Black Women : The 'lucky' world of black men

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by Zulile, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    100
    Occupation:
    HR/Finance
    Ratings:
    +103
    [​IMG]
    Dr. Malveaux is an economist, author and commentator, and the Founder & Thought Leader of Last Word Productions, Inc, a multimedia production company.

    http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2008/03/the-lucky-world.html

    By Julianne Malveaux

    Former Democratic vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro recently chose to try to drive a wedge among voters on the issue of race and gender.

    "If Obama was a white man, he would not be in this position," Ferraro, a supporter of Hillary Clinton, told a California newspaper. "And if he was a woman, he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is."

    With a woman and a black man vying for the first time for the Democratic presidential nomination this year, women of color are increasingly being asked whether they are voting their race or their gender — as if we could divide them. The truth is, race and gender are intertwined for black women, and both are determinants in their economic, social, political and educational status.

    The intersection of race and gender also has created a third burden for black women: the way the majority of society marginalizes black men. A stunning example of this third burden is evident in the labor market. In February, the white unemployment rate was 4.3%, while the black jobless rate was 8.3%. For those older than 20, 6.5% of African-American women were unemployed, compared with 7.9% of African-American men. The fact that black men take a greater economic hit than others in this economy is a burden to black women because we have futures that are intertwined.

    African-American women often are the mothers, daughters, sisters and wives of the African-American men who have extremely disparate outcomes in our society — more likely to be arrested, less likely to work, more likely to be marginalized, less likely to attend college. The status of African-American men affects the quality of life for African-American women.

    http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2008/03/the-lucky-world.html
     
  2. PLATINUMILLITY1

    PLATINUMILLITY1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    2,088
    Likes Received:
    38
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Full Time Student and Independant Buisness Owner
    Location:
    Life is waiting....
    Ratings:
    +38
    I know that ths is an information gaining thread Sis Zulile
    But I just have ONE thing to say..................................................



    White Unemployment and
    Black Jobless???????




    :qqb001:
    :sleepy:
    :bam: :bam: :bam: :bam: :bam: :bam:
    :em3000:
     
  3. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    31,989
    Likes Received:
    11,476
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired computer geek
    Location:
    north philly ghetto
    Ratings:
    +13,730
    black men are lucky because we have access to black women.:qqb023:
     
  4. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    100
    Occupation:
    HR/Finance
    Ratings:
    +103
    Touché, Platinumillity1 !!!

    smh...

     
  5. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    100
    Occupation:
    HR/Finance
    Ratings:
    +103
    This article seems to imply that it is the Black man who is partially responsible for holding the Black woman down.. I posted this in the Black Womens forum as I wondered if any Sistah felt similiar sentiments - if they battled race VERSUS (not and) gender issue.

    I recall brother oldsoul touching on this topic during a Black history month class - entitled 'rape'. I'll have to go back and listen to it again...
     
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    31,989
    Likes Received:
    11,476
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired computer geek
    Location:
    north philly ghetto
    Ratings:
    +13,730
    white supremacy holds us all down. no use arguing about the arrangement of the deck chairs on the titanic.
    gender is bs. black men and black women are one.
    we raise and fall together.
     
  7. Edward Williams

    Edward Williams Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    58
    Occupation:
    Produce Justice
    Location:
    Right here!
    Ratings:
    +58
    When the French (white people) wanted to take over Algeria (non-white people) this is what and how they did it according to historical record. They went to sociologists, psychyologists, and anthropologists and asked them how could they take over the people of Algeria without firing a single shot. They were told if you can take one cultural thread and pull that thread until it unravels that they could take over Algeria while keeping the people and their wealth intact.

    They (white people) were advised to go to the wearing of the veil. These white people were advised by other white people to talk about the women wearing the veils, ridicule them, make fun of them publicly, under the guise of women's liberation, and see if you can get those women ot take those veils off. They were told that if you can get those women to take their veils off you would have disrupted the relationship between the man and the women. Once you begin to divide them you will weaken their bond and by doing so weaken their focus. They did so and took over Algeria.

    You would think we would have learned by now having had the same strategy pulled on us in the so-called "Women's Liberation Movement".

    If you do not understand racism (white supremacy) what it is and how it works everything else that you understand will only confuse you. Why? Because you will not understand the parameters in which it is occurring. The words will become more important than what you're seeing. You'll be looking right at it happening and calling it something else. Because the words that are already in your mind that describe what you are looking at.

    Algeria? Womens Liberation Movement? And here we are again falling for the same thing? And we call ourselves smart?

    The only reason to study the past is to understand what mistakes not to make again. If you don't understand the past you are doomed to repeat it.

    Male/Female or Race? How to vote?

    Here we go...
     
  8. Jaisolovely

    Jaisolovely Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Messages:
    479
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Beyond my own understanding
    Ratings:
    +3
    In that case we should support each other, especially our Black Men.
    Vote Obama!!
     
Loading...