Black History Culture : Today In Black History

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, May 30, 2009.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Today in Black History for May 30th


    1971 -Willie Mays scores his 1,950th run

    1965 - First Black student, Vivian Malone, graduated from
    First Black student, Vivian Malone, graduated from the University of Alabama.

    1956 - Bus boycott began in Tallahassee, Florida
    Bus boycott began in Tallahassee, Florida.

    1943 -Gale Sayers, youngest player ever to be elected to the Football Hall of Fame, born

    1903 - Countee Cullen
    Born in 1903 in New York City, Countee Cullen was raised in a Methodist parsonage. He attended De Witt Clinton High School in New York and began writing poetry at the age of fourteen. In 1922, Cullen entered New York University. His poems were published in The Crisis, under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, and Opportunity, a magazine of the National Urban League. He was soon after published in Harper's, the Century Magazine, and Poetry. He won several awards for his poem, "Ballad of the Brown Girl," and graduated from New York University in 1923. That same year, Harper published his first volume of verse, Color, and he was admitted to Harvard University where he completed a master's degree. His second volume of poetry, Copper Sun (1927), met with controversy in the black community because Cullen did not give the subject of race the same attention he had given it in Color. He was raised and educated in a primarily white community, and he differed from other poets of the Harlem Renaissance like Langston Hughes in that he lacked the background to comment from personal experience on the lives of other blacks or use popular black themes in his writing. An imaginative lyric poet, he wrote in the tradition of Keats and Shelley and was resistant to the new poetic techniques of the Modernists. He died in 1946.

    1854 - Kansas-Nebraska Act repealed Missouri Compromise
    Kansas-Nebraska Act repealed Missouri Compromise and opened Northern territory to slavery.

    1822 - House slave betrayed Denmark Vesey conspiracy
    House slave betrayed Denmark Vesey conspiracy. Vesey conspiracy, one of the most elaborate slave plots on record, involved thousands of Blacks in Charleston, S.C., and vicinity. Thirty-seven Blacks were hanged.


    http://www.blackfacts.com/
     
  2. baller

    baller Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I LIKE THIS...

    ...very interesting...and informative. KEEP IT UP.:)
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Today in Black History – May 31, 2009 *******



    1870 - The first civil rights Enforcement Act, which protects the

    voting and civil rights of African Americans, is passed by

    Congress. It provides stiff penalties for public officials

    and private citizens who deprive citizens of the suffrage

    and civil rights. The measure authorizes the use of the

    U.S. Army to protect these rights.



    1909 - The first NAACP conference is held at the United Charities

    Building in New York City with 300 African Americans and

    whites in attendance. Ida B. Wells-Barnett, while speaking

    at the conference, condemns lynching as a "blight upon our

    nation, mocking our laws and disgracing our Christianity."



    1917 - One of the first jazz records, "The Darktown Strutter's

    Ball," is released. It was written by songwriter and

    musician, Shelton Brooks. It will become Brooks' most

    famous song.



    1931 - Shirley Verrett is born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She will

    become an operatic mezzo-soprano known worldwide for her

    compelling performance in Carmen. She will be a star at the

    world’s great opera houses, including the Metropolitan

    Opera, La Scala, the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, the

    Bolshoi Opera, the Paris Opera, the San Francisco Opera, the

    Vienna Staatsoper, and the Lyric Opera of Chicago. She will

    appear at the Metropolitan opera for more than two decades.

    She will be the recipient of many honors and awards, among

    them the Marian Anderson Award, Naumburg Award, and the

    Sullivan Award; and fellowships from numerous foundations

    including Ford, John Hay Whitney, and Martha Baird

    Rockefeller. She will receive honorary doctorates from Holy

    Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, and Northeastern

    University in Boston. She will join the faculty at the

    University of Michigan in 1996, becoming the James Earl

    Jones Distinguished University Professor of Music.



    1955 - The U.S. Supreme Court passes a second desegregation ruling,

    demanding "all deliberate speed" be used in the

    desegregation of public schools.



    1961 - Judge Irving Kaufman orders the Board of Education of New

    Rochelle, New York to integrate their schools.



    1961 - Chuck Berry's amusement park, Berryland, opens near Saint

    Louis, Missouri.



    1979 - Zimbabwe proclaims its independence.



    1987 - John Dotson is named publisher of the Boulder, Colorado,

    "Daily Camera." It is one of many distinctions for the

    noted journalist, including being the first African

    American reporter for Newsweek magazine and founding, in

    the mid-1970's, the Institute for Journalism Education,

    dedicated to training minority journalists.



