Black People : The Dark Side Of Christian History

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Keita Kenyatta, May 4, 2012.

  1. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Feb 7, 2004
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    This review is from: The Dark Side of Christian History (Paperback)
    Occasionally, a book comes along which belongs in every Pagan's personal library, but if it were up to me "The Dark Side of Christian History" would be required reading for the general population as well. Author, Helen Ellerbe, has written precisely the book I've been waiting for, and in fact would like to have written myself. While others before her have covered one or two of Christianity's more shameful exploits in a given volume, she has gathered together in one work, a definitive chronicle of events from each period from 100ce to the present day. She explains the evolution of the Christian world view and how this doctrine manifested itself in church policy, driving every aspect of its behavior. By viewing each step of this process in sequence, we see that the episodes of tyranny and oppression were not mere isolated incidents in an otherwise distinguished career of benevolence, but rather they were part of an ongoing process whereby each and every obstacle to hegemony was systematically subjugated, subdued, subverted and destroyed. In the chapter concerning modern times, entitled "A World Without God", Ellerbe demonstrates that while the power of the church is mostly gone, the effects of its doctrine in the form of a persistent world view are with us still. Western attitudes toward gender, race, sexuality and the environment have all been shaped by that doctrine created by the evolving church in its effort to impose rigid hierarchy on the entire world and everything in it. She goes on to show that while the rise of modern science has done much to strip the church of its power, most of the science of the last 500 years is in certain ways an extension of the Christian world view, rather than an affront to it, and we are only now just beginning to break free of this limitation. "The Dark Side of Christian History" though thoroughly researched and documented, is not difficult to read but it IS painful to read. I found myself hurting for all of humanity - past, present and future and asking myself the question "What if none of it ever happened?".