Black Spirituality Religion : "The Ebony Exodus Project: Why Some Black Women Are Walking Out on Religion—and Others Should Too"

RAPTOR

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Sep 12, 2009
6,840
3,592
Published on Sep 15, 2013
Candace L. M. Gorham, LPC, discusses her new book, The Ebony Exodus Project: Why Some Black Women Are Walking Out on Religion—and Others Should Too. Drawing on her own past experience as an evangelical minister and her present work as a secular counselor and researcher, she makes a direct connection between the church and the plight of black women, who are the single most religious demographic in the United States, yet among the poorest, least educated, and least healthy groups in the nation. Through interviews with African-American women who have left the church, the author reveals the shame and suffering often caused by the church—and the resulting happiness, freedom, and sense of purpose these women have felt upon walking away from it. She calls on other black women to honestly reflect on their relationship with religion and challenges them to consider that perhaps the answers to their problems rest not inside a church, but in themselves.
 

GodofTomorrow

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jan 8, 2014
53
28
I hope she goes on to say that spirituality is still, in effect, an answer for these women-- just not the spirituality they've been given. Many a time I've seen religious people jump into atheism, only to become equally dogmatic in their belief to science.
 

Omowale Jabali

The Cosmic Journeyman
PREMIUM MEMBER
Sep 29, 2005
20,817
9,451
Temple of Kali, Yubaland
Occupation
Creative Industrialist
Published on Sep 15, 2013
Candace L. M. Gorham, LPC, discusses her new book, The Ebony Exodus Project: Why Some Black Women Are Walking Out on Religion—and Others Should Too. Drawing on her own past experience as an evangelical minister and her present work as a secular counselor and researcher, she makes a direct connection between the church and the plight of black women, who are the single most religious demographic in the United States, yet among the poorest, least educated, and least healthy groups in the nation. Through interviews with African-American women who have left the church, the author reveals the shame and suffering often caused by the church—and the resulting happiness, freedom, and sense of purpose these women have felt upon walking away from it. She calls on other black women to honestly reflect on their relationship with religion and challenges them to consider that perhaps the answers to their problems rest not inside a church, but in themselves.

Good for them!
 
Destee Chat

Latest profile posts

Destee wrote on Joyce's profile.
Thanks for the Blessing! Love You! :kiss:
Making sure I do more than I did yesterday. Progress is the Concept.
Ms Drea wrote on yahsistah's profile.
Welcome Back Sister!!
Love and Blessings!!
Hey Sister Destee just logged in to say Love you and miss you much! Hope you are well.
Destee wrote on candeesweet's profile.
Hi Sweetie Pie Honey Bunch!!!! :love: ... it's good to see you! I hope you and yours are all well and staying safe. I Love You! :kiss:
Top