Destee Network : the Ifa Foundation of North America

Discussion in 'Destee Network :' started by AHMOSE, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. AHMOSE

    AHMOSE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is the home page of the Ifa Foundation of North America.

    The world’s most complete Web Site with more free information on Orisa worship than anywhere else in order to combat the intellectual and emotional slavery that secrecy and lack of knowledge creates.

    For more information view the website:http://www.ifafoundation.org/index.asp
     
  2. Awotunde

    Awotunde Active Member MEMBER

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    Information

    Most of the information on Ifa Foundation of North America is incorrect. Besides that Ifa is an Afrikan Ancestral tradition and from that perspective no person of European descent cannot pass this tradition on to Afrikan (Black) people nor anyone else for that matter. They cannot pass on what they can NEVER possess.

    Please visit New Afrikan Vodun at:

    http://newafrikanvodun.com/index2.html

    I can be reached at [email protected]
     
  3. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Awotunde, you are correct. The Ifa Foundation is a sham. However, I'm not clear on what you mean when you say the religion can only be "passed on" or taught by Africans. After all, Pierre Verger was a white man, and I doubt anyone would deny his being a devoted adept. Maybe you could clear up my confusion.
    Back to the Ifa Foundation, who shamelessly advertise on this site. They prey on disillusioned practitioners of our religion. Due to the many corrupt "godparents" both in the U.S. and in Lucumi, etc. there are plenty of people who are without guidance, who stumble upon the Ifa Foundation, which promises "no more fear, no more secrets" and portray themselves as selfless humanitarians, who, like Tarzan, are better Africans than Africans themselves. Left to there own devices (they have no connection to any egbe or elders) they make things up as they go along. Those who are sucked in jump from the frying pan into the fire. The Ifa Foundation is about one thing and one thing only - getting in your wallet. They will give you a 45 minute initiation - no drumming, no chanting - hell, you can even be an Oluwo before you have even memorized the order of the first 16 Odu.
    They are pure marketing, and have done well. I wouldn't say they have engaged in cultural appropriation, because they really don't know anything about the culture in question. They live in a big house, in an exclusive (all white) neighborhood, drive fancy cars and take wonderful vacations all over the world. Telling that they never consider a trip to Africa. Anyways, people need to know that what they are doing is NOT Yoruba religion, but some contrived bull****.
     
  4. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Awo Dino ... thank you so much for joining us and sharing!

    While I don't know anything about the organization you speak of above, or enough about Ifa to speak about, what you present has become a concern of mine lately.

    Not just with Ifa, but with any of the Spiritual / Religious paths that have become (re) known to us of late. It seems we are so eager to learn anything, become involved in anything, that is not Christianity, that we put our whole selves at risk. Willing to take the word of anyone that speaks the jargon, when we have no idea if they have our best interest at heart. It's really frightening to me, as over the years, I've seen Members right here complain of all kinds of negative experiences, after the fact.

    I even started this thread, Responsible Entrance into the Occult, in an effort to protect and guide those yearning for information.

    Thank You for joining us and sharing.

