Black Spirituality Religion : The Emotional Challenge for Black Folks and a Diary of Thoughts

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Blackbird, Feb 11, 2011.

  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Introduction: First I want to say formally "Hey" to all my brothers and sisters, friends, acquaintances, comrades, fellows, uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, cousins and general kin people here on Destee. It's cool to be back and in the good online company of Black folks. We may be counted as 12% of the population in the United States, but even with all our hangups, misalignments, faults and failures, we are 100% real and never allow anyone to say different.

    With that said, in general Blackbird fashion, let me get to the meat of my thread.

    Lately, religion hasn't factored much in my thoughts as my day to day has been centered on navigating the business and financial arenas of life. Let me clarify.... I am always grateful to my Creator, my ancestors and the spirits that walk with me and that will never change. I haven't focused so much or so intently on any one particular religion, as far as whether it's right or wrong.

    As I told Bro. Clyde some time ago, the Bird has come full circle to live and let live. To each, his or her own is and has been my motto for some time.

    Is there a place for religion?

    Yes, as a source of strength and nourishment for that part of the human body that needs the support of a higher power. We all have those requirements as the naked animals we are. It is hard-wired into our genetic being.

    What is a more valid religion for Black people?

    It depends on the person, their needs and their perspective. One person may derive much benefit from being a Christian; whereas, another following an ATR route may be more appropriate. As a whole, there is no "valid" religion for Black people. I choose to follow an ATR tradition because of my own individual requirements and philosophy as a Black man in America. Yet, that makes it no more valid then the Muslim brother or Baptist sister.

    Then what is religion?

    Religion is simply a path a person takes to participate in and experience the Divine, whether within one's self or outside of themselves. It is the vehicle for accessing a power greater than themselves to overcome life's challenges or puzzles.

    So what is the challenge?

    The one single thing posing the greates challenge to Black people is the emotional response a belief in any religion is able to elicit within a person that can have a negative impact on those around them. The most devastating example of this emotional response would be terrorist acts perform in the name of "God" and religion.

    For most Black people, this emotional response serves a hindrance to Black people uniting together to solve our most pressing problems facing us a people - poverty, undereducation, fraticide, lack of investment in communities, absence of volunteerism, weak political representation, so on and so forth.

    In addition, there is the judgment piece that goes along with the disunity such as Christians are ignorant, miseducated Negroes, Muslims are brainwashed, Arab followers, Vodouisants are animal sacrificing wicked devil worshippers, etc.

    As a people, we suffer from enough stereotypes that pigeonhole us and even work to condition how even we perceive own ourselves as well as influence our own behaviors. Then we add all the b/s we harbor about people of other religious faiths and even a recipe of utter confusion. So here we are.

    What is our next move?

    I know one thing I wasn't born any religious belief. I grew up in a rural Black Baptist church in north Louisiana. I was Baptist or a Christian, but I wasn't born Baptist or a Christian. I now practice Vodou, but I wasn't born a Vodouisant.

    I don't know about you but I was born Black and will always be Black.

    Let's ask the hypothetical question: What if all religious beliefs were detrimental to Black (African) collective survival, would you give up your religius belief in order for Black people to survive?

    The Bird
     
  2. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa and Peace and Love!

    .......Ase, Ase, Ase...Blackbird, well said indeed...Peace In,






    :teach:
     
  3. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    So you what... that's it.

    Y'all know Blackbird....

    Are you willing to release whatever religious belief you believe in if it was found to be detrimental to Black unity?

    At any given moment, all religious beliefs can have the potential to be devastating to Black unity because the core of their existence is not to uplift Black people or promote Black unity.

    How can a Muslim honestly break bread with equality and unconditional love with an infidel?

    How can a Christian attend a funeral ceremony objectively with a religious filter where animal sacrifice is performed?

    Can y'all take this journey with me? Let's walk, okay?

    Strong belief in anything elicits such a strong emotional response to sometimes cloud judgement and motivate actions that only belief in something motivates.

