Black People : The Plight of Black Professional Fishers in the Gulf

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Jun 2, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    At peak, hundreds of black fishers occupied this area, but their numbers have dwindled. Hurricane Katrina, which entered Louisiana through this region in 2005, retired many fishers early by destroying their boats and homes. Now, the question asked with dread is: Will the BP oil spill finish off what Katrina started: the vanishing of a proud, historic black fisher community?

    http://www.theroot.com/views/invisible-fishermen-oil-spill
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black Farmers rally to support likely BP oil spill victims

    Written by John W. Boyd, Jr | NBFA
    Tuesday, 25 May 2010 17:35

    The National Black Farmers Association (NBFA) has thrown its support behind the farming and fishing families living in the shadow of the worst oil spill in history in the Gulf of Mexico , association president John W. Boyd Jr. announced Tuesday.

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    “We are concerned about the livelihood of those who make their living on the land and in the coastal waters who are affected by the oil spill. We extend our prayers and well wishes to the affected families,” Boyd said in a statement announcing his plan to visit the affected areas in Louisiana and along the Gulf Coast .
    The NBFA is seeking to meet with British Petroleum (BP) officials to discuss the losses to black farmers and fishermen and others who often are hit hardest in such disasters. Boyd said those least prepared to sustain the income and property losses “must be compensated at the same levels as whites. We have finished last for too long when it comes to being compensated for our business and farm losses.”
    Boyd said his upcoming visit to the area will allow him to assess the damages and meet with affected individuals out of concern for the plight of those hardest hit and least prepared for recovery work. “I am seeing frightening images of poor people, blacks and whites, working on the clean up process without protective goggles, boots or clothing. This is unacceptable. This spill will have long term health and economic consequences among the residents and workers of affected areas of the Gulf Coast .

    http://www.orlandoadvocate.com/j15/...-rally-to-support-likely-bp-oil-spill-victims
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Nearly 5 Years After Katrina, African American Fishing Community in Louisiana’s Plaquemines Parish Faces New Struggle in Oil Spill Devastation and BP Obstruction
    Democracy Now!’s Anjali Kamat visits the town of Phoenix, Louisiana on the east bank of Plaquemines Parish, an area that was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. She speaks to Reverend Tyronne Edwards, a pastor and longtime community activist who spearheaded efforts to rebuild the largely African American fishing community after Katrina. In the aftermath of the BP oil spill disaster, Rev. Edwards is at the forefront of getting Washington, DC to pay attention to the needs of his community, whom he calls the "forgotten people" of Plaquemines Parish


    http://www.democracynow.org/2010/6/4/still_impacted_by_katrina_african_american
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Nearly 5 Years After Katrina, African American Fishing Community in Louisiana’s Plaquemines Parish Faces New Struggle in Oil Spill Devastation and BP Obstruction
    Democracy Now!’s Anjali Kamat visits the town of Phoenix, Louisiana on the east bank of Plaquemines Parish, an area that was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. She speaks to Reverend Tyronne Edwards, a pastor and longtime community activist who spearheaded efforts to rebuild the largely African American fishing community after Katrina. In the aftermath of the BP oil spill disaster, Rev. Edwards is at the forefront of getting Washington, DC to pay attention to the needs of his community, whom he calls the "forgotten people" of Plaquemines Parish


    http://www.democracynow.org/2010/6/4/still_impacted_by_katrina_african_american
     
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