Black Spirituality Religion : The Holy Qur'an...

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Aqil, Sep 17, 2001.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Of all the holy books revealed to different prophets for the guidance of mankind, the Holy Qur’an occupies a unique position in the sense that it is meant for all times and climes until the end of the world – because it is the last word of Allah (God), after which no revealed book is to come...

    Islam is a perfect religion, so it touches every aspect of human activity. Therefore, the Holy Qur’an contains a complete code of life which may be required by man at any time and in any place...

    The Qur’an is not a book containing theories, but it is the book which always exhorts mankind to practice and action. It always extends an invitation to think, to ponder and to contemplate over the mysteries of the Universe. It is the book not only to recite, but to understand and apply the instructions in one’s own life. The Qur’an contains revolutionary ideas so that a man lying in the deep, dark dungeons of degradation can come up and soar high to reach the zenith of greatness and glory...

    The Qur’an contains such knowledge and enlightenment that it shall never be ineffective, futile, or fruitless. It carries in its word wisdom so deep that an ordinary man cannot actually reach those depths. It is a highway that will not mislead anybody. It is a light that will never die out. It creates such distinction between truth and falsehood that its decisions will never be challenged or refuted...

    Its exhortations cannot be proven wrong. It is the cure for perverse minds. It is a power that cannot be overthrown. It is truth personified. Its supporters will never feel sorry for the support given to it. It is a mine of faith, a spring of knowledge, and a fountainhead of equity and justice...

    The wisdom that the Holy Qur’an contains and the learning it imparts cannot be exhausted. It is such a destination that those who aim to reach it will never go astray. It is such a landmark that those who follow the path of truth will never miss it. It is such a sublime source of information that nothing can surpass it. God has made it a blessing for the learned, wise and pious persons, an unfailing remedy for the wicked, and a source of illumination for those in the depths of darkness...

    It is a powerful binding force to keep men within the bonds of truth, faith and love. It is the safest refuge from sin and vice. It is the harbinger of peace for humanity. It honors those who accept it, guides those who follow it, profits those who act according to its dictates...and it acts as a sound argument for those who speak through it...

    The Qur'an brings success to those who embrace it. It is the quickest and shortest way to salvation for those who formulate their lives according to its tenets. It is the easiest and best form of explanation for those who want to understand the principles of truth and piety. So far as the history of mankind is concerned, it is the best source of information; and so far as justice and equity is concerned, it is the best code of law...

    “Thou receivest the Qur’an from One All-wise, All-knowing.” (Surah 27:6)
     
  2. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thus the Holy Qur'an is not a "canonized" book...
     
  3. jusme

    jusme Active Member MEMBER

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    The Holy Qu'raan is indeed a great example of truth and the Prophet Mohammed (pbuh) a great example for mankind. There is no other book comparible to it. It is the only one of its kind. I appreciate the fact that it confirms that the Bible and Torah are from God, and that much of them both have true significgance. But as repentance does away with sin the Qu'ran did away with them both. They had been misunderstood by some and perverted by others, they are no longer accurate.
     
  4. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You're right, jusme...and thank you for your enlightening comments...

    As-Salaamu-Alaikum.
     
  5. j'hiah

    j'hiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    the Holy Qu'ran acknowledges Jesus as being perfect. NO sin.
    Not even prophet Muhammad was w/o sin.

    Aqil, what would you use to take away the streaks and stains for your car a dirty towel or a clean one??
     
  6. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't have a car, Jehiah. The following article mirrors my thoughts on your comment re: Jesus...

    No Offense, But Muslims Love Jesus As Much As Christians Do...

    By John Casey

    Some years ago an agnostic friend of mine married a Jewish woman who practiced her faith seriously. He took instruction in Judaism and seemed quite likely to convert - but eventually did not. His chief reason was that he remained agnostic. But there was another obstacle that surprised even himself: "I found that I just did not want to give up Jesus."

    In European culture, there is no getting away from Jesus even if you are agnostic. True, Nietzsche tried to reject him with detestation and contempt, calling him an "idiot"; a purveyor of a sick, decadent view of the world. Nietzsche thought that the only figure in the New Testament who commands respect is Pontius Pilate. Yet the very ferocity of Nietzsche's onslaught on Jesus showed how strong in his heart was the image he wanted to destroy.

    Now what if my friend had married a Muslim? The interesting thing is that he could have kept Jesus - not the Jesus who was the Son of God, admittedly, and who was crucified, but certainly the Jesus who was Messiah and miracle worker, who conversed regularly with God - who was born of a virgin and who ascended into heaven.

    Jesus is referred to quite often in the Qur'an (Muslim holy book) six times under the title "Messiah." Yet I had long-supposed that the importance of Jesus as prophet in Muslim tradition was not much more than a matter of lip-service, something to which Muslims gave (to use Cardinal Newman's distinction) "notional" rather than "real" assent.

    This impression was strengthened when I went to Ur of the Chaldees in southern Iraq and visited the so-called house of Abraham. It is only a few piles of sun-baked mud bricks, but you would have expected hundreds of Muslim Arabs to be visiting the birthplace of their Patriarch. I saw none - whereas the shrines of Muslim martyrs in Najaf and Kerbala were thronged. I assumed, therefore, that Jesus must be a marginal figure in the Muslim world.