    Thus should religion be a public or private thing or both? If both, to what extent should it be public and to what extent should it be private?
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    As a Christian the emotional response is Love, and Love in action

    but also the Alafaa of the Yoruba also stresses Love

    also the Husia and Pert Em Heru

    as well as the five pillars of Islam

    also the eight fold path of Bhudda

    and the aphorisms of Pathanjali in Hinduism

    Black Elk speaks of this in the tradition of the Lakota nations

    and Castenad talks about this important principle, amongst the Yaqui nations in the south west

    The challenge is to understand what Malcolm said and that if your religion doesnt do anything for you then you need to get rid of it.

    And what has hurt the computer age Black community is a failure to put LOVE into collective action

    as is prescribed in all religons

    instead of pimping one religion or another as a personal,
    cloak , which one can hide in

    in some ivory tower, away,

    from the

    pains and sufferings of the community, nationaly and internationaly
     
  5. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Your Peace is always welcomed, Bro. Clyde.

    As I have come back to Destee with the same old sniping at play, I was shaken by MsInterpret's frustration. We do need to stop trying to out-trump another and get to the family's business.

    People are people. Love is what is needed and understanding. The liberation of us as a people will come with understanding. Peace brother.
     
  6. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It hit me as I was writing Bro. Clyde back. Ankhur touched on it as well. The common threads that unite so many religious beliefs are love for each other, personal responsibility, duty of purpose, sacrifice, discipline, honesty and just dealings.

    One of my mentors once told me, "We hate what we fear and we fear what we do not know and we do not know what we do not understand."

    We hate those other beliefs because we fear them. We fear them because we do not know why others practice or believe in them. We do not know why others would practice or believe in them because we have yet to understand the inner message they have to offer.

    This same formula can be applied to us. We have yet to understand the message of what being a Black person is. Is there a message? If anything, we do not understand the value we all hold individually that contributes to make us a people worth living, worth surviving, worth being happy and fortunate.

    All of this on this journey, this unraveling of the flower is one of acceptance and understanding. Love is the arrow from Ochosi's quiver that is able to pull these things to us. In order, for us to prosper we must LOVE ourselves. We must begin to combat the constant assault to divide us with LOVE UNCONDITIONALLY. Unconditional love means accepting and understanding even the lowest of us, even the so-called Uncle Toms and sell-outs.
     
  7. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa and Peace and Love!




    .......You said it all for me Blackbird, really:

    As far as the public or private action of one's belief, for quite some time now, 2 plus years to be exact, our GroupThink Project-Group assembly has operated under these terms:

    "As discussed in the 9th meeting, December 11, 2008, topics such as (Religion, Barack Obama, Meat Eaters vs. Vegetarians, Matriarchal vs. Patriarchal), etc…need not hit the table, because they are irreconcilable and will only divide us at this time. As a group of people, we are nowhere near coming to a consensus on any of the above-related subjects. When we come together, topics such as these should be put on the back burner, as issues that divide us."

    And as a result, our homegrown publication, BAMN: By Any Means Necessary, will hit the market, soon and very soon...Peace In again, my friend, for real-straight talk.

     
  8. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa and Peace and Love!

    .......Ase, Ase, Ase Blackbird, well said indeed. Peace In,






    :teach:
     
  9. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Perhaps I missed something but did anyone answer your question in the previous responses?

    I have no "religious belef" so the answer is YES since I have long ago posted a thread here arguing the divisiveness that "ireligious belief" causes which is why we keep going around asking the same questions in circular fashion, with most respondants ducking the issue as they cling to their own "beliefs".

    Peace out!
     
  10. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    How have you been, uncle?

    Thank you for your sharp recall and I appreciate your response. To my knowledge, no one answered my question. Just for the record, my answer would be "YES" as well.

    I will allow each to his or her own. But ultimately, I hold no true religious belief either, especially one I'm not willing to drop to benefit me and mine.

    Again the question: What if all religious beliefs were detrimental to Black (African) collective survival, would you give up your religius belief in order for Black people to survive?
     
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