Black Education / Schools : The stunning lack of diversity in America's school teachers

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by Liberty, Jun 24, 2016.

  1. Liberty

    Liberty going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    By 2024, students who are racial minorities will make up more than half of U.S. classrooms. But minority teachers, if hiring continues at its current pace, will make up only 20.5 percent of the educator workforce. Even 100 years from now, if trends persist, teachers and students in this country will not have comparable levels of diversity.


    This gloomy future was estimated based on recent data from the U.S. Department of Education report, "The State of Racial Diversity In the Educator Workforce."

    According to the report, the percentage of teachers of color in public elementary and secondary schools only grew five percentage points in 24 years; they were 13 percent of the workforce in 1988 and 18 percent in 2012. This translates into an annual growth rate of 0.2 percent.

    Read more

    http://theweek.com/articles/625156/stunning-lack-diversity-americas-school-teachers
     
  2. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Message received and understood!
     
  3. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Great topic!

    I'm biased though...I have many great teachers in my family and know how hard they work and how much they love their craft--teaching.

    At the same time, I'm extremely critical of the American educational system. I don't think that K-12 public school teachers are paid enough. Considering the amount of work, pressure and emotional problems/issues teachers have to deal with on a daily basis, teachers are underpaid. If we want to attract, retain, and motivate the best and the brightest, we need to raise the starting salaries of teachers to be competitive with other professions.

    I think "tenure"--a lifetime contract for teachers, should be done away with including faculty at the college level. Some will think that is sacrilegious for me to even suggest that, but I see how tenure can bias a system in favor of some over others and it typically works against AA faculty. Teachers should be evaluated in an equitable way and retained based on meritorious behavior. "Good" teachers will get rewarded and "bad" teachers will not. A formal and legal review should be made mandatory though prior to firing any teacher.

    The evaluation process for teachers should be made uniform nationally and not regulated by the state they work in.

    The current curriculum needs to be overhauled drastically to fit the educational needs of our modern and vastly diverse student population. America needs a curriculum that is more advanced in math and science and one that is interesting and will keep the attention of our youth. More business/economics courses taught in K-12 would also generate an early entrepreneurial spirit among students, which would have the potential of stimulating the economy.

    To be more globally and nationally competitive in the job market, compulsory education should start with preschool and the school year should be year round with a short summer break of maybe one or two weeks only.

    Public education should be free and should include electives i.e., artistic expression and physical education.

    Hiring and retention-- each school district should have a diversity plan whereby it becomes mandatory that teaching faculty be racially diverse.

    Classroom sizes should be smaller and this should be made mandatory. If more schools are needed due to the smaller class size, then sufficient funding should be available to expand the infrastructure.

    Now, this conversation should lead to discipline and issues of violence in our schools both on the part of teachers and students.

    How should we address the disorder in today's schools?
     
  4. Chaya Chaim

    Chaya Chaim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    And they'll still teach white washed HIS-STORY
     
  5. Al D

    Al D We become that which we repeatedly do.. PREMIUM MEMBER

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    My wife is a former teacher of 20 years in the NewYork educational system so I can definitely agree with you on all points sister. One major problem that most teachers face is the lack of parents involvement in the child's education. Most teachers as you have stated have a difficult time of teaching as it is without having to be parents also..
    Disorder comes from the lack of ability to discipline in school and at home...I say bring back corporal punishment in school and the household and keep government out of how a parent can discipline their child.. Let them raise them... This time out s--t and no belt spanking don't get it....Kids should only be allowed to call 911 if their parents are about to choke the h--l out of them..
    Otherwise, let them get that a--whipping......:skillet:
     
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  6. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    To some of your point, Bro. AI D . . .

    Parenting In the Black Community: Why Raising Children Is Different for Us

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    It’s no secret that Black and White parents often raise their children differently. White children are frequently allowed to “explore the world,” which is exhibited by running free in public places or expressing their displeasure with a decision a parent has made. Black children, on the other hand, are taught to accept the word of their parents above all else, and are often taught to be quiet and polite when in public.

    It’s also no surprise that the way a child is raised shapes the way he/she sees the world. Discipline and child-rearing (or lack thereof) also determines how the world sees a child. For example, many older Black parents and grandparents do their best to ensure that the children and grandchildren “behave” in public. This stems from a desire for Black children to be seen as non-threatening and civilized. So, in essence, part of the reason Black parents are so hard on their children is because they don’t want to perpetuate the Black stereotypes perpetuated by a racist society.

    In the study Parenting Styles African American and White Families with Children–Findings From an Observational Study, research reveals that male children are parented more harshly than female children. While some Black parents do this in an attempt to prepare their sons for the realities of white Supremacy, this style of parenting often sends the message that aggression and violence are acceptable forms of behavior.

    The American Sociological Association also published a 2002 study that indicates African American parents favor the disciplinarian or authoritarian approach to parenting. The study involved 302 African American adolescents and their mothers, and revealed that Black parents have more of a take-charge philosophy to parenting than their white, middle-class counterparts.The study states that Black parents may be more harsh on their children in an attempt to prepare them for a world that is filled with discrimination and societal biases that do not favor people of color.
     
  7. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I don't claim to fully understand or know how the required American curriculum is determined, including standardized testing but, I firmly believe that if the right pressure and demands are made by parents/citizens, first, on the U.S. Department of Education and second, our state and local school boards, third, organizations such as the NEA and teacher's unions, the content of today's curriculum can and should be changed.

    There is certainly more than sufficient scholarly-based material published today, from which an accurate and culturally diverse curriculum can be developed. No?

    "We" need to stop having low expectations and continue to battle a system that claims to be equitable and just when it's clearly not. If parents choose to or have little choice but to send their children/students to public schools for that "free" education, they should, at least, demand that what the students are taught especially in terms of national and world history, accurately reflect the truth versus the current lies.

    Parents have more power than, I think, they realize. They've been brainwashed by a dictatorial and biased system into thinking they lack power and must accept what is given to them. Pffft...hogwash!

    But, I can't place full responsibility on parents, particularly those that are working or spending most of their time trying to find work. It's tough trying to punch a time clock on your job and raise a family these days. Our communities are much different today and that difference puts more pressure on families than families 40 years ago that lived in smaller, more familiar communities. But, where there is a will, there's a way.

    Grassroots non-profit organizations designed to help improve education in the U.S. should be held accountable and be made to uphold their purpose and be expected to carry the lion's share of the effort while parents are busy working and trying to support their families. We have to stop accepting what others want to give us and start demanding higher quality goods and services. Hey, that's the American way, right?

    We should raise our expectations and push for what we want and not give up until we get it.
     
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  8. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    On point and on time!!
     
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