Black People : The dangers of DNA testing

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Zulile, Jan 14, 2008.

  1. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black Like I Thought I Was

    By Erin Aubry Kaplan, LA Weekly

    October 7, 2003

    Wayne Joseph is a 51-year-old high school principal in Chino whose
    family emigrated from the segregated parishes of Louisiana to central
    Los Angeles in the 1950s, as did mine. Like me, he is of Creole stock
    and is therefore on the lighter end of the black color spectrum, a
    common enough circumstance in the South that predates the
    multicultural movement by centuries. And like most other black folk,
    Joseph grew up with an unequivocal sense of his heritage and of
    himself; he tends toward black advocacy and has published thoughtful
    opinion pieces on racial issues in magazines like Newsweek. When
    Joseph decided on a whim to take a new ethnic DNA test he saw
    described on a 60 Minutes segment last year, it was only to indulge a
    casual curiosity about the exact percentage of black blood; virtually
    all black Americans are mixed with something, he knew, but he figured
    it would be interesting to make himself a guinea pig for this new
    testing process, which is offered by a Florida-based company called
    DNA Print Genomics Inc. The experience would at least be fodder for
    another essay for Newsweek. He got his kit in the mail, swabbed his
    mouth per the instructions and sent off the DNA samples for analysis.

    Read more: http://www.alternet.org/story/16917/
     
  2. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The Problem With This Article

    It points to something I have been saying for years. Some of us have a narrow viewpoint concerning what it means to be "Black" and even moreso when some try to regulate and designate every single "Black" person in this world to a single geographical region.

    KNOWING that "Africans" outward migrated in TWO [2] separate migrations over 12,000 years ago.

    DNA researchers then attempt to identify as "African" a few haplotype and blood type groups then assert that the original inhabitants of "europe" were "white people" KNOWING that they were indeed BLACK.

    Most likely, Wayne Joseph was NOT bloodtype "O" either.

    It fact, this is why I usually ask people what their bloodtype is when they ask me for asistance in conducting family research. Knowing their blodtype helps to reduce the "margin of error".

    It is not the DNA testing itself which is the danger. What is dangerous is that ome of us may not be ready to handle the truth we are confronted with when the results come in. Kinda like the folks on Maury Povich after they get paternity results.

    Instead of "You are NOT the Father"...imagine this,,"You are NOT a N*****!


    Who would be shocked the most? You or your "white" co-workers?
     
  3. PLATINUMILLITY1

    PLATINUMILLITY1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wow Zulile.....This was a good post...
    What is you view on this?
    Do you think people should try to find out who they are if it means getting a DNA Test?
    It is obvious that Americans are lacking the Knowledge of their TRUE heritage... Even if you are indeed an African Descended person many have no clue where they originated....

    Thankx Sister Zulile:)
    eee EE eEeEeee
    :10200:
     
  4. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa - Kudos!


    Zulile,

    This article is a godsend to me! It makes the case concerning both dominant and recessive alleles, that much more impressive. In this case, Wayne Joseph, considered black and lived that life for over 50 yrs, although his blood contained no African percentage, acquired his black looks vis-à-vis European, Native-American and Asian blood percentages. Thanks again, Zulile!

    omowalejabali :bowdown: :teach: :bowdown:

    PLATINUMILLITY, brother omowalejabali said a mouth full in his reply!

     
  5. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    If we look carefully at the Rulers of the Early Dynastic period of "Kemet" clearly many of the rulers are less "Black" in appearance than many of us here today.

    Take a good look at Raahotep and Nofret.

    Nofret, basically looks very similar to a "white woman".
     
  6. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    :heart:

    I came across this article because I am.. well, I cant say 'troubled'.. but.. baffled is a better word - at some the responses and questions about Obama and his 'Blackness' - and I cant help but ask 'who the heck are YOU to question?' :lol: Do you even know?

    the final quote in this article is: "The question ultimately is, are you who you say you are, or are you who you are genetically?"

    Perhaps, people dismiss him as Black because his white roots are too recent ;) Have we instigated our own version of the 'one drop rule' to a 'time' rule of sorts?

