Health and Wellness : The Malaria Outbreak

Discussion in 'Black Health and Wellness' started by UBNaturally, Oct 17, 2014.

  1. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Will go back and work our way to the present

    Government criticized as malaria deaths spike in Cameroon

    By CNN Staff

    Wed October 30, 2013

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    (CNN) -- Nearly 800 people have died in a recent malaria outbreak in northern Cameroon, one described by public health officials as "a severe and sudden epidemic."

    Doctors treating more than 12,000 victims of the disease say those who died in the past three weeks were mostly young children and pregnant women.

    Heavy rains have flooded the region around Maroua, giving mosquitoes ideal breeding conditions.

    "This is a severe and sudden epidemic. I see no end in sight," Dr. Amos Ekane, a malaria specialist treating more than 2,000 victims in Maroua, told CNN.

    According to the Public Health Ministry, more than 12,000 people are seriously ill and have been admitted to hospitals. But there are fewer than 10 treatment centers are available to help those who've contracted the mosquito-borne illness, and thousands of children and women are forced to sleep in the open or in overcrowded rooms without mosquito nets.

    "Three of my children have died here. Here is my wife lying helplessly with drips tied to this tree," Abubakar Ardo Miro told CNN, pointing out the conditions at the overcrowded Maroua regional hospital.

    Read more:
    http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/30/world/africa/cameroon-malaria-deaths


    Malaria in Liberia - 'The Struggle Continues'
    By Boakai Fofana

    April 25, 2013
    Monrovia — I woke up feeling the headache and chills, and made a couple of trips to the bathroom to ease the nausea. The experience was all too familiar; I was having another bout of malaria, even though that wasn't changing my day's routine. Growing up here, I have suffered more than a dozen times from the disease. A trip to the nearby clinic was going to be later in the day.

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    This is typical for many Liberians. The onset of high fever is almost certain to be a case of malaria. Even without a professional diagnosis, the sufferer will proceed to ingest available medications, usually an herb. According to the 2011 Liberia Malaria Indicator Survey, hospital records suggest that at least 33 percent of all in-patient deaths in Liberia and 41 percent of deaths among children under five are attributed to malaria. A lot of progress has been made over the years, but the numbers remain high.

    Monrovia is essentially built on swampy lands, and the population of the city has more than doubled since the end of the civil war. The lack of piped water and heavy rains from May to October make it a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Most Liberian households have at least one malaria sufferer at any given point, and mine's no exception.

    My experiences with the disease have ranged from mild to severe. Conventional home remedies like chloroquine, quinine and more recently, artesunate, usually heal the symptoms. But I have also experimented with the "Sekou Toure leaves", the popular herb used by low-income households. The leaves are picked from trees scattered across parts of Monrovia and cooked. One then drinks an unmeasured quantity of the water in which the leaves were boiled. The cooking takes away some of the bitterness. The efficacy of the herb is not a subject of debate here, even if the safety is.

    After my announcement to workmates (some of whom are not African) that I was having malaria symptoms, it created a buzz of conversation on Facebook. "OMG, does Boakai have malaria?" exclaimed one. "Yeah we get it all the time," responded another. I could tell they were looking out for me. But even more, it reflected our diversity: one regards the disease lightly, while others consider it almost as a death sentence.

    Read more:
    http://allafrica.com/stories/201304251421.html


    How Ebola is stealing attention from illnesses that kill more people

    September 5, 2014

    The Ebola virus has killed more than 2,100 people in four West African nations, and it has left the international community scrambling to contain it.

    But as deadly diseases go, Ebola isn't nearly as contagious as tuberculosis, which can be spread through the air. And it isn't as deadly as HIV/AIDS.

    It's no malaria, which in Liberia killed 1,725 people and sickened more than 1.4 million in 2012. Cholera was responsible for 1,146 deaths in Liberia in 2011.

    So far this year, during the worst Ebola outbreak in history, the virus has killed about 900 people in Liberia. That puts it on par with other deadly, yet preventable ailments.

    Diarrhea -- a preventable and treatable condition -- kills about 1.5 million children each year -- more than malaria, AIDS and measles combined, according to global health organizations.

    The H1N1 swine flu pandemic killed more than 284,000 people in 2009 and 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Yet Ebola's deadliness and the danger it poses to civil society in affected countries have made this epidemic a problem of global proportions: On Friday, the United Nations announced that it is establishing an "Ebola Crisis Center," with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon issuing an "international rescue call."


    Read more:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ttention-from-illnesses-that-kill-more-people


    Ebola outbreak shuts down malaria-control efforts

    Public-health experts fear that one epidemic may fuel another in West Africa.

    01 October 2014

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    Some Ebola control measures are causing local people to fear health-care workers.


    As the Ebola death toll spirals into the thousands in West Africa, the outbreak could have a spillover effect on the region’s deadliest disease. The outbreak has virtually shut down malaria control efforts in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, raising fears that cases of the mosquito-borne illness may start rising — if they haven’t already.


