Black People : The Star-Spangled Banner: The Missing Verse

RAPTOR

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"....And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,

That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion

A home and a Country should leave us no more?

Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.

No refuge could save the hireling and slave

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,

And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave."


http://amhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/the-lyrics.aspx
 

KMeister

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That verse has to do with key's contempt for enslaved afrikans fighting on the side of the
british for their freedom.

Interesting key made that song/poem as an expression of liberty 'freedom', from
british rule.

The nerve of black folks wanting the fight for what he/america was fighting for...., freedom.
The verse is Key's declaration that neither hirelings (aka white mercenaries) nor slaves (black slaves promised their freedom if they joined the British) would be spared from being forced to flee or face death if they tried to defeat the USA.

Our national athem is actually a four-verse song. We virtually never sing the other three. (I've never heard alll four verses sung in my entire life.) So what?
 

RAPTOR

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The verse is Key's declaration that neither hirelings (aka white mercenaries) nor slaves (black slaves promised their freedom if they joined the British) would be spared from being forced to flee or face death if they tried to defeat the USA.

Our national athem is actually a four-verse song. We virtually never sing the other three. (I've never heard alll four verses sung in my entire life.) So what?
What you call "white mercanaries" are actually white folks who still had a sense of allegiance to england. (Don't care much about them either way)

The "So what?" part of your retort is spurious, if not condescending.
 

KMeister

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What you call "white mercanaries" are actually white folks who still had a sense of allegiance to england. (Don't care much about them either way)

The "So what?" part of your retort is spurious, if not condescending.
"Hireling" was a derogatory term for a mercenary, someone who fought for pay. They were not looked upon favorably.

I didn't mean to offend with the "so what" remark. My point is even if what this thread claims is true (and I don't see it): A literally never used verse of a song written by a white slave owner over 200 years ago, generations before slavery was abolished, reveals he didn't really care for blacks fighting for the enemy, I say...what's the significance?
 

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