Black History Culture : TRADITIONAL GOSPEL HARMONY MP3'S FOR FREE!

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Isaiah, Jan 11, 2006.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Now, this page also offers some gospel history, but I don't particularly like it's telling - whomever told it... It mixes CHRISTIAN singing with GOSPEL, which is a BLACK THANG, and not a one-phrase-fits-all phrase... More to come on that...


    http://www.dovesong.com/MP3/MP3_Harmonizing4.asp


    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    THE FATHER OF GOSPEL MUSIC EXPLAINS THE HISTORY IN AUDIO...

    In George T. Nieremberg’s 1983 documentary “Say Amen Somebody”, one of the reigning matriarch’s of Gospel singing Willa Mae Ford says of Thomas A. Dorsey, “He took the church music, spirituals and hymns and pepped them up and put a rhythm to them and called it ‘Gospel’. Before Mr. Dorsey they didn’t call me a Gospel singer. I was just a spiritual singer, a revival worker.”

    Gospel developed as a musical genre in America in the first half of the 20th century, when musicians began to infuse ‘church music’ with the rhythms of jazz and blues that were in the air. The first composer to successfully write and publish songs in the genre was Thomas A. Dorsey, who was born in Villa Rica, Georgia in 1899. After achieving considerable success as a blues piano player in the 1920s, Dorsey turned to writing and publishing sacred music. In 1930 he wrote, “Take My Hand, Precious Lord”, one of the most frequently recorded Gospel hymns in history. It was natural that Dorsey would interpret his sacred songs with the same jazz rhythm and blues feeling he had used successfully in his secular music. This powerful combination of sacred and secular styles created a revolution in music and Dorsey was at the heart of it.

    As an old man, Thomas A. Dorsey remarked on his life in music, “I worked in the circus for a while as a water boy, but I didn’t become caught up in show business until I started selling soda pop at the 81 Theatre (in Atlanta) — that’s where I heard people like Bessie Smith doing those blues numbers, and shaking everything they had.” It was the death of Dorsey’s wife and child in 1930 that made him turn away from his career as a bluesman to writing hymns. He said, “I was doing alright for myself but the voice of God whispered, ‘You need to change a little’.”

    Through the life story and musical legacy of Thomas A. Dorsey, we will explore the evolution of Gospel music in the 1930s, and the social context in which it developed. We will examine how Dorsey’s combination of jazz and blues with sacred music influenced the popularity of the genre, propelled the Gospel sound from churches into the marketplace, and created a new music industry. We will look at the impact that technology and economic success had on the genre and how it changed the music.

    We will track this new musical genre as it takes on a life of its own, attracts adherents and practitioners across the country, and gives rise to some of popular music's most enduring talents.



    http://www.honkytonks.org/showpages/tadorsey.htm

    PEACE!
    ISAIAH
     
  3. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    This remind me of this old song from slavery times called
    "Hush" somebody calling my name i have to look it back up
    and see who did this song and what year.

    Thankz for this insight on Traditional Gospel
     
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