    1989 - Cito Gaston is named manager of the Toronto Blue Jays of

    baseball's American League.

    http://www.informationman.com/today.htm
     
  4. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    thank you sister as we capture our great feats in HISTORY
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    June 4, 1972:

    NY TIMES
    June 5, 1972
    Angela Davis Acquitted on All Charges
    By EARL CALDWELL

    San Jose, Calif,, June 4--"After just 13 hours of deliberations, an all-white jury found Angela Davis not guilty today of murder, kidnapping and criminal conspiracy charges.

    The jury returned its verdict at 12:35 P.M., clearing the 28-year-old black militant of all charges against her. The announcement touched off a demonstrations so emotional that Judge Richard E. Arnason threatened to clear the courtroom.

    Miss Davis, who had shown little emotion through the 13 weeks of the trial, broke into sobs after the last verdict had been read. "This is the happiest day of my life," she later exclaimed...." http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/03/08/home/davis-acquit.html


    ..."Californian Governor Ronald Reagan publicly vowed that Davis would never teach in that state again....During this period an international Free Angela Davis movement had grown, and Davis used the momentum to found the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression, which remains active today.

    Davis resumed teaching at San Francisco State University after the fiasco, and has subsequently lectured in all 50 US states, as well as internationally throughout Europe, Africa, the Carribean, Russia and the Pacific. Her acclaimed books exploring the institutionalisation of racial politics include If They Come In The Morning (1971), Angela Davis: An Autobiography (1974), Women, Race & Class (1981), Women, Race and Politics (1989), Blues Legacies & Black Feminism (1999) and The Angela Y Davis Reader (1999).

    Currently a member of the Advisory Board of the Prison Activist Resource Center, Davis now focuses on exposing racism that is endemic to the US prison system (which she calls the Punishment Industry in deference to unmonitored corporate cult-ure and increasingly totalitarian privatization schemes), and exploring new ways to de-construct oppression and race hatred. Controversy and her radical past still haunts her: in 1994 Republicans objected to her appointment to a presidential chair at University of California, Santa Cruz, where she is currently a professor in the History of Consciousness Department...." http://www.disinfo.com/archive/pages/dossier/id91/pg1/
     
  6. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    dropping good history knowledge
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Portia Washington Pittman

    PITTMAN, PORTIA MARSHALL WASHINGTON (1883-1978). Portia Washington Pittman, musician and teacher, was born in Tuskegee, Alabama, on June 6, 1883, the only daughter of Booker T. and Fanny (Smith) Washington. Her father was the founder of Tuskegee Institute. Upon her mother's death in 1884, Portia's care came from nursemaids and two stepmothers. Already a fairly accomplished pianist by the age of ten, she entertained her family by playing spirituals and simple classical pieces. Washington arranged for her to attend New England's finest boarding schools, including Framingham State Normal School in Massachusetts in 1895.

    After grammar school she returned home to take classes at Tuskegee Institute, and in 1901 she attended Wellesley College in Massachusetts. In New England she continued her piano studies and received a degree from the Bradford Academy (now Bradford Junior College) in 1905, the first black to obtain a degree from that institution. Upon graduation Portia traveled to Berlin to study under Martin Krause, master pianist and former student of Franz Liszt. Complicating her time in Europe, however, were the persistent attentions of William Sidney Pittman,qv a Tuskegee student and teacher she had met in 1900. Now, five years later, Pittman determined to marry Portia, and persuaded her through a passionate correspondence. Portia sacrificed her piano studies, returned to the United States, and married Sidney Pittman on Halloween, 1907, in the chapel of Tuskegee Institute.

    Pittman decided that he and Portia should begin afresh in Washington, D.C. There he set up an architectural practice and built their home in Fairmont Heights, Maryland. Between 1908 and 1912 Portia gave birth to her three children. Portia made her concert debut in a joint recital with Clarence Cameron White in May 1908 in Washington, and periodically toured on a concert circuit. Despite family happiness, money problems plagued the Pittmans. Sidney's architectural contracts dried up, and Portia began giving private piano lessons in order to maintain the family income. Pittman's vanity was wounded by his wife's having to work as well as by her family's fame. He moved the family in 1913 to Dallas, Texas, where he thought Booker T.