    Malaria killed more than 6,300 people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone in 2012, most of them young children. Overall, malaria deaths have fallen by about 30% in Africa since 2000 thanks to national programmes supported by international funding agencies such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the US Agency for International Development and the WHO’s Roll Back Malaria initiative.


    But the Ebola outbreak has brought those efforts to a standstill in the three affected countries. “Nobody is doing a thing,” says Thomas Teuscher, acting executive director of the Roll Back Malaria Partnership, based in Geneva, Switzerland.

    He says that malaria drugs are sitting in govern-ment warehouses, especially in Liberia and in Guinea, where medical supply trucks have been attacked by people angry with the government’s handling of the Ebola outbreak.


    Read more:
    http://www.nature.com/news/ebola-outbreak-shuts-down-malaria-control-efforts-1.16029


    From the CDC website:


    Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite. People with malaria often experience fever, chills, and flu-like illness. Left untreated, they may develop severe complications and die. In 2010 an estimated 219 million cases of malaria occurred worldwide and 660,000 people died, most (91%) in the African Region.

    http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/




    CDC: Ebola cases could reach at least 550,000 by January

    Tue September 23, 2014

    The range of estimated cases -- from 550,000 to 1.4 million -- is wide because experts suspect the current count is highly under-reported. The official death toll from Ebola in West Africa has climbed to more than 2,800 in six months, with 5,800 cases confirmed as of Monday, the World Health Organization said.

    But the CDC estimates that if 70% of people with Ebola are properly cared for in medical facilities, the epidemic could decrease and eventually end.

    In a press conference Tuesday, CDC Director Tom Frieden cautioned that this model is based on older data from August. The numbers are not projections, but "scenarios." The model does not take into account President Obama's announcement that the U.S. is sending troops and extra medical equipment to the area. Nor does it take into account the additional help from other countries promised.



    Is this signs of Malaria or Ebola or whatever?

    A malaria infection is generally characterized by recurrent attacks with the following signs and symptoms:

    • Moderate to severe shaking chills
    • High fever
    • Profuse sweating as body temperature falls
    Other signs and symptoms may include:

    • Headache
    • Vomiting
    • Diarrhea
    • General weakness and body aches.


    The issue here is the camera person filming this, and the "worker" driving the ambulance sitting in the front just waiting for them to help themselves out while the camera gets the money shots.

    Source:
    http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/23/world/africa/ebola-outbreak

    Malaria in Uganda


    Man gets Malaria after a visit to Gambia



    Ebola cases could soar to 10,000 a week; CDC: New team to help hospitals

    Tue October 14, 2014

    "Ebola is unfamiliar. It's scary," said Frieden. "And getting it right is really, really important, because the stakes are so high."

    Speaking to reporters in Switzerland, WHO Assistant Director-General Dr. Bruce Aylward told reporters that the Ebola outbreak could get worse before it gets better. By December, he said, there could be between 5,000 and 10,000 new cases weekly in West Africa.

    Source:
    http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/14/world/europe/ebola-outbreak/index.html

    I now wonder how some may be using the symptoms of Malaria to add to the numbers, while not discussing Malaria and essentially shoving it aside for "Ebola".

    Well, of course these experimental vaccines should bring this estimate down.
    Or how about an Ebola/Malaria zapping robot?

    Yes, a robot that kills Ebola/Malara, etc

    Watch the video below:
    http://www.bloomberg.com/video/popout/kZ5oVsrKRre8PlpQ6qBDCA/258.753
     
  2. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Challenges in Malaria Research

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    Organizing committee
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    Simon I Hay
    University of Oxford, UK

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    Marcel Hommel
    Editor-in-Chief, Malaria Journal, London, UK


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    Adrian Hill
    University of Oxford, UK

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    Peter G Kremsner
    Institut für Tropenmedizin, Tübingen, Germany

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    Dominic Kwiatkowski
    University of Oxford & MRC Centre for Genomics and Global Health, Oxford & Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK

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    Alan J Magill
    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle, USA

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    Richard Price
    Centre for Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, UK

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    David L Rollinson
    Natural History Museum, London, UK

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    David L Smith
    John Hopkins Malaria Research Institute (JHMRI), Baltimore, USA

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    Marcel Tanner
    Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland



    ______________________________________________________________



    Speakers
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    Achuyt Bhattarai
    US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA


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    Friedrich Frischknecht
    University of Heidelberg, Germany

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    Rosalind Howes
    University of Oxford, UK

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    Steven E Kern
    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle & University of Utah, USA

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    Sanjeev Krishna
    St George's, University of London, UK

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    Tovi Lehmann
    LMVR, NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Maryland, USA

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    Olivo Miotto
    University of Oxford, UK & Mahidol-Oxford Research Unit, Bangkok, Thailand

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    Bernhards Ogutu
    INDEPTH Network, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kenya

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    Photini Sinnis
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, USA

    See the complete overview here:
    http://www.challenges-in-malaria-research.com/2014/
     
  3. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Malaria vaccine: Hopes rise for 2015 target after successful trials
    Vaccine that nearly halved cases among children aged between five and seven months could save millions in worst-hit countries

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    October 8, 2013

    Sarah Boseley, health editor

    A vaccine against malaria could be introduced in the world's worst-hit countries in 2015, after the latest trial of a treatment produced by Britain's biggest drug company reduced the number of cases of the disease experienced by babies.