    Much Love and Peace.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  5. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks, Destee for your kind words.
    This isn't a new problem, of course. Religions are always a part of the culture that produces them. We are a long ways from Yorubaland. Many have gone to Africa for initiation, which is a wonderful experience, but then what? So it is difficult to be an adept in the Diaspora. Because of the nature of our ritual, money can be made in its commodification. Herein lies the source of so many charlatans.
    Another problem lies within ourselves as Americans. You don't have to be initiated to worship. Yet, everyone wants to be initiated as a status symbol of sorts, and there are plenty of people who will gladly take your money. Initiation will not fix your life. It will only provide you the courage to make the changes within yourself that need to be made. Your ancestors are your best defense, and you don't need an initiation, or to spend a lot of money, to put together an ancestral shrine and connect with them.
    If you feel drawn to the Orisa, where do you go? Wherever you end up, look at that person and analize their character - the central tenet of our religion is iwa pele - good character. I know that Chief Fama - ileorunmila.com - is of good character. she has written books. Awo Falokun - awostudycenter.com - is of good character. He has also written several books. However, books will only get you so far. You have to find a "house" or "godparents" who can teach you. So, back to square one. Also, there are variations in the Diaspora. Cuban Santeria, rejected by most African-Americans because of its mixing with Catholiscism; Lucumi, also Cuban but without the saints; Brazilian Candomble, which is closer to the traditional (some would say even more traditional) Yoruba; Haitian Vodun (In Cuba there are also "paleros" which is not Yoruba but Congo-Algerian. Same in Haiti); Puerto Rican style, which is more focused on ancestor worship, and of course, There are Iles - "Houses" here in the U.S. founded by African-Americans - Oyotunji village in South Carolina for instance.
    If you are drawn to the Orisa, you should first of all get a reading done by a reputable santera, iyanifa or babalawo. You could get in touch with one of the folks mentioned above, and maybe they can hook you up with someone in your area. Or, ask around, investigate, and surely there is someone of good character in your area who can do a reading.
    You will find a much more believable, beautiful, and complex theology than the silly, shallow nonsense that Christianity has been reduced to at the hands of the European. If you are drawn to Christianity, then at least go to its root - Ethiopia, and find the truth. Ase.

    "Character is Destiny. Destiny is Character"
     
  6. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Awo Dino ... Peace and Blessings,

    Thank you for the above. I've taken the liberty to make the URLs you shared live, as I find this to be a very important topic. Our people really seem to be searching for this very thing, and those found to be reputable, should be brought to the forefront.

    You mention something that I hold so close to my own heart, and have mentioned a few times here, over the years. We have had all kinds of people joining us, boasting of their great knowledge in this or that, yet treating everyone as if they are dirt beneath their feet. It does something to my Spirit to see this. And you know what else, those people that do that, are often held in the highest esteem, by the very ones they look down upon and mistreat. It is the most amazing phenomena to witness. If I didn't see it for my own self, I'd probably not believe it. I've seen Members almost held hostage, yearning for a word or two from one that calls themselves enlightened, as their very own words and actions testify otherwise. It's really scarey because it shows how hungry our people are, how willing they are to cast caution to the wind, for what they think is knowledge from on high.

    I mentioned in Brother MetaScience's thread, Speaking in Tongue, about the fact that I use to belong to a Holiness Church ... Church of God, House of Deliverance - Mother Janie Lee Williams, Pastor ... who is an Ancestor herself now.

    Well, that could never have happened if it were not for a most beautiful Sister, oh my gosh ... i wanna say her name, but she's not here, and might wanna choke me if she ever saw this ... but ... the truth is the truth ... this Sister ... Deborah Hines ... oh my gosh ... talk about a Saint ... it wasn't the holiness church, or the things they taught, or how they interpreted the Bible, that drew me in ... no no no ... it was her. She was so humble, so pure, so honest, so true, so righteous, so loving, so forgiving, so kind, so giving, so patient, so much like God, that it would not have mattered what she believed ... i would have followed her. I did follow her.

    But nowadays, it seems that folk only have to talk the talk, and no walking is required. They don't have to demonstrate the wisdom, love, long-suffering, none of that, just talk the talk, point out the wrong in others, and they are the most enlightened ... but that's not how it works for me. I am not impressed with such, and really feel kinda sorry for those who are.

    Awo Dino ... you have shared a lot in the above post, encouraging many to move carefully along whatever path they've chosen ... thanks so much.

    We talk a lot about Christianity here, and your comment, the root of it being in Ethiopia is very interesting. Can you tell us more?

    Awo Dino ... last but not least, are you a Brother or Sister? I just like addressing us accordingly, if you don't mind sharing.