    Washington's shadow would be less oppressive. They settled on
    Juliette Street. After Pittman's contracts again dropped off, partly because
    Dallas blacks who could afford his services preferred to hire white architects,
    financial difficulties again plagued Portia's life. On November 14, 1915, her
    father died. A fire in 1918 destroyed the Pittmans' second Dallas home on
    Germania Street, and they moved to Liberty Street. Improvement in the family's fortunes began at this time, however, and continued for nearly ten years.

    Pittman became the president of the Brotherhood of Negro Building Mechanics of Texas, and Portia began teaching music at Booker T. Washington High School in 1925. She also chaired the education department of the Texas Association of Negro Musicians. In March 1927 the National Education Association held its annual convention in Dallas. Almost 7,500 teachers attended. A 600-voice choir from Booker T. Washington High School, under Portia's direction, sang a medley of popular and spiritual songs. It was the first time in history that a black high school group had appeared on the NEA program. Tremendous applause and cries of "encore" rose after the performance, and a spontaneous sing-along erupted as audience and choir together sang spirituals and folk songs. NEA president Randall J. Condon, a Los Angeles, California, principal, judged the performance a "complete success." Later that summer Portia traveled to Columbia University
    in order to acquire academic credentials to allow her to continue teaching in
    the Dallas public schools.

    In 1928 a violent quarrel between Pittman and his daughter, Fannie, culminated in his striking the girl. Portia packed, took Fannie, and left Pittman and Texas. She began teaching at Tuskegee that same year. Her classes included piano, public school music, glee club, and choir. Tuskegee had changed, however, since her father s death. The new administration demanded that all faculty members have academic degrees in order to teach. Lacking such credentials, Portia was removed from the faculty by 1939, but opened her own private music studio in her home in order to support herself. In 1944, at age sixtyone, she retired. She now dedicated herself to a campaign to have her father's Virginia birthplace preserved as a national monument.

    Before the success of that effort in May 1949, her efforts to memorialize her father bore fruit on May 23, 1946, when a bust of her father was installed in the Hall of Fame in New York, and also on August 7, 1946, when President Harry Truman signed a bill "authorizing the minting of five million Booker T. Washington commemorative fifty cent coins." She also oversaw the establishment of the Booker T. Washington Foundation to provide academic scholarships for black students. Though she had resolved to leave Texas behind her, she traveled to Dallas one last time to attend the funeral of her former husband, who died on February 19, 1958.

    Although Portia suffered financial and health problems during the last years of
    her life, she remained interested in the ongoing effort of black Americans to
    acquire their civil rights. She was heartened by the rediscovery of black
    history during the 1960s and the assurance that her father would be remembered as a great African-American leader. She died on February 26, 1978, in Washington, D.C.

    http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/PITTMAN/2001-03/0984110694
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    James Weldon Johnson June 17, 1871- June 26, 1938

    "Born in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1871, James Weldon Johnson’s life was defined by a number of firsts. Educated at Atlanta University, he was the first African American to pass the bar in Florida during his tenure as principal of Stanton Elementary School, his alma mater. He also was the first African American author to treat Harlem and Atlanta as subjects in fiction in his genre-crossing novel The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912). As a scholar of African American literature, Johnson edited The Book of American Negro Poetry (1922), the first anthology of African American poetry in English, and for decades a standard text in both English and African American Studies. A pioneering ethno-musicologist, Johnson and J. Rosamond Johnson, his brother and fellow composer, compiled and edited The Book of Negro Spirituals (1925), the first of a two-volume collection of Black sacred songs framed by a jointly authored introduction that traces the genesis and significance of one of the earliest Black art forms in the Americas. Johnson also was the first African American poet to adapt the voice of the Black folk preacher to verse. These poems are gathered in his masterful collection of folk sermons in verse entitled God’s Trombones (1927), one of three collections of verse by Johnson.

    A race man and an American with broad intellectual interests, Johnson also is the author of Black Manhattan (1930), a history of African American life and culture in New York, and Along This Way (1933), an autobiography. Johnson distinguished himself in civil rights, diplomacy, education, journalism, law, literature, and music. His many impressive achievements notwithstanding, his place in African American history and culture would be secure if he had composed only in 1900 with J. Rosamond Johnson “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” a hymn officially adopted by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and widely sung by African Americans as the Negro National Anthem.