    The results of trials published on Tuesday in Durban, South Africa, showed that the RTS,S vaccine developed by GlaxoSmithKline nearly halved the cases of malaria experienced by children aged between five and seven months and cut the number of cases in babies aged 6 to 12 weeks by a quarter.

    The treatment's protection lasted for 18 months, although it waned slightly over time, and while that is not the sort of efficacy that parents in Europe or the US are used to getting in the vaccines given to their children, the malaria vaccine would make a significant difference to the outlook for those in areas where the tropical disease is rife.

    Every year, around 660,000 people die from malaria, most of them small children under the age of five. There are about 219m cases of the disease a year worldwide, and children who survive the serious illness can suffer damage to their health and development in their lifetime afterwards.

    Sir Andrew Witty, chief executive of GSK, said the company was very encouraged by the latest results and would now apply for a regulatory licence for its use in Africa under a special provision of the European Medicines Agency. "While we have seen some decline in vaccine efficacy over time, the sheer number of children affected by malaria means that the number of cases of the disease the vaccine can help prevent is impressive," he said.

    Duncan Learmouth, GSK's senior vice- president for developing countries and market access, said that if malaria were as serious a problem in the UK as it was in Africa, the company would be seeking a licence for this vaccine in spite of its limited efficacy.

    "I'm not sure it would be different if the impact of the disease was as it is in Africa. If we were looking at a disease in Europe and the US that had a similar clinical impact and burden on the health services, I actually think we would be pressing ahead for this," he said.

    Inventing a malaria vaccine has involved breaking new medical ground. This is the first-ever vaccine against a parasite, said Learmouth. There are other novel vaccines in development, such as one from the US that involves injecting patients with weakened parasites, but Learmouth insisted GSK was not rushing to get a licence because it feared competitors.

    "We're really not. I think the nearest vaccine is still in phase one – there is a huge long way to go. This is a very complex area. I don't expect a competitor vaccine for a very long time," he said.

    GSK says the vaccine will be not-for-profit – but it will add 5% to the cost price which will go towards further research and development work on tropical diseases. The pharmaceutical giant has spent $350m (£218m) on the vaccine so far and expects to invest $260m more before it reaches children. A team of 40 people will be needed to process the 1m pages of paperwork out of the many trials, which were held in seven Africa countries in different age groups. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation also put in about $200m.

    The dossier will go to the European Medical Agency next year and if it gets its licence, will go to the World Health Organisation for approval. It is expected that the donor-funded GAVI – the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation – will eventually pick up the bill for vaccine programmes as the treatment is deployed in malarial countries. Because the vaccine appears to be more effective in infants from five months of age, it may not be given at the same time as the basic immunisation for babies, such as diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus, but later, like measles and pneumococcal vaccine. The introduction of a booster jab, at 18 months, is now also being trialled to see if it can increase the duration of the vaccine's protection.

    The treatment was developed with the US-based non-profit PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative. David Kaslow, vice president, product development at PATH, said the limited efficacy of the vaccine must be put in context. There has been great progress with bed nets and other technical measures, "yet there is still a huge disease burden out there", he said. In that context, the vaccine has "a potentially significant public health impact". During the trials, he pointed out, there were 941 cases of malaria averted for every 1,000 children vaccinated.

    Dr Lucas Otieno of the Kenya Medical Research Institute-Walter Reed Project, who has been involved in the trials from 2005, cautioned that the good medical care that all participating children were given – they were seen by doctors as soon as any symptoms developed – may have prevented many malaria cases becoming serious. So it was possible, he cautioned, that the vaccine was more effective than appeared in the trials. However, Otieno added that there had been no shortage of volunteers for the trial from families for whom malaria was a permanent fear. "The volunteers were keen across all the sites," he said. "In my site, we had 1,631 children and we recruited the initial 1,000 within about three months, which was very impressive."


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    Ok, this is all and good.....

    These "Malaria Vaccines" will presumably coincide with the "Ebola Vaccines" scheduled for 2015.

    But now I have to question the viability and effectiveness of this product



    And if "It Works!", should we be looking at finding a natural mosquito repellant that "Works!" instead of injecting hundreds of thousands of children and mothers with who knows what?





    So if these off the shelf products that make claims to work, don't actually work, but nature already seems to supply the more effective solution...

    What do we gain from injecting foreign chemicals into the bloodstream?

    Let's see if we can effectively work together to avoid the exploitation when we have plenty of scientists among us.

    I believe these are Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)
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    Stay woke
     
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