    Much Love and Peace.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  7. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hi Destee,
    I am a Puerto Rican Brother. Am I "black?" I don't know. Am I "white?" don't know that either. Like most Puerto Ricans on the mainland, I identify with African-Americans. They are the ones who learned us on the harsh realities of life in America. Anyways, I am no expert, or authority on anything. I think if you want info on the African roots of the Judeo-Christian tradition, you can find it in a good library. The rastas, although perhaps misguided in some ways, were on the right trail - the Ethiopian Coptic Church. It is from Rasta brothers in Brooklyn that I learned a little about this history. I think a thread on African spirituality would be cool to keep this conversation alive. What do you say?
    Awotunde brings up an interesting conversation. I went to his link. He proposes a tying of black nationalism to African spirituality. I agree that whitey can't be trusted, or even deserves to be enlightened, but I bristle at tying spirituality to something so human (emotions based) as nationalism.
    Of course this is nothing new. It has been a part of Black Liberation Theology. I propose we move beyond nationalism and embrace our rich spiritual heritage - our ancestors (or should I say yours, 'cause mine are from all over the place) for the sake of spiritual elevation. This is my opinion, and I think a wider discussion of this and other spiritual issues would be great.

    Alaafia
    (peace)
     
  8. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    forget about the new thread, sister. I just saw that there already are many on the subject. I'll go stir up trouble on one of those. see you there!
     
  9. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother Awo Dino ... if you don't know if you're Black or White, neither do I, and that part doesn't really matter to me. I guess we could ask the white folk that created the race categorizations, if we really wanted to know. :)

    Puerto Rican you say? Okay. That is so kewl. I have a confession to make, oh my gosh, it was so funny to me when I found myself thinking like this ... funny and sad a little I think ... but I'm gonna confess it anyway ... here goes ... :eeek:

    When I read that you were Puerto Rican, I immediately thought of the one Brother that I've met out here on the Internet, that told me he was Puerto Rican ... who I happen to love and respect dearly ... and well, when I thought of him, I immediately thought to ask you ... do you know him ... :lol:

    Oh gosh ... that is so funny and sad ... :look:

    Sad because I can imagine others doing the same, thinking that we all know each other. Like if a white person knows one Black person, then they meet another, and ask them ... Ohhhh, I know another Black Person named Destee, do you know her too?!! What da hizzle?!! :lol:

    Oh gosh ... anyway ... you may know of this Brother though, his name is Puerto Rocco ... :love: ... and he useta manage an MSN Group called Boricua Brave Gods and Goddess. I say useta, cause I was gonna share a link to what was a very active community, but it seems the link doesn't work anymore. Looks like MSN closed all of their groups. I don't really know. But anyway, I'm sure Brother Puerto Rocco is still out here doin his thang, somewhere on this Internet. In fact, he's the only man that I've ever said "Yes Pappi" to ... :lol: ... oh gosh! :blush: ... he taught me how to say it properly, holding my hand, looking into my eyes, hypnotizing me, everything! :blush:

    He's not been around in a minute, but do you know him (like there are only 2 Puerto Rican Brothers online, and surely yall have met)?

    Anywho .. thanks for sharing with me, and allowing me to give a glimpse of just how silly I can be.

    Oh, and I do see you in other threads, and will join in as time and stuff allow.

    Much Love and Peace.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  10. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hi destee,
    You can be a little silly! That is so wonderful. It is hard to find people who can be deep thinkers but are also able to have fun. These are the kind of people i like to be around. We shouldn't take ourselves to seriously.
    No, I don't know Puerto Rocco. But he must be a bad mofo if he got you to sing "yes papi!" lol. I can't believe you've only met one PR brotha? Girl, you need to get out more! anyways, I like your site, it's got more info than a person could possibly ingest, and you aren't like the "Central Scrutinizer" or anything, which is cool. Congrats, and keep sharing of your beautiful feminine Ase with all of us.

    peace
     
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