    Admired for his able, judicious and creative approach to leadership in an era stained by virulent forms of racism, Johnson, fluent in Spanish and French, was the first African American to serve as the United States consul to Venezuela and Nicaragua. After his period of service in the consular corps, in 1915 Johnson joined the staff of the NAACP. Rising quickly through the leadership ranks, a year later he became the first African American to serve as field secretary and later as executive secretary of the NAACP. As executive secretary of the NAACP, Johnson organized in Manhattan the historic Silent March of 1917 (above) to protest the national crime of lynching. During his tenure as executive secretary of the NAACP, Johnson also led a national campaign against lynching that garnered significant congressional support in the form of the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill of 1921, a bill that would have made lynching a national crime, but it failed to become law because of insufficient votes in the Senate. Other significant achievements during Johnson’s tenure as head of the NAACP include the exposure of the brutality of the Marines during the United State’s occupation of Haiti, and the national campaign to support the Houston Martyrs: the soldiers of the 24th U.S. Infantry sentenced to death or life imprisonment for the 1917 uprising in Houston, Texas.

    After retiring from his position as head of the NAACP in 1930, Johnson joined the faculty of Fisk University as the Adam K. Spence Professor of Creative Writing. In 1934 he accepted an appointment as Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at New York University, thus becoming the university’s first African American faculty member. Johnson’s productive and multi-faceted life ended tragically when he was killed in an automobile accident in the summer of 1938 while vacationing in Maine...."

    http://www.jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/sub-james.htm
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    June 30, 1974

    Mrs. Alberta Williams King, mother of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, murdered by gunshot by Marcus Wayne Chenault at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, Ga.



    "...Mrs. Martin Luther King Sr., 69, wife of the pastor and mother of the slain civil rights leader, was playing (the organ). As the 500 worshipers bowed their heads for the Lord's Prayer, Marcus Wayne Chenault, 23, opened fire with two revolvers.

    "I'm tired of all this!" he screamed.

    "I'm taking over!" And he sprayed bullets wildly until both guns were empty.

    He wounded three people, two of them —Mrs. King and Deacon Edward Boykin, 69—fatally...."

    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,879375,00.html?promoid=googlep
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Bessie Head: (July 6, 1937 - April 17, 1986)

    [​IMG]

    Bessie Head 1937–-1986

    (Born Bessie Amelia Emery) South African-born Botswanan novelist, short story writer, and nonfiction writer.


    INTRODUCTION

    One of Africa's most renowned women writers, Head explored the effects of racial and social oppression and the theme of exile throughout her short fiction. In particular, Head's stories focus on the profound impact of racism on the people of South Africa. Head was of mixed race, and she experienced discrimination both in her birthplace, South Africa, and in her adopted land, Botswana. Her work casts a distinctly feminine perspective on the ills of societal injustice and the psychological costs of alienation.

    Biographical Information

    Head was born the daughter of an upper-class white woman and a black stableman. When her mother was found to be pregnant, she was committed to a mental hospital and deemed insane. Head was born in the asylum but was sent to live with foster parents; later, she was placed in the care of white missionaries. Her mother committed suicide when Head was still a girl. As a young adult, Head was trained as a teacher and taught elementary school for several years in South Africa. In 1961 Head married a journalist and shortly thereafter they divorced. At the age of twenty-seven she left for Botswana with her young son because, in her words, she could no longer tolerate apartheid in South Africa. Unfortunately, conditions in Botswana were not much better. For the next fifteen years she lived as a refugee at the Bamangwato Development Farm, combating poverty. Head published her first novel, When Rain Clouds Gather, in 1969. At the time of her death in 1986 from hepatitis, she was working on her autobiography.

    Major Works of Short Fiction

    Head's collection of short stories, The Collector of Treasures, and Other Botswana Village Tales (1977), investigates several aspects of African life, especially the social condition of its women. The tales are rooted in oral storytelling traditions and in village folklore, and much of the material is derived from interviews conducted by Head with the villagers of Serowe. By connecting past to present, the stories reveal the inevitable friction between old ways and new. The posthumously collected stories of Tales of Tenderness and Power (1989) have been praised for their insight into African history, culture, and the role of women. The collection demonstrates Head's development from early, anecdotal pieces to the work of a mature author. The Cardinals, with Meditations and Short Stories (1993) contains a novella and seven short pieces set in South Africa. The central novella concerns a woman called Mouse who was sold by her mother as a child. She grows up to be a newspaper reporter and becomes involved with a man who, unbeknownst to either of them, is her father....."

    http://www.enotes.com/short-story-criticism/head-bessie
     
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