    I'd like to know what makes one Black. Lifestyle? clearly it isnt based on colour tone... standing against a colour pallet at a paint shop?.. or is it?

    outside of that, I enjoyed the article and feel very fortunate as I know my direct roots for ever and back again. I have adopted siblings are are not as lucky - in fact, one had his mother find and contact him a couple years ago and she was no race we ever imagined. The man has never been the same since. smh.
     
  7. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In reference its actually now the opposite.

    One drop of "white blood" and one gets branded a Boule, Uncle Tom, traitor, sell-out, and a "white boy".


    This was different in the deep south where my "mixed" ancestors were still treated as N*****s in labama, South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi. Tehy were treated exactly the same as their "full blooded" brothers and sisters as did most "mixed" folk during slavery.

    Some folks think that lighter skin automatically results in some class priviledge but this is not true. Now some of my folks in new orleans were more priviledged than those in the other states I mentioned. But it had nothing to do with light or white skin priviledge. It had more to do with the difference in the cultural dynamics of Louisiana compared to the english speaking states.

    Similar to the difference between the french assimilatonsit policy in west africa and the apartheid policy of the dutch. Social class vs color.

    Im starting to lean to the "I am who I am genetically" position because, I know that regardless of historical "admixture" that the African phenotype remains dominant.

    And yes, for those who teach bout our "Khemetic" heritage take acloser look because most of the artifacts I seen from the 1st dynasty on, as some would say, "dem colored folk" {and sho look "mixed" to me}.
     
  8. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I agree with your entire post, Brother O - but highlighted the one part above because I'd sincerely like to know - what makes an "african american"? I'd like to know what is it that makes some deny Obama's 'Blackness'.

    Is being a true African American totally cultural? If one is born/raised/living on the other side of the tracks... suddenly less Black?

    (Folk gotta stop bringing up the C Thomas's.. he had his view long before he got all important.. so no surprises. He 'hoodwinkined' nobody.)

    But I am sincerely curious - for a people who have no tangible roots/history - how is it that they are so easy to exclude folk from their group?
     
  9. Desert Storm

    Desert Storm Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Zulile, this a good article. I posted a poem called Louisiana Plantation and I was shocked by my own family history. I mean, I think that "BLACKNESS" and an "African American" is something that "white" people made up, seriously. Whites have been trying define who we are since we've come to this country. I don't see any africans debating over this issue at all. Culture is culture and the question I guess is on how you express it or how loyal or true that you stay to it or appear to be.

    There are just so many different dynamics that play a role, "BLACKNESS" so to speak. Why let ourselves get duked by what has tried to classify us. Why not DEFINE ourselves and STOP letting other DEFINE WHO WE ARE. "BLACKS" ARE INDIVIDUALS too. We don't all think the same, look the same, talk the same, walk the same, express ourselves the same, do the same, want the same, experience the same. etc.,etc.,etc.

    ONE TRUTH, be it ever so SIMPLE is that we ALL STRUGGLE, FOR THE SAME. NOT TO BE DEFINED BY WHAT HISTORY HAS MADE US OUT TO BE.

    That's why even though I have to put up with questions from whites that I hate to answer and that seem silly to answer, I LOVE TO MAKE THEM SQUIRM! I love for them to see me as an INDIVIDUAL and not someone that they've known through the television. Don't get me wrong, there is a time to LAUGH. However, how long are we going to live in a FANTASY world?

    I read the article and AM NOT SURPRISED! In todays world we go by what you look like. I've met some mixed ppl who "LOOK" more "BLACK" than me, in comparison but my family hasn't mixed since the 1800's. So, I DON'T KNOW YOU TELL ME!, now the one who "LOOKS" MORE "BLACK" is more black because of their features!?????

    And I've only scratched the surface of my family history! I wouldn't be surprised if I was 75% African to be quite honest with you!

    Good thread. Good discussion.

    Thank you.

    DS
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    sister Zulile

    I cant answer your questions because these are things that I cant explain because I dont understand it either. I dont understand the "victim" mentality or the mentality of those who still identify as "negro" and then view Obama as "less Negro" than they are when he clearly is more CONSCIOUS than they are.

    I said before "Blackness is a state of mind". That's how steve biko explained it. so I do view it as more cultural than "racial". Then again, you never hear me identify myself as "african-american". Simply black or Afrikan. I dont identify with anything "american".

    Peace.
     
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