Black Money Business Jobs : The Stigma around Black Business and How to Break It

Latina Green

working for the economic liberation of our people
MEMBER
Mar 10, 2018
7
1
I have heard many complaints about black businesses, the vast majority coming from black people.

"They never open/close on time."

"Everything is too expensive."

"Nothing looks professional."

And such comments deter not only us, but other ethnicities from giving us business... but shouldn't we take a look at the root causes of these issues?

The vast majority, between 94-98%, of black businesses are one man or one woman operations, and less than 0.2% of black people work for other black people. So what does this tell us?

Almost every black business has a cap on its success, and it begins and ends with the fact that the owner has only 24 hours in a day, only so much knowledge, and only so much energy.

This leads to the stigma of black businesses having too high prices (one man operations usually lack of economy of scale, which is access to cheap plentiful production), not being professional (a business owner trying to be his own secretary will probably sacrifice polish), and having subpar customer service (one person can only handle so many customers and serve so many functions).

So let's talk solutions. It's not as easy as urging black entrepreneurs to hire others. If so someone would've hired me :) I am a black member of Corporate America, and the money is good but I want out. I want meaningful work. But in my job search, I found that there are all sorts of barriers that keep us from hiring each other.

So my question is: What can we do as a collective to create jobs for each other? What do black business owners need?
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
52,459
11,269
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author
I have heard many complaints about black businesses, the vast majority coming from black people.

"They never open/close on time."

"Everything is too expensive."

"Nothing looks professional."

And such comments deter not only us, but other ethnicities from giving us business... but shouldn't we take a look at the root causes of these issues?

The vast majority, between 94-98%, of black businesses are one man or one woman operations, and less than 0.2% of black people work for other black people. So what does this tell us?

Almost every black business has a cap on its success, and it begins and ends with the fact that the owner has only 24 hours in a day, only so much knowledge, and only so much energy.

This leads to the stigma of black businesses having too high prices (one man operations usually lack of economy of scale, which is access to cheap plentiful production), not being professional (a business owner trying to be his own secretary will probably sacrifice polish), and having subpar customer service (one person can only handle so many customers and serve so many functions).

So let's talk solutions. It's not as easy as urging black entrepreneurs to hire others. If so someone would've hired me :) I am a black member of Corporate America, and the money is good but I want out. I want meaningful work. But in my job search, I found that there are all sorts of barriers that keep us from hiring each other.

So my question is: What can we do as a collective to create jobs for each other? What do black business owners need?

To your question:

So my question is: What can we do as a collective to create jobs for each other? What do black business owners need?

Our situation is very complex and almost like building an airplane in the air. For example, the article below outlines a plethora of issues we must overcome, whether black workers or black business owners ...


To Fight Racial Inequality We Need To Rethink Our Economy


Lester Spence

HuffPost

... Consider these three facts, African-Americans in the U.S. are 6.4 times more likely than whites to be in jail, the black unemployment rate in the U.S. is consistently twice as high as white unemployment. An African-American person in the U.S. today can expect to die 3.5 years sooner than a white person.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/fight-racial-inequality-rethink-economy-171537111.html

A member of Occupy Wall Street protesting on 5th Avenue in October 2011. A new report has found racial inequality has worsened over the last 50 years


 

Latina Green

working for the economic liberation of our people
MEMBER
Mar 10, 2018
7
1
To your question:

So my question is: What can we do as a collective to create jobs for each other? What do black business owners need?

Our situation is very complex and almost like building an airplane in the air. For example, the article below outlines a plethora of issues we must overcome, whether black workers or black business owners ...


To Fight Racial Inequality We Need To Rethink Our Economy


Lester Spence

HuffPost

... Consider these three facts, African-Americans in the U.S. are 6.4 times more likely than whites to be in jail, the black unemployment rate in the U.S. is consistently twice as high as white unemployment. An African-American person in the U.S. today can expect to die 3.5 years sooner than a white person.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/fight-racial-inequality-rethink-economy-171537111.html

A member of Occupy Wall Street protesting on 5th Avenue in October 2011. A new report has found racial inequality has worsened over the last 50 years

I agree with everything in the article, which also points out a need to change the way of thinking amongst us as a priority. The article's mention of the disparity between the haves and have nots also points to the tendency of us not to a) hire each other and b) share with each other how we did it.

I'd like to take a break from talking problems, however, and talk solutions. What do we need to actually DO? What can those of us who aren't in jail and aren't unemployed do to help? What would it take to reach those of us with money and know how? What could our next steps be?
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
PREMIUM MEMBER
Nov 17, 2006
52,459
11,269
Occupation
Speaker/Teacher/Author
I agree with everything in the article, which also points out a need to change the way of thinking amongst us as a priority. The article's mention of the disparity between the haves and have nots also points to the tendency of us not to a) hire each other and b) share with each other how we did it.

I'd like to take a break from talking problems, however, and talk solutions. What do we need to actually DO? What can those of us who aren't in jail and aren't unemployed do to help? What would it take to reach those of us with money and know how? What could our next steps be?

Well, it would take a plan that encompasses the plight of Black America at its core. Something that most African Americans could embrace and do. Something like this ... BAMN

...
 

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