    How wrong this assumption was I have learned by reading a fascinating and instructive book, The Muslim Jesus, by the Cambridge academic Tarif Khalidi. Professor Khalidi has brought together, from a vast range of sources, most of the stories, sayings and traditions of Jesus that are to be found in Muslim piety from the earliest times.

    The Muslim Jesus is an ascetic, a man of voluntary poverty, humility and long-suffering. He literally turns the other cheek, allowing his face to be slapped twice in order to protect two of his disciples. He teaches the return of good for evil:

    "Jesus used to say, 'Charity does not mean doing good to him who does good to you...Charity means that you should do good to him who does you harm.' "

    He loves the poor and embraces poverty:

    "The day Jesus was raised to Heaven, he left behind nothing but a woolen garment, a slingshot and two sandals."

    He preaches against attachment to worldly things:

    "Jesus said, 'He who seeks worldly things is like the man who drinks sea water: the more he drinks, the more thirsty he becomes, until it kills him.'"

    Many of the sayings of the Muslim Jesus are clearly derived from Biblical sources:

    "Place your treasures in Heaven, for the heart of man is where his treasure is"; "Look at the birds coming and going! They neither reap nor plough, and God provides for them."

    Sometimes there is a sort of gloss on the words of Jesus from the Gospel:

    "Oh disciples, do not cast pearls before swine, for the swine can do nothing with them...wisdom is more precious than pearls and whomever rejects wisdom is worse than a swine."

    He is certainly a wonder-worker. He often raises the dead, and gives his disciples power to do the same. More than once he comes across a skull and restores it to life; on one occasion granting salvation to a person who had been damned. The skulls, like everyone else in these stories, address Jesus as "Spirit of God." Once he is even addressed as "Word of God."

    I once had a conversation with members of Hizbollah in Beirut. One of them said this: "The greatness of Islam is that we combine Judaism and Christianity. Jesus freed enslaved hearts; he was able to release human feeling; to reveal a kingdom of peace. Jesus's realm was the realm of the soul. Jesus is soul; Moses is mind - the mind of the legislator. In Islam, we interweave both."

    This is certainly the Jesus of these stories - the Jesus of the mystical Sufi tradition. The great Muslim philosopher Al-Ghazali actually called Jesus "Prophet of the Heart."

    The Muslim Jesus is not divine, but a humble servant of God. He was not crucified - Islam insists that the story of the killing of Jesus is false. He is, as it were, Jesus as he might have been without St. Paul or St. Augustine or the Council of Nice. He is not the cold figure of English unitarianism, and he is less grand than the exalted human of the Aryans. As you read these stories, what comes across most powerfully is that the Muslim Jesus is intensely loved. There is an element of St. Francis of Assisi in them.

    It is good to be reminded, especially now, of the intimate connections there have been between Islam and Christianity, and how close in spirit Muslim and Christian piety can come to each other. Curiously enough, the Muslim Jesus, shorn of all claims of divinity, could be more easily held onto by my agnostic friend than the Second Person of the Holy Trinity.

    One other thing: Since Muslims deny the crucifixion, their emphasis has been on the wonders surrounding "the birth of Jesus, Son of Mary," born as his mother sat under a palm tree, and miraculously speaking from within the womb.

    There really is no reason why schools that put on Nativity plays, or anyone who wants to insist on the Christian meaning of Christmas, should fear that they may offend Muslim sensibilities, for Jesus really is shared by both faiths...


    The Muslim Jesus by Tarif Khalidi (Harvard University Press) is available from Telegraph Books.
     
  7. A007

    A007 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Aqil---

    I have never read the Qur'an and as such will concede that my ignorance of it may hinder me in this debate, however....

    There are a few questions and/or comments on this post.

    To use one of your responses....What is your source for the information that Mohammad was a prophet?

    "Perfect Religion" is an oxzymoran. If it is a religion is cannot be perfect.

    How are we to know that Mohammad was not just an enlightened writer who thought he had a perfect way for man to be the most enlightened and humane person he could be which included what he percieved to be the best tenents of the Bible and the Torah?

    "It is the quickest and shortest way to salvation for those who formulate their lives according to its tenets."

    This is scary because it suggests that we are responsible for our own salvation through deeds and right living. The problem with that is that ALL of us sin and come short of the glory and mercy of God. WE WILL NEVER BE GOOD ENOUGH. So.. if God did not send his son to die for our sins and bare the burden of our salvation...we are all doomed. We are imperfect by nature...so regardless of our faith, and/or guides we will never be good enough or enlightened enough to secure our own salvation.
     
  8. PURRRfect

    PURRRfect Member MEMBER

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    i understand fully what you are sayin a007
     
  9. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't...because Jesus says in Matthew 5:48, "Therefore you shall be perfect, just as your Father in Heaven is perfect."
     
  10. A007

    A007 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Aqil--

    yet again you have taken a scripture (from a book that you really don't believe in) and taken it out of context to use it for your own purposes.

    Jesus was referring to our love for our brothers and our enimies. He is simply admonishing us to be perfect in our love.

    And anyway...we really don't know if those exact words were used (perfect) because, as you stated, the bible has lost a lot in its translations.
     
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