Black People : THE HIDDEN COST OF BEING AFRICAN AMERICAN

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Nov 17, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What is the hidden cost of being African American?

    What is the hidden cost of being African American? The Hidden Cost of Being African American, authored by Thomas Shapiro, Pokross Professor of Law and Social Policy, offers a new perspective on race in American society. Shapiro's book argues that despite the steady rise in employment and annual income among African Americans, inheritance along with public policy and discrimination in housing markets and communities reverses this advancement.

    "Inheritance is the enemy of meritocracy and perhaps democracy as well," said Shapiro. "The average African American family has 10 cents for every dollar of wealth that whites possess. This racial wealth gap does not result just from lower education, jobs, performance and paychecks."

    Shapiro interviewed almost 200 families from Los Angeles, Boston, and St. Louis - meeting with white and black families, middle and working class families and urban and suburban families. Through in-depth conversations he probed the critical choices facing families with young school aged children. In conjunction with the interview data, an analysis of national survey data taken from over 10,000 families was used to demonstrate how racial inequality is passed down from generation to generation through the use of private family wealth.

    He used this data to assess the role of financial assets in determining advantage, disadvantage and opportunities, providing a novel way of looking at how inequality is generated and passed along. The Hidden Cost of Being African American illustrates how the ability of some families to leverage their wealth by moving to better neighborhoods and taking advantage of better services, and housing markets, makes equal opportunity all the more difficult for those without financial assets.

    "Nothing is wrong with improving your children's opportunities, except when it means disadvantaging and disenfranchising the American dream for others," said Shapiro. "Unfortunately, in America today the wealth of communities and substandard ones connects tightly with educational opportunities -- the shameful part is that in too many places the ticket to a great school comes from buying a house that is affordable to very few."

    Shapiro found that it was common for young families to buy homes only with substantial financial assistance from their parents, thereby allowing the relocation to communities and schools that they could not afford based on their earnings alone.

    "Inherited assets are not earned," said Shapiro. "Wealth has a special character because it is something that is handed down in families, and thus can represent the cumulative advantages and disadvantages of previous eras visiting the present."

    In The Hidden Cost of Being African American, Shapiro reshapes public understanding of racial inequality and why new policies are necessary. He shows how families use private wealth to leverage advantages in communities and schooling, providing insight into how wealth accumulated from the past allows substantial opportunities



    CLICK ON THE WEBSITE FOR MORE...

    http://my.brandeis.edu/news/item?news_item_id=102455&show_release_date=1



    PEACE!
    ISAIAH
     
  2. pdiane

    pdiane Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Another argument for raparations. Thank Brother Isaiah
     
  3. Dual Karnayn

    Dual Karnayn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is why our people need to learn the difference between money and wealth.

    We could improve our condition in one month without spending a dime.

    If we were more active in politics and learned how to treat one another we wouldn't have to spend a fortune buying big suburban homes and fancy cars just to dodge the pot holes.

    We could stay in our own lower income neighborhoods and live just as safe while demanding that the government provide adequate, clean, and safe public transportation for us.
     
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