Trans-Saharan Trade and the West African Discovery of the Mediterranean

Discussion in 'Honoring Black Ancestors' started by I-khan, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. I-khan

    I-khan Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Originally published in M'hammad Sabour & Knut S. Vikør (eds), Ethnic Encounter and Culture Change. Papers from the Third Nordic Conference on Middle Eastern Studies, Bergen 1997: Nordic Research on the Middle East, vol. 3, pp. 116-142]

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    IMPORTANT NOTE: An unedited version of this paper can be found in the website of the Nordic Society for Middle Eastern Studies and in many other websites, too. However, students of African history should rather use this final version, as the unedited version does not include the essential footnotes. Following the good academic manners, I expect that those who wish to quote the contents of this paper or to create a hyperlink to this page, should introduce themselves: [email protected]


    THE PREHISTORY: TRANS-SAHARAN CONTACTS IN ANTIQUITY
    THE OPENING: WEST AFRICAN ENCOUNTER WITH THE ISLAMIC WORLD
    THE DISCOVERY: ARRIVAL OF THE WEST AFRICANS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN
    REFERENCES


    Sub-Saharan Africa is seldom considered as an independent subject in the context of world history. On the contrary, there is a strong tendency to emphasize the role of others, especially Europeans, in opening up the secrets of the ‘Dark Continent’ and integrating black Africa into the known world and history [1]. This view is well manifested, for instance, in Frank McLynn’s recent study of the nineteenth-century European exploration of Africa. In his preface, McLynn states: [2]

    «It is often objected by Africans that the very notion of European exploration and discovery of Africa is patronising. ‘There was nothing to discover, we were here all the time’, Dr Hastings Banda is said to have declared. But this is a somewhat specious view of exploration. Whatever their achievements, Africans knew nothing of the wider world and little of their own. Before the coming of the explorers, no one knew how the Zambezi watershed linked with the Congo or the Niger with the Nile. The exploration and discovery of Africa meant integrating the continent, for better or worse, into a general system of knowledge and a world system of economics..............


    http://www.uta.fi/~hipema/trans.htm
     
  2. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hmmmmm, that will require a closer look from me, brother I-Khan...

    Brother, why don't you participate in some of the discussions with the rest of us??? It will make it infinitely easier to connect with us who value this information your are bringing... How 'bout it, bruhman???(smile!)
     
  3. I-khan

    I-khan Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I am very busy,plus I am new to this whole thing.
     
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