit of the Panther...yes, but not the work of the "PaNTHER"....where I come from, we just say...."great entertainer"....

    it is insulting when you say "some people don't know what a revolutionary is"...or "they have no true knowledge of Hip hop".....just cause they dont agree with the Tupac myth?..........they might have a different definition than you...but you cant say cause someone "revolutionized HIP HOP" they were a true agent for change.

    now you can mention all the Panthers he knew...or were his uncles, or his mother's people...but that doesnt make Pac himself a "revolutionary"........tell me how did Pac fight against "capitalism and imperialism" besides making records talking about it??????.......i dont see the direct action component that defines "activist" there.....I can do that....i got the software....

    he sold records. he said it himself. he's in the business to sell records. and if you listen to some of the records, you would think he's in it to kill other black people.

    Paris, the Hieroglyphics, the Coup...that West Coast style....id give them more props...cause they didnt de-evolve into the disruptive, murderous aspects of Pac's Death Row period.
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Only one comment..

    Quote:

    "....there was no social component cause he was in it to make money."

    This is the one criticism of Tupac that I disagree with. Malcolm spoke of the need for "cultural" and "spiritual" revolution so this area is where I recognize the positive aspect of Pac's message even if others find no positive or redeeming value. But I can not agree there was "no social component". Not knowing Pac's roots. Not knowing his family. Not knowing that he was a lot more than an entertainer. Pac was part of the New Afrikan movement. He addressed the movement as a youth speaker. He was a VOICE for the New Afrikan Scouts. Furthermore, there is material soon to be released that he recorded with Mutulu Shakur or with his advisement.


    http://www.daretostruggle.org